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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 885

post #13261 of 19067

I always got a kick out of the blucher's origin, Gebhard von Blucher...

 

The Blucher Shoe
During the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century, a Prussian general named Gebhard Leberecht von Blucher saw that his soldiers were having trouble getting their boots on and off. To solve this problem, he commissioned a half boot with two leather flaps across the vamp held together by laces. The design was so popular that it quickly spread across Europe, becoming the blueprint for what we know today as the eponymous blucher dress shoe.

post #13262 of 19067
I call them derbies because that is the British term for it and I am a huge douchebag like that so yeah.
post #13263 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I call them derbies because that is the British term for it and I am a huge douchebag like that so yeah.

Outstanding. 

post #13264 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_b View Post

I always got a kick out of the blucher's origin, Gebhard von Blucher...

The Blucher Shoe

During the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century, a Prussian general named Gebhard Leberecht von Blucher saw that his soldiers were having trouble getting their boots on and off. To solve this problem, he commissioned a half boot with two leather flaps across the vamp held together by laces. The design was so popular that it quickly spread across Europe, becoming the blueprint for what we know today as the eponymous blucher dress shoe.

OK...but I doubt that was the first time a shoe like that was seen. In the 18th century buckle shoes were popular. The buckle was very different than what we use today. It was not permanently mounted on the shoe but fastened on two latchets that came across the instep of the vamp. When the latchets wore out...the buckles were characterized by sharp prongs...or the buckles were lost, the lachets were cut short and holes were punched in the ends and a thong run between them to lace the shoe up.

It could be argued that that's the real origin of the derby.

--
Edited by DWFII - 1/22/15 at 7:36pm
post #13265 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

If they are not a real "dressy" shoe, something like R.M Williams Saddle Dressing or Lexol-nf will almost certainly help, esp. with time and repetition, but be aware such products can darken the leather...permanently.

First application of Lexol nf worked quite well. Already more supple. Thanks again.
post #13266 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

First application of Lexol nf worked quite well. Already more supple. Thanks again.

cheers.gif
post #13267 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


 a thong run between them

Sigh.  

 

Were we talking about shoes?

post #13268 of 19067

I tested Lexol conditioner last night on one pair of shoes and Saphir Creme Univelle ( I have been using this one for a long time) in some other pair. Less sticky, smelly (no wax) and no such a bright finish polish in comparison to S. C. Universalle....but it darkens the leather the same way IMO (have no idea about wich one have better leather properties though). I like it much. I might leave the Saphir Cremme for the sole´s stiching and edges. Waiting for B. 4 to arrive and compare. 

post #13269 of 19067

Don't you worry much about darkening. If you let it dry properly, it will lighten up, and will give you a fairly attractive burnishing look when brush. Brushing or buffing too early can result in darkening.

post #13270 of 19067

I am not  worried at all about darkening, as far as I know the leather will bring out his natural colour after a couple of wearings/brushings (of course with good conditioners). I usually brush them 10m after they are conditioned (in fact I do not want to expend more time ) and for me their much done.  Just wanted to compare conditoners stuff, and Lexol works quite well IMO (no deep wax smell). Nevertheless, thanks for your input about brushing them later.

post #13271 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

I tested Lexol conditioner last night on one pair of shoes and Saphir Creme Univelle ( I have been using this one for a long time) in some other pair. Less sticky, smelly (no wax) and no such a bright finish polish in comparison to S. C. Universalle....but it darkens the leather the same way IMO (have no idea about wich one have better leather properties though). I like it much. I might leave the Saphir Cremme for the sole´s stiching and edges. Waiting for B. 4 to arrive and compare. 

Lexol comes in several varieties...

Lexol in a brown plastic bottle with cream (or white) printing. Won't darken leather appreciably.

Lexol-nf, which is super homogenized neatsfoot oil (nf=neatsfoot) Cream bottle with green printing. will darken leather.

Also Lexol-ph which is a ph neutral soap/cleaner and comes in a bright orange plastic bottle.

They are not interchangeable.
post #13272 of 19067

I tested Lexol Conditioner (brown plastic bottle).  I believe once has been applied, it darkens the leather as much as SCUniversalle but, as said, once you wear your shoes a couple of times and brush them, the leather will bring his natural colour (that is my experience with SCU and hope the same for Lexol). I have gotten Lexol Ph Cleaner (orange plastic bottle) to be tested too (wanted to test saddle soap but I will refrain from doing so due to comments here) but I will do so once my shoes are completly dirty (otherwise I use a damp cloth after brushing), so waiting to play football with my kids on my leather shoes, lol. Thanks again for your inputs about Lexol products..

post #13273 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

I tested Lexol Conditioner (brown plastic bottle).  I believe once has been applied, it darkens the leather as much as SCUniversalle but, as said, once you wear your shoes a couple of times and brush them, the leather will bring his natural colour (that is my experience with SCU and hope the same for Lexol). I have gotten Lexol Ph Cleaner (orange plastic bottle) to be tested too (wanted to test saddle soap but I will refrain from doing so due to comments here) but I will do so once my shoes are completly dirty (otherwise I use a damp cloth after brushing), so waiting to play football with my kids on my leather shoes, lol. Thanks again for your inputs about Lexol products..

In all probability the darkening you're seeing is due to the high water content of Lexol. You may not even need to wear or brush them for the original colour to come back--just give them time to dry.

If not, I dunno---never seen Lexol (brown) darken leather.
post #13274 of 19067

It can darken the leather, but just by a little bit, and will lighten up in very short time.

post #13275 of 19067

I belive so, same as B4 I suppose. 

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