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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 882

post #13216 of 19072

Tongue pads are the only thing I've found that worked. Insoles crunch my toes and fudge up the balance i.e. heel pushed up out of the heelcup, topline at an awkward height. I always have in the back of my mind how bad the tongue pad adhesive is for the lining, though.

post #13217 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post

Tongue pads are the only thing I've found that worked. Insoles crunch my toes and fudge up the balance i.e. heel pushed up out of the heelcup, topline at an awkward height. I always have in the back of my mind how bad the tongue pad adhesive is for the lining, though.

Probably the only solution that won't throw off fit significantly.
post #13218 of 19072

DW, in an ideal world, everyone would have similarly shaped feet. Give that they don't (and that we choose or can only afford, off the shelf shoes) is it not reasonable to do 'whatever it takes' to make them comfortable? Those of us with flat feet will, presumably, change the shape of our shoes, just as those with high arches will change theirs. Why, then, is it wrong for some of us to 'change the balance of our shoes' (with inserts and so on), when others (with high insteps) will change theirs, 'naturally', by just wearing them? Are those with the high arches the winners here? 

post #13219 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

DW, in an ideal world, everyone would have similarly shaped feet. Give that they don't (and that we choose or can only afford, off the shelf shoes) is it not reasonable to do 'whatever it takes' to make them comfortable? Those of us with flat feet will, presumably, change the shape of our shoes, just as those with high arches will change theirs. Why, then, is it wrong for some of us to 'change the balance of our shoes' (with inserts and so on), when others (with high insteps) will change theirs, 'naturally', by just wearing them? Are those with the high arches the winners here? 

WADR, Munky, it's not a morality play--IOW, I don't think there's anything "wrong" with doing whatever you want to with your shoes/feet. But as you yourself said, you already have all kinds of inserts. So why are you asking about other solutions?

Right or wrong aside, adding an insert inside the shoe changes the heel to ball length, the shape of the bottom and the interior volume. That's just hard, scientific, mechanical, fact. And among the results will be all those things (and more) that Jaywhyy and others have mentioned.

Seriously, if inserts work for you and you aren't discommoded in some way or the other, and aren't worried about whether you are altering the fit of your shoes...and possibly the health of your feet...then count your blessings. You have a solution, many other people don't. Except MTO or bespoke.

Please accept my apologies if this seems dismissive or brusque (I didn't mean it that way)...at times I just feel a need to cut to the heart of the matter, as who should say.
post #13220 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

DW, in an ideal world, everyone would have similarly shaped feet. Give that they don't (and that we choose or can only afford, off the shelf shoes) is it not reasonable to do 'whatever it takes' to make them comfortable? Those of us with flat feet will, presumably, change the shape of our shoes, just as those with high arches will change theirs. Why, then, is it wrong for some of us to 'change the balance of our shoes' (with inserts and so on), when others (with high insteps) will change theirs, 'naturally', by just wearing them? Are those with the high arches the winners here? 

And penises (peni?)
post #13221 of 19072

@DWFII, I have ultra high arch feet. Would wearing a normal RTW shoe make a problem? I know that standing too long in my AE shoes makes my feet crazy.

post #13222 of 19072
I have a high arch and instep. It makes for finding shoes somewhat difficult. I find that higher end brands are more accommodating. Some say stick to derbies because they are more forgiving, but I am not a huge derby fan. My Corthay's were the worst for my high instep, however.
post #13223 of 19072

At this rate, in the closer future when I am fully settled in CA I'll have to develop full investment in custom and bespoke footwear with personalized footing features.

post #13224 of 19072
Why are you moving to CA? Move to Seattle.
post #13225 of 19072

Unless Seattle snows a whole heck lot more, or else I'll run to the beaches of Santa Monica.

post #13226 of 19072

I have two reference, Pat, either sunny beaches, or snowy winter. I hate rain to the deepest, smallest veins in my body. With the growth and progress of many shoe care products, it shouldn't be a problem, however, it is disturbing my nerves way too much.

post #13227 of 19072

@DWFII for guys with an instep too high, do you reinforce the instep/arch area and strengthen it? Or what is the procedure?


Edited by traverscao - 1/20/15 at 4:01pm
post #13228 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Short of surgery or botox, does anyone have any suggestions about how to get ready made shoes, that fit,  when you have a low instep? Right fit tends to mean totally closed lacing on Oxford shoes (thus with no further chance to tighten the laces). Larger shoes or small ones clearly offer no fit at all. Any thoughts would be welcome. I remain, as always, your servant, Munky.

Look for specific lasts from makers which accommodate this.  My example would be Alfred Sargent 99 last.  For comparison, C&J 348 last (Monks) I have all straps short as possible.  Carmina Simpson (a slim last) I am fully closed at the vamp in a very snug fit. 

 

When all else fails, tongue pads and insoles.

 

Edit: Reading Patrick's post about Derby shoes also leads me to state: Oxfords for low insteps.

post #13229 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

@DWFII
 for guys with an instep too high, do you reinforce the instep/arch area and strengthen it? Or what is the procedure?

Wrong starting assumption...what is "too high?" What does it mean?

For a shoemaker...who sees feet in every possible configuration...any foot that is functional and without pain is a healthy foot--a "normal" foot.

Nine times out of ten when a customer comes in saying he has high insteps he is mistaken. How would you know if you haven't seen your own footprint as a shoemaker would record it? How would you know if you've never had bespoke shoes and spoken to the shoemaker?

The fact is that most people with supposedly high insteps just have "fat" feet.

If you see a pedograph of your feet and they are not printing...or there is a disconnect in the printing...along the lateral edge of the footprint, you probably have high insteps. Otherwise, the likelihood is small unless you want to define "high instep" simply as "I can't lace up my shoes properly."

Now having said all that, most RTW makers buy lasts and make shoes according to a statistical average--a Bell curve. Everybody in the middle gets attention, everybody else can go fish. They don't make a AA because it is not profitable to stock such sizes. Too few in the general population wear a AA. If you have a foot that is heavy in the midfoot you're gonna be out of luck in most brands. If you really have a high insteps (not pathologically so) you're gonna be out of luck. Not because a AA is not a normal foot, not because a high instep is not normal but simply because the manufacturers don't want to address the needs of people who are statistically on the extremes.

When I make a shoe or boot for someone with a "high instep" (or fat foot) I make the last to reflect those measurements. If the foot is healthy it doesn't need support or reinforcement. If the shoe fits, the foot...and its "high instep"... will take care of itself--that's what "healthy" means.

And whether it be Derbies or oxfords or pull-on boots is irrelevant.

I don't make shoes for pathological or damaged feet. I'm not allowed to in the State of Oregon.

--
Edited by DWFII - 1/20/15 at 5:25pm
post #13230 of 19072
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