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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 881

post #13201 of 19061

Pat, the Church book leather shoes you talked about the day before, how were you able to greased it? Was the finish porous?

post #13202 of 19061
I mean, I am sure it is. I put a touch obenauf's leather oil on it seemed to dry fine. FWIW, that binder stuff is touch as nails. Steven the owner of Leffot has had his pair for ages. He says he even shovels snow in them and just puts a bit of reno on them and brushes them and they look fine.
post #13203 of 19061

I have some boots in matte black Guidi calf leather.  Any suggestions on what to condition them with so as not to make them shiny and lose the matte finish?

post #13204 of 19061

Use a lotion and then shoe cream.

post #13205 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Use a lotion and then shoe cream.

 

Won't that "shine" them?  I don't want to lose the matte finish.

post #13206 of 19061

That'll give it a low shine. Or else, wear it till it breaks down LOL.

post #13207 of 19061

You can try Saphir MDO Graisse. It's a grease, so less is always best.

post #13208 of 19061

@traverscao, thanks for the suggestions!  They're Vibergs, so they'll probably last years with no care...

post #13209 of 19061

If they are Vibergs, then...

 

Saphir MDO Graisse, or Montana Pitch Blend leather dressing, in very little amount (bare finger tips, swipe over the product, then apply on the leather), then, don't forget to brush daily.

 

You'll have well nourished leather without being too shiny for your taste.

post #13210 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

If they are Vibergs, then...

 

Saphir MDO Graisse, or Montana Pitch Blend leather dressing, in very little amount (bare finger tips, swipe over the product, then apply on the leather), then, don't forget to brush daily.

 

You'll have well nourished leather without being too shiny for your taste.

 

This is a bit steep. Some guys on here have upwards of 30 pairs of shoes. If they 'brushed daily' they would hardly have time to do anything else. 


Edited by Munky - 1/20/15 at 8:47am
post #13211 of 19061
I think what he really means is brush before/after wearing them.
post #13212 of 19061

Short of surgery or botox, does anyone have any suggestions about how to get ready made shoes, that fit,  when you have a low instep? Right fit tends to mean totally closed lacing on Oxford shoes (thus with no further chance to tighten the laces). Larger shoes or small ones clearly offer no fit at all. Any thoughts would be welcome. I remain, as always, your servant, Munky.

post #13213 of 19061
Some sort of padding on the rear of the tongue might help you.
post #13214 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Short of surgery or botox, does anyone have any suggestions about how to get ready made shoes, that fit,  when you have a low instep? Right fit tends to mean totally closed lacing on Oxford shoes (thus with no further chance to tighten the laces). Larger shoes or small ones clearly offer no fit at all. Any thoughts would be welcome. I remain, as always, your servant, Munky.

 

I would say to play with some inserts..perhaps...I know AE has an Ortho insert that I love and use for varied shoes..not for the Ortho properties just to help with fit. Someone already suggested tongue pads.

 

purchased several different kids of inserts off of Amazon and a few other places...think I spent about $100 bucks on them to find what I liked but it was well worth it as I was able to dial in several pairs of shoes and boots that I would otherwise have had to sell at a big loss or not worn much due to fit.

post #13215 of 19061

Thanks, Kahuna

Yup I have tried a lot of these: orthotic inserts of various sorts, tongue pads (which always looked awful!) and insoles of various sorts. I have settled for the latter. Oddly enough, as the shoes wear in, I can often take the inserts out. I think it is probably due to the soles becoming more flexible. As you have raised this range of options, I think I will have another go at orthotic inserts! 

 

One other observation. I have noticed that heavy brogue shoes tend to have a wider 'throat' than dress shoes. This can make life difficult for those of us with low arches.

 

Thanks again.

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