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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 858

post #12856 of 19072

And, @Kahuna75, it takes a lot to care for smooth calfskin, but if done right, it can go for quite a while - not as long as shell, to me, but at the very least, long enough for a month without polishing. 

post #12857 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Geez with everything you post in this thread about caring for calf skin shoes...to then say it is easy? Lol....

Suede...no need for tins of grease, Glen Karen product, bones, dream catchers, voodoo or anything....just a little nano and away you go.

+1. Suede also looks better a bit scuffed up.
post #12858 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

And, @Kahuna75
, it takes a lot to care for smooth calfskin, but if done right, it can go for quite a while - not as long as shell, to me, but at the very least, long enough for a month without polishing. 

My shoes do not take the beating some of the folks do on hear so luckily for me not much is needed in the care department...some of boots get abused so those get taken care of but a shine on those is not important so even that care becomes routine.
post #12859 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post


+1. Suede also looks better a bit scuffed up.

You like it rough, do ya :smarmy:??

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post


My shoes do not take the beating some of the folks do on hear so luckily for me not much is needed in the care department...some of boots get abused so those get taken care of but a shine on those is not important so even that care becomes routine.

I walk a lot per day, some 20 - 30 miles, and so my calf shoe vamps flex like machines, and then there are these rainy days in Seattle, where it rains like wild piss (part of the reason why I hate it here, or else the place is lovely), and that was why I had to grease my calf shoes. Other than greasing, the reason why I put a lot of polish on them (a lot here was like fat on lean, light coats one at a time gets buffed up, not gunking goops) is because they have to look presentable. I rarely have time to care for them, and therefore sometimes it's a month without polishing or re-conditioning.

post #12860 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Geez with everything you post in this thread about caring for calf skin shoes...to then say it is easy? Lol....

Suede...no need for tins of grease, Glen Karen product, bones, dream catchers, voodoo or anything....just a little nano and away you go.

I have a pair of C&J double monk straps. Med. brown suede. Always get compliments on them. Just brush them out, put them in trees and bags. It's easy for next use.....
post #12861 of 19072

Congrats. Many had great experience with suede, I see. 

 

I was always an oddball... 

post #12862 of 19072

Wait!!! Hold on a sec!!! @patrickBOOTH, I found something that helps with the crust calf thingy - http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?99710-Custom-Calf - DW said here that crust calves are uncolored veg tanned. I hope it helps.

post #12863 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Geez with everything you post in this thread about caring for calf skin shoes...to then say it is easy? Lol....

Suede...no need for tins of grease, Glen Karen product, bones, dream catchers, voodoo or anything....just a little nano and away you go.

+1, I find suede quite easy to care for. I think I have 14 pairs of suede shoes/boots/loafers and they take much less effort to maintain than calf. Spray 'em with NanoProtector and whenever they get spots use the little eraser thingy and a suede brush. Every year before fall I'll use a little Omni'Nettoyant and clean up all my suede and my wife's as well, then respray with NanoProtector. Done.
post #12864 of 19072
Re: bleaching suede or any leather...

Many things can be done to shoes or leather but the real question is always "should it be done?"
post #12865 of 19072
Fwiw, leather doctor's hydrator and fatliquor conditioning regiment can be used on suede as well as calf. It's not going to turn your shoes into a greaseball and waterproof them as well though.
post #12866 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Re: bleaching suede or any leather...

Many things can be done to shoes or leather but the real question is always "should it be done?"

 

In one of J Fitzpatrick's post in his blog, he diluted bleach in large amount of water and used it to strip and refinished a pair of smooth leather shoes. I was just wondering if the same principle can be applied to suede, if it helps any. Well, looks like that's gone for now.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Fwiw, leather doctor's hydrator and fatliquor conditioning regiment can be used on suede as well as calf. It's not going to turn your shoes into a greaseball and waterproof them as well though.

It's fatliquor - emulsified oils, so, you got point saying that it won't bear the risk of producing a surface residue.

post #12867 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post


It's fatliquor - emulsified oils, so, you got point saying that it won't bear the risk of producing a surface residue.

Nope, the hydrator product is designed to remove the surface residue left over from what isn't absorbed. The hydrator is pretty awesome, it relaxes creases allowing for better absorption of the fatliquor and to plump it up a bit. It is a remarkable product really. It also keeps the leather in a pH safe state so it can hydrogen bond with the fatliquor.

I think you should be careful with putting these heavy oils and such on chrome tanned shoes. Anything that over softens leather is going to turn the fiber much looser than it was intended, which means breakage. There's a fine line between conditioned and just saturation. I had the mindset you have and I used to use heavy stuff on the vamps of some shoes in the past and low and behold the broke down. Think of cardboard when it gets wet, it just turns to mush and can tear right apart.
post #12868 of 19072
I actually like the idea of products like Lexol and Leather Doctor because they are emulsified oils. They sink into the leather more rather than sitting on the top and since they use water there is less of a chance of over application leading to what I just described, especially in chrome tanned leather.
post #12869 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

he diluted bleach in large amount of water and used it to strip and refinished a pair of smooth leather shoes. I was just wondering if the same principle can be applied to suede, if it helps any.

It bears repeating...Many things can be done to shoes or leather but the real question is always "should it be done?"
post #12870 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Nope, the hydrator product is designed to remove the surface residue left over from what isn't absorbed. The hydrator is pretty awesome, it relaxes creases allowing for better absorption of the fatliquor and to plump it up a bit. It is a remarkable product really. It also keeps the leather in a pH safe state so it can hydrogen bond with the fatliquor.

I think you should be careful with putting these heavy oils and such on chrome tanned shoes. Anything that over softens leather is going to turn the fiber much looser than it was intended, which means breakage. There's a fine line between conditioned and just saturation. I had the mindset you have and I used to use heavy stuff on the vamps of some shoes in the past and low and behold the broke down. Think of cardboard when it gets wet, it just turns to mush and can tear right apart.

Here's the thing - fat on lean, but VERY thin "fat". And we gotta know what exactly was in the goop. Personally, though, I have no idea what kind of tannage AE's calf went through, therefore, I just take the risk. And I brush the shoe everyday to make sure that the stuff won't be left solid and spoil the leather from within. And I never allow much saturation of the leather (hence the fingertip swipe) - grain saturation is fine, but soggy leather - go to hell! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I actually like the idea of products like Lexol and Leather Doctor because they are emulsified oils. They sink into the leather more rather than sitting on the top and since they use water there is less of a chance of over application leading to what I just described, especially in chrome tanned leather.

Emulsified oils are awesome because of how thin they are. I usually use them before I put grease on top. In winter months I had to use real neatsfoot oil though. I don't know if AE's leather is actually chrome. They absorb moisture, and they get fairly stiff after wash. They do absorb much water if left untreated.

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