or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 908

post #13606 of 19045
are you just putting coats and buffing, or are you bulling the shoes? They won't get significantly more shiny unless you bull them.
post #13607 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

are you just putting coats and buffing, or are you bulling the shoes? They won't get significantly more shiny unless you bull them.

I assume not since I don't know what bulling is.  

post #13608 of 19045

Thanks, nt, I think you are probably right. 

post #13609 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchaplow View Post

I assume not since I don't know what bulling is.  

Gotta grab the bull by the horns (learn to bull your shoes).
post #13610 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Gotta grab the bull by the horns (learn to bull your shoes).

I googled around and am not 100% sure what to do.  You are correct, I just put multiple layers of polish and lightly buffed between.  If you could give me some clues or a link I would greatly appreciate it.

post #13611 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchaplow View Post

I googled around and am not 100% sure what to do.  You are correct, I just put multiple layers of polish and lightly buffed between.  If you could give me some clues or a link I would greatly appreciate it.

It's just a military "spitshine"--literally, thin layers of wax, elbow grease and spit.
post #13612 of 19045
There's a billion YouTube videos of how to do it.
post #13613 of 19045

Thanks Guys.  There seems to be a lot of conflicting/varying methods out there.  I was applying each layer fairly vigorously.   First I'll try backing off on the pressure for the subsequent layers of polish and see what happens.

post #13614 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

There's a billion YouTube videos of how to do it.

@Crat has a pretty good one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o135MzEDjws
post #13615 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post


@Crat has a pretty good one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o135MzEDjws

Perfect!!!  Thank you.  Also, I was using about 100X the amount of polish he was.  

post #13616 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


When you say you "picked these up," it makes me think you were thrifting when you bought them. They definitely fit into the category of seconds. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.

It looks like...if nothing else...that the vamps were cut from two different and non-matching sections of the hide. At worst, from two different hides.

Since shoes like this are undoubtedly machine lasted, and since the machines have a limited stroke, both vamps were pulled almost precisely the same amount. Yet lasting the toe on the one pulled the texture completely out where it did not on the other.

What does that tell us? It tells us that the vamp on the right shoe is cut from far better quality leather than the vamp on the left. The vamp on the left may even come from belly.

But there's another problem--from the photo above it looks like the shoes are two different colours. Some of that may be simply from the flattening of the leather but it also could be that the vamps came from two different hides from two different dye lots. Manufacturers often click the pieces for a whole run of shoes before they ever start putting them together (and they cut for maximum yield not maximum quality). So a two foot stack of clicked vamps may not necessarily be paired correctly.

I don't know of anything you can do to remedy this problem without making it worse--abrading the leather and/or creating unsightly pipes and wrinkles of excess leather. Since I'm the only one answering, there may not be a solution. But seek a second opinion...or return them if you can.

Don't shoot the messenger.

--edited for spelling and punctuation


While I don't disagree that there is an inconsistency in lasting, they look like they are made from a pebble grained leather, not that the leather on the left shoe is made from a bad piece. Many embossed leathers are known for losing their embossing at the toe when placed under pressure, particularly at the toe. That seems to be what happened here, and one shoe has it more than the other. The difference in colour may be due to the same. The shoe on the right received more pressure, losing the embossing and potentially lightening some, if it had some slight pull-up effect.

 

There is an error, but I would say the primary error was in lasting tension, not in clicking.

post #13617 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonotovsOpera View Post


While I don't disagree that there is an inconsistency in lasting, they look like they are made from a pebble grained leather, not that the leather on the left shoe is made from a bad piece. Many embossed leathers are known for losing their embossing at the toe when placed under pressure, particularly at the toe. That seems to be what happened here, and one shoe has it more than the other. The difference in colour may be due to the same. The shoe on the right received more pressure, losing the embossing and potentially lightening some, if it had some slight pull-up effect.

There is an error, but I would say the primary error was in lasting tension, not in clicking.

I don't think you quite got the gist of what I was saying. But you are correct as far as it goes.

That said, if the vamps had been clicked from comparable pieces of leather from equally prime sections of the hide and then lasted by machine the lasting tensions would have been identical on both shoes and the pull out would not have occurred.

If, given the same clicking, the shoes had been lasted by hand...it's hard to imagine any competent maker pulling one toe so hard that the texture was flattened...and not seeing that, and/or, at the very least, compensating for it on the other shoe.

The most generous explanation is that the shoes were machine lasted and clicked from different areas of the hide. Nothing else makes sense unless you want to presumptively call into question the judgement of the maker.
post #13618 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I don't think you quite got the gist of what I was saying. But you are correct as far as it goes.

That said, if the vamps had been clicked from comparable pieces of leather from equally prime sections of the hide and then lasted by machine the lasting tensions would have been identical on both shoes and the pull out would not have occurred.

If, given the same clicking, the shoes had been lasted by hand...it's hard to imagine any competent maker pulling one toe so hard that the texture was flattened...and not seeing that, and/or, at the very least, compensating for it on the other shoe.

The most generous explanation is that the shoes were machine lasted and clicked from different areas of the hide. Nothing else makes sense unless you want to presumptively call into question the judgement of the maker.


I think we're saying the same thing.

 

Regarding the judgement of the maker... They did ship out this pair of boots without a second thought. That's all I'll say on that.

post #13619 of 19045

Just got two pairs of Cheaneys. I am planning on using the following three products on them:

 

Saphir Super Invulner Spray (water proofing)

 

Saphir Renovateur (cleaning and conditioning)

 

Wax Polish (color matched, sold by Cheaney)

 

 

As these are my first "nice" shoes, I was wondering how often to apply each, what order, etc. I think it is unlikely I will have the discipline to do it weekly, so maybe something I can every month?

post #13620 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Looks like a mismatched pair to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonotovsOpera View Post


While I don't disagree that there is an inconsistency in lasting, they look like they are made from a pebble grained leather, not that the leather on the left shoe is made from a bad piece. Many embossed leathers are known for losing their embossing at the toe when placed under pressure, particularly at the toe. That seems to be what happened here, and one shoe has it more than the other. The difference in colour may be due to the same. The shoe on the right received more pressure, losing the embossing and potentially lightening some, if it had some slight pull-up effect.

There is an error, but I would say the primary error was in lasting tension, not in clicking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I don't think you quite got the gist of what I was saying. But you are correct as far as it goes.

That said, if the vamps had been clicked from comparable pieces of leather from equally prime sections of the hide and then lasted by machine the lasting tensions would have been identical on both shoes and the pull out would not have occurred.

If, given the same clicking, the shoes had been lasted by hand...it's hard to imagine any competent maker pulling one toe so hard that the texture was flattened...and not seeing that, and/or, at the very least, compensating for it on the other shoe.

The most generous explanation is that the shoes were machine lasted and clicked from different areas of the hide. Nothing else makes sense unless you want to presumptively call into question the judgement of the maker.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonotovsOpera View Post


I think we're saying the same thing.

Regarding the judgement of the maker... They did ship out this pair of boots without a second thought. That's all I'll say on that.

Thanks gents, they are pebble grain. They definitely shouldn't have shipped like this.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**