or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 879

post #13171 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

I recently had success with Lexol for that purpose ...did you try Lexol firs and find the Bick did a better job?

lexol, VSC, and renovateur
post #13172 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

I recently had success with Lexol for that purpose ...did you try Lexol firs and find the Bick did a better job?

lexol, VSC, and renovateur

 

Wow thanks ...guess I will pick up some Bick4 to try on another pair of older shell's that need some love.

post #13173 of 19083

Bick 4 is available, in the UK Amazon for £94! I think I will settle for Lexol on this side of the pond. 

post #13174 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Bick 4 is available, in the UK Amazon for £94! I think I will settle for Lexol on this side of the pond. 

Man. Either the import duty is crazy or someone's price gauging the shit out of the product.
post #13175 of 19083
Has any consistency developed regarding neutral creames and waxes? I seem to find some information suggesting that neutrals are great for regular use especially when polishing a shoe where you want to retain the original color or burnishing. But, I also find information that directly contradicts that and says that it will remove the coloring and leave white residue. Which is correct? If I am to use a colored cream on a nicely burnished shoe, do I pick a slightly lighter color than the original shoe color?

I just picked up my first EG Dover in vintage Oak and thought I had my care regime worked out (use the neutrals) but every time I look into this I just have more questions. Obviously, I don't want to hurt the shoes appearance while trying to care for it.

Thanks to everyone in advance.
post #13176 of 19083

DW,

Thanks for the informative post on what stretching does. I don't have any bespoke shoes. If I did, I would never consider stretching them myself. If they needed any adjustments, I would leave that to the maker.

 

As I said, I don't have any shoes that NEEDED stretching. But I do have some that, after wearing for a while, are still tighter in the toes than I would like. So I stretch.

post #13177 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallcane View Post

Has any consistency developed regarding neutral creames and waxes? I seem to find some information suggesting that neutrals are great for regular use especially when polishing a shoe where you want to retain the original color or burnishing. But, I also find information that directly contradicts that and says that it will remove the coloring and leave white residue. Which is correct? If I am to use a colored cream on a nicely burnished shoe, do I pick a slightly lighter color than the original shoe color?

I just picked up my first EG Dover in vintage Oak and thought I had my care regime worked out (use the neutrals) but every time I look into this I just have more questions. Obviously, I don't want to hurt the shoes appearance while trying to care for it.

Thanks to everyone in advance.

The lighter color cream you use the more color you lose from not supplementing the pigments. Patina.

To retain the original color (improbable and undesirable), use a shade lighter than the stock color.
post #13178 of 19083
Gents, would anybody have a recommendation for Mrs. Hedonist? Driven mad with jealousy from my recent trickers acquisition, she now endeavors to find a pair of knee-length suede boots of similar quality (but sleeker of course). I fail to think of a recommendation for her. Any brands to get started looking at?
post #13179 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallcane View Post

Has any consistency developed regarding neutral creames and waxes? I seem to find some information suggesting that neutrals are great for regular use especially when polishing a shoe where you want to retain the original color or burnishing. But, I also find information that directly contradicts that and says that it will remove the coloring and leave white residue. Which is correct? If I am to use a colored cream on a nicely burnished shoe, do I pick a slightly lighter color than the original shoe color?

I just picked up my first EG Dover in vintage Oak and thought I had my care regime worked out (use the neutrals) but every time I look into this I just have more questions. Obviously, I don't want to hurt the shoes appearance while trying to care for it.

Thanks to everyone in advance.

Neutral cream is only best used in nourishment of heel and sole edges. The only neutral wax best for mirror shine is Glen Karen's wax. Otherwise, much of neutral polishes should be avoided. 

 

In the case of your vintage shoes, only use it once in a very long while (once per year, even). Or else, use a polish a shade lighter.

 

Any cosmetic changes won't hurt, you have to expect it as a patina.

post #13180 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Neutral cream is only best used in nourishment of heel and sole edges. The only neutral wax best for mirror shine is Glen Karen's wax. Otherwise, much of neutral polishes should be avoided. 

In the case of your vintage shoes, only use it once in a very long while (once per year, even). Or else, use a polish a shade lighter.

Any cosmetic changes won't hurt, you have to expect it as a patina.

Neutral cream is just cream without pigments. Same with neutral wax. You can always raise a shine with wax.

Vintage oak is a marketing term for EG color, not actual vintage.
post #13181 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Neutral cream is just cream without pigments. Same with neutral wax. You can always raise a shine with wax.

Vintage oak is a marketing term for EG color, not actual vintage.

Vintage was lightly surface dyed, was it?

post #13182 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Vintage was lightly surface dyed, was it?

No.

It's unfinished leather, finished after making without top coat, and burnished at the toe to make it darker. It came dyed.
post #13183 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallcane View Post

Has any consistency developed regarding neutral creames and waxes? I seem to find some information suggesting that neutrals are great for regular use especially when polishing a shoe where you want to retain the original color or burnishing. But, I also find information that directly contradicts that and says that it will remove the coloring and leave white residue. Which is correct? If I am to use a colored cream on a nicely burnished shoe, do I pick a slightly lighter color than the original shoe color?

I just picked up my first EG Dover in vintage Oak and thought I had my care regime worked out (use the neutrals) but every time I look into this I just have more questions. Obviously, I don't want to hurt the shoes appearance while trying to care for it.

Thanks to everyone in advance.

I only use neural for my polish and wax needs. Having a matching colored polish/wax for each of my pairs just seems like a marketing gimmick.
post #13184 of 19083

Posted by @DW about shoe streching:

 

5--Unanswerable. Since the heel is reinforced and stiffened there is probably little to no stretch available without damaging something. Other areas, it depends on the leather...what's left after lasting. Anyone stretching needs to be able to judge when the leather is approaching its limits. This is not always...or very often...easily seen or apparent. Once the leather is stretched beyond its limits the fiber mat starts breaking up and the leather is near-as-nevermind ruined.

 

Hi DW, I was just thinking that since most RTW and MTO good leather shoes are HEEL and TOE reinforced with no flexible plastic/celastic stiffeners, then trying to strech their lenght (and the widht of heel and toe areas where the stiffeners rest) would be another main issue wich leads to  ruin them. May be those hi-ended shoes constructed with leather/felt stiffeners should admit some extend of lenght streching (and widht streching on those two areas), taking into account leather is malleable to a very little extend?.

 

Thanks again to you and to Nick´s for sharing your valuable knowledge.  I believe we all SF members deeply appreciate both points of view/expertise/knowledge and experiences.:cheers:

post #13185 of 19083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Posted by @DW about shoe streching:

Hi DW, I was just thinking that since most RTW and MTO good leather shoes are HEEL and TOE reinforced with no flexible plastic/celastic stiffeners, then trying to strech their lenght (and the widht of heel and toe areas where the stiffeners rest) would be another main issue wich leads to  ruin them. May be those hi-ended shoes constructed with leather/felt stiffeners should admit some extend of lenght streching (and widht streching on those two areas), taking into account leather is malleable to a very little extend?.

Yes, that's right. You have envisioned it exactly right. Think of it as trying to drive down a short hedgerow lined lane with a brick wall at either end. You might be able to swerve off to either side but running head on (or backing) into the brick walls is an exercise in futility. Unless you're driving a bulldozer and don't care if the brick walls are destroyed.

But even leather toe and heel stiffs are near-as-nevermind unstretchable--physically they are probably thicker than celastic and are pasted in-between the lining and the upper, so...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**