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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 913

post #13681 of 19061
Usually just around the heel, the sock and possibly the tongue lining on an Oxford. This is because lining leathers are tanned specifically for lining, usually veg tanned, and in the forepart where the action happens you want a specific lining if possible. There's also normally no way of telling if the pigments will rub off onto socks without trying a pair either.

There's exceptions obviously, whole cuts with coloured lining should have whole cut lining etc. so there's no way around it.
post #13682 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

You're welcome...

Your insight is invaluable. I'd like to ask another question that has been on my mind relating to the lifespan of a pair of shoes, you may know the answer or at least have an idea.

A pair of shoes can be rewelted a finite number of times (I understand around 4 times or as long as the uppers hold up) and each welt can take a finite number of resoles (2 -3 on average?). Why does a typical Northampton manufacturer insist on replacing the welt each time they perform a resole? Surely rewelting every second or third resole will dramatically lengthen the life of the shoe?
post #13683 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

Usually just around the heel, the sock and possibly the tongue lining on an Oxford. This is because lining leathers are tanned specifically for lining, usually veg tanned, and in the forepart where the action happens you want a specific lining if possible. There's also normally no way of telling if the pigments will rub off onto socks without trying a pair either.

There's exceptions obviously, whole cuts with coloured lining should have whole cut lining etc. so there's no way around it.

Thanks for the advice. Would you line the underside of the eyelets with the coloured lining?

post #13684 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by inimitable View Post

Your insight is invaluable. I'd like to ask another question that has been on my mind relating to the lifespan of a pair of shoes, you may know the answer or at least have an idea.

A pair of shoes can be rewelted a finite number of times (I understand around 4 times or as long as the uppers hold up) and each welt can take a finite number of resoles (2 -3 on average?). Why does a typical Northampton manufacturer insist on replacing the welt each time they perform a resole? Surely rewelting every second or third resole will dramatically lengthen the life of the shoe?

Well, it's hard to speak to the longevity or resole practices of RTW shoes. I know the procedures and many of the pitfalls both from direct personal experience and association with people who do RTW work. But I, myself, do not. Or at least I don't do any form of GY welted work.

I do hand welted and given mindful and regular care there is no reason to set a theoretical or even practical limit on the number of times a HW shoe can be resoled or even rewelted. It's has more to do with the individual shoe, the leathers, the owner and the care he gives them. The Duke of Rothsay (Prince Charles) is famous for wearing shoes that have to have been resoled dozens of times.

As far as repairing or resoling the shoe...even rewelting...there is no reason why such procedures should weaken or degrade a shoe, esp. if it is HW. GY is another story. However, even then, it all depends on how much care is taken when doing the resole/rewelt work.

edited for punctuation and clarity

--
Edited by DWFII - 2/23/15 at 6:15am
post #13685 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

Usually just around the heel, the sock and possibly the tongue lining on an Oxford. This is because lining leathers are tanned specifically for lining, usually veg tanned, and in the forepart where the action happens you want a specific lining if possible. There's also normally no way of telling if the pigments will rub off onto socks without trying a pair either.

There's exceptions obviously, whole cuts with coloured lining should have whole cut lining etc. so there's no way around it.

+1 esp. about pigments staining socks.

You're the first maker I've run across...other than myself...who puts a whole cut lining in a whole cut oxford. Someday I would like to exchange notes with you about how to mount the tongue in a whole cut with a whole cut lining.

PS...for FredAstaire...in almost all cases the lining will be visible to the keen eye no matter what colour it is.
post #13686 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by inimitable View Post

Thank you for your reply, I hope the following photos illustrate what I am trying to get at. The welt is definitely dry, I can pick it apart with my nails.

I should probably have sent them back to the manufacturer for the repair work, but I go through my soles relatively quickly and find it hard to stomach £120 each time.




Finding a quality cobbler in London seems to be rather difficult. I was quoted £60 to rewelt and £90 for a resole. Total £150 ($230). This is more than sending back to C&J for a full recraft.
I agree, a quality cobbler should rewelt the shoe, but most here shy away from it (or are unable to do it).

This looks like an animal was chewing on it.
post #13687 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

+1 esp. about pigments staining socks.

You're the first maker I've run across...other than myself...who puts a whole cut lining in a whole cut oxford. Someday I would like to exchange notes with you about how to mount the tongue in a whole cut with a whole cut lining.

PS...for FredAstaire...in almost all cases the lining will be visible to the keen eye no matter what colour it is.

I've stopped getting colored linings and now only get natural. I have have many of ruined socks through the years. Oddly, Barker Black was the only maker who's colored linings didn't bleed onto my socks.

I like natural lining for the rustic nature of them. I like how they age and it is easier to see when they can use some care.
post #13688 of 19061

Breaking in a new pair of Chelsea boots and I have two questions. One, the front edge is starting to wear (this is after wearing them twice now). Is this normal? Two, there is a white mark on the toe. I have no idea where this came from. I tried using a damp towel to wipe it away, no luck. Salt stain? IDK. What can I do?

 

post #13689 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnewelljr View Post

Breaking in a new pair of Chelsea boots and I have two questions. One, the front edge is starting to wear (this is after wearing them twice now). Is this normal? Two, there is a white mark on the toe. I have no idea where this came from. I tried using a damp towel to wipe it away, no luck. Salt stain? IDK. What can I do?

Yes the wear is normal...it will be a little worse if the shoe were built on an extended toe last or if the shoes don't fit you correctly.

The white mark could be a scuff...cutting through the grain and exposing the chrome "blue: below the surface. Try wiping it with a wt cloth, if it turns dar, almost charcoal brey and then dries back to white is it probably a scuff.

I tend to think it is not a scuff but paint (or something like it) that you have bumped up against. The obvious question is "was it there when you bought them?" Try wiping it down with a little Bick4, or Glenkaren cleaner/conditioner.

If it doesn't come off...it's patina.

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post #13690 of 19061
1. No, you should adapt to the following walking style to minimize the wear on the front edge of the sole:



2. Looks like a huge malfunction error, I would send them back and demand a full refund.

Sorry, boring day at work, both are totally normal, just use some black wax or cream on both the front edge and mark.
post #13691 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DRAGUI99 View Post

Sunday outing  smile.gif
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


Don't leave us hanging! Can we get some IDs on your awesome collection? icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #13692 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Yes the wear is normal...it will be a little worse if the shoe were built on an extended toe last or if the shoes don't fit you correctly.

The white mark could be a scuff...cutting through the grain and exposing the chrome "blue: below the surface. Try wiping it with a wt cloth, if it turns dar, almost charcoal brey and then dries back to white is it probably a scuff.

I tend to think it is not a scuff but paint (or something like it) that you have bumped up against. The obvious question is "was it there when you bought them?" Try wiping it down with a little Bick4, or Glenkaren cleaner/conditioner.

If it doesn't come off...it's patina.

--

 

Would Saphir Renovator be appropriate to try to clean it? Or do I need something stronger?

post #13693 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnewelljr View Post

Would Saphir Renovator be appropriate to try to clean it? Or do I need something stronger?

If you have it try it.

Glenkaren has orange oil in it which might be effective. But otherwise I suspect it is the fats and oils in the Saphir or Bick4 that will loosen it and allow you to wipe it off. For that reason, whatever you use, you might apply it and then let it sit for a while before wiping it off.
post #13694 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


If you have it try it.

Glenkaren has orange oil in it which might be effective. But otherwise I suspect it is the fats and oils in the Saphir or Bick4 that will loosen it and allow you to wipe it off. For that reason, whatever you use, you might apply it and then let it sit for a while before wiping it off.

Okay thanks, I will try that. Otherwise is there any chance of it being dyed over or something by a specialist if I can't remove it?

post #13695 of 19061

Thanks DWFII and patrickBooth regarding the lining advice.

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