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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 918

post #13756 of 13762

Interestingly enough, I have always bought size US 9.5 shoes. Just measured my own foot at exactly 10" of length which coverts to a US 8/8.5. These chelsea boots are UK 8.5 or US 9/9.5. Not conclusive, but interesting to me at least.

post #13757 of 13762
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnewelljr View Post

Interestingly enough, I have always bought size US 9.5 shoes. Just measured my own foot at exactly 10" of length which coverts to a US 8/8.5. These chelsea boots are UK 8.5 or US 9/9.5. Not conclusive, but interesting to me at least.

First, lasts between shoe companies don't adhere religiously to any set of standards. And even among last companies sizes aren't always congruent.

A size 9 in an Acme shoe might "stick" the same as a 9.5 or even a 10 in an Apex shoe.

Second, length may or may not have anything to do with it--instep girths, as well as waist girths, are a factor in foot slide. And the long heel measurement is even more critical...esp. when the shoe has no laces or any way to tighten you back into the shoe, short of original fit.

edited for punctuation and clarity

--
Edited by DWFII - Yesterday at 10:09 am
post #13758 of 13762
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnewelljr View Post

Interestingly enough, I have always bought size US 9.5 shoes. Just measured my own foot at exactly 10" of length which coverts to a US 8/8.5. These chelsea boots are UK 8.5 or US 9/9.5. Not conclusive, but interesting to me at least.

I'm not sure if this is the case, so apologies if it isn't, but from your questions it seems like you are newly purchasing shoes of a higher quality than you previously were wearing. In general, I find that your sneaker size in the well known brands is often a full size higher than your dress shoe size from the better makers. If you ordered your Cheaneys are the same size that you have previously been wearing for sneakers and glued shoes they very likely are too big. Here are a couple of my sizes just as a comparison.

New Balance gym shoes: US11EE
Allen Edmonds 5 last: US10E
Alden Barrie last: US9.5D
Crockett & Jones 348 last: UK9E

Don't get hung up on the size number as it means different things to different manufacturers and different lasts. Alden Barrie in US9.5D is a very comfortable last for me while Alden Aberdeen last in US10D is painfully small. Forget about the number and go with what fits the best.
post #13759 of 13762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I have a new pair of Tricker's shoes and they have a very, very thick sole. At the moment, my feet don't slip forward in them but there is a little movement at the heel. Otherwise, they are very comfortable. I was wondering if the soles need time to bend a little. I imagine that very thick soles on shoes may influence movement at the heel - the uppers are stitched to - initially - very hard and unbending soles. The soles on my Tricker's are probably as thick as the soles on many boots (they are thicker, for example, than the ones on my Loake Chester's). I would have thought that the soles on boots are subject to a different sort of leverage than is the case with shoes. 

If the boot is really and truly a high top shoe, the leverage shouldn't be all that different. But you're correct about a thicker, stiffer outsole having an effect on heel slippage. As does fit--the width of the heelseat and the thickness of the comb.
post #13760 of 13762

Thanks, DWF, that is helpful and useful.

 :cheers:

post #13761 of 13762

So I bought a pair of Allen Edmonds Leeds the other day and they just got here. 

They don't seem to have the normal tiny creases even though they seem to have
never seen shoe trees. I'm not sure, maybe they're shell? How would I tell? I took
some pictures, but I've never actually seen shell before. 

 

 

This is after some brushing and a shoe tree. They don't seem
to have the tiny cracks that develop without trees like normal.

They're almost rough in the cracks. 

 

 

This is the other shoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's some pictures of the eyelets if it helps. 

 

post #13762 of 13762

Those are definitely shells. And as of those tiny cracks, brush the surface up really good, then burnish some conditioner on them, and you're all set.

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