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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 890

post #13336 of 13344
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Well, you could try Bick4, Lexol, and Glen's conditioner in the further future.

Glen's has too much wax for such a casual boot IMO. I maybe should have used Bick4 this time but what's done is done.
post #13337 of 13344

The reason for extra wax is 1). some shine (as per reference, for this one) and 2). a lot more protections, which, if these boots are going under weather, is crucial.

post #13338 of 13344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

Glen's has too much wax for such a casual boot IMO. I maybe should have used Bick4 this time but what's done is done.

I don't think that would be much of a factor. GlenKaren conditioner has beeswax, coconut oil and orange oil in it. The beeswax is not as hard as carnuba...it won't shine like carnuba.

If any wax is going to be used on a casual shoe beeswax is going to be the wax of choice. Waterproofing agents such as Montana Pitch Blend and Obenaufs...both intended for casual/work shoes...are based on beeswax.
post #13339 of 13344
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I don't think that would be much of a factor. GlenKaren conditioner has beeswax, coconut oil and orange oil in it. The beeswax is not as hard as carnuba...it won't shine like carnuba.

If any wax is going to be used on a casual shoe beeswax is going to be the wax of choice. Waterproofing agents such as Montana Pitch Blend and Obenaufs...both intended for casual/work shoes...are based on beeswax.

Indeed. However, Tapir from Germany was known to used carnauba in their grease. My theory is if a grease contains carnauba it'll brings forth a very tough element resistance barrier, what do you think?

 

Side notes: I don't know about you, but unless I am wearing fire fighting boots, the only other leather I'd put Obenauf on is generally sole leather.

post #13340 of 13344
I apply a very light coat of obenauf HDLP with my fingers to my horween waxy leather boots, retains the original look of the leather and adds a little protection...very happy with it...second winter doing it...leather is not water beading slathered with the stuff nor do I heat the boots prior or afteralplication.
post #13341 of 13344

Sounds just right, the fingers won't over load it. Once per year application?

post #13342 of 13344
Yes just once a year...the key for me was retaining the waxy look...I have seen were people heat their boots in ovens and also soften the hdlp and literally glob it on...I guess some need more waterproofing and it seems to work but it really darkens them and changes the look of the leather too much for me.
post #13343 of 13344
Hi all - I'm fairly new to shell cordovan, and just picked up a pair of Church's in great shape, except for a couple of noticeable scuffs on one heel:


I gave them a coat of lexol non-darkening leather dressing, then wrapped a couple of layers of thick t-shirt over a spoon to smooth out the scuffs and the bottoms of the "waves" on the upper, where the skin had gotten a bit rough. Much improved over all, but I rubbed until a rough finish developed around those scuffs on the heel. The rough spot almost felt sticky.


I think the 2nd photo shows that the scuffs are less noticeable, but there is a bit of a rough patch there as well. I switched to just a dry flannel cloth, which seems to have improved it a bit. Can any of you tell me 1) what I did wrong to make this rough spot, and 2) what is the best way to get rid of it?
post #13344 of 13344
I would not have done it with the t-shirt; if you applied any force it's basically like sandpaper. I would just let it rest a couple of days and see if it clears up and then maybe use some wax to seal the shell.
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