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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 856

post #12826 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Just go request MSDS from the manufacturers or importers and wear houses of you are really that curious.

I use saphir dubbin extremely rarely. In very little amounts. It does help leather gaining some non waxy luster.

It is somewhat safe to use on dress calf, because of the consistency, like then, a light swipe with the dubbin on the fingertips can provide the leather an extra light coat of the grease, and over night the grease can well absorbed into the leather. I always use the stuff after a heavy strip-cleaning. 

 

Buffing it up after it had dried does give a pleasant experience.

post #12827 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Leather Doctor might have some decent dyes, their stuff is pretty good. I don't know the ingredients and how it compared to the old stuff however.

Dyes nowadays are mostly alcohol and chemicals. Unless we have companies who would use real blacking powder, for which I couldn't think or find one.

post #12828 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

It is somewhat safe to use on dress calf, because of the consistency, like then, a light swipe with the dubbin on the fingertips can provide the leather an extra light coat of the grease, and over night the grease can well absorbed into the leather. I always use the stuff after a heavy strip-cleaning. 

Buffing it up after it had dried does give a pleasant experience.

Post some pictures of your shoes. I am really curious how slippery they are.
post #12829 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Post some pictures of your shoes. I am really curious how slippery they are.

As per wished:

 

With flash. Little biased.

 

 

 

Without flash.

 

Those are calfskin wholecut from AE. They are under a yr old. They were cleaned recently, treated with pure neatsfoot oil, then swiped across the whole shoe with Saphir Grease.

 

I'm planning to put greasy cream on these, then a bunch of other treatments before wearing them for spring. 

post #12830 of 19073

The way how I used to mirror them. The biggest complaint I have on these would be the lace facing, where they form these ugly looking fucks as you see them.

post #12831 of 19073
Why are you putting greasy stuff on calfskin? I also think one of the reasons for your relative success doing this is the fact that AE shellacks their shoes so it's not actually penetrating into the leather very much.

Let's see these grease ball shell shoes now.
post #12832 of 19073
It's not good to mirror the vamp of your shoes.
post #12833 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Why are you putting greasy stuff on calfskin? I also think one of the reasons for your relative success doing this is the fact that AE shellacks their shoes so it's not actually penetrating into the leather very much.

Let's see these grease ball shell shoes now.

I got rid of all the pre-existed finishes long ago, when I first got them. I don't appreciated pre-existed factory finishes. 

 

You should have seen the shoes when they came back from the recraft. AE apparently dumped fuck load of finish on the shoes. The whole shoes were damn sticky, and the heel & sole edges were rough as raw leather.

 

The shells are under treatment right now. I'll post before and after pics as soon as I finished dealing with them.

post #12834 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It's not good to mirror the vamp of your shoes.

Experienced that... It cracked when I walked... Luckily the remaining mirrors were still retained until weekend.

post #12835 of 19073

A word of precaution when one wants to grease their calfskin shoes though - you always HAVE TO spare the shoes SUFFICIENT time for it to absorb the grease. Soon as it is fully absorbed (thin coarse layer of fat deposited on top), BRUSH the energy out of your arms, first with a coarse brush, then with a smoother, finer brush, until the surface is smooth. Normally, if you touch the shoe at this point, it will take fingerprints. Unless it feels ultra greasy, keep brushing. 

 

Reno is a good polish after greasing. Two coats of Reno, with time to dry, and your shoes are well nourish and smooth enough to rebuild the finish.

 

One tip for effective polishing - deploy chamoisine skin into use. After creams were let dry and brushed, always buff with chamoisine to smooth the surface to damn near perfection. This is relevant to the greasing step above, as it will smoothen the finish further, prevent any possible stickiness from taking place.

 

If you are wearing AE's shoes, make sure the finishes are washed or stripped off before proceed. (Personally, I have a grudge against the sticky finish they wank on the leather)

post #12836 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Why are you putting greasy stuff on calfskin?
+1. Sorry, I'm just getting caught up on this thread, but @traverscao I guess I'm not sure what exactly you're trying to accomplish with this.
post #12837 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post


+1. Sorry, I'm just getting caught up on this thread, but @traverscao I guess I'm not sure what exactly you're trying to accomplish with this.

Thanks for asking, Fred. 

 

Most of these calfskins used by AE aren't vegetable tanned. They were tanned (by unknown method - apart from Horween shell, I've never known of where they obtained their calfskins), then fat liquored, or wet stuffed, depends on the manufacturer; sometimes left as is. The main thing is, these kinds of stuffing will not last long, and the unstuffed ones won't last. Unlike St. Crispin's crust calf, which was vegetable tanned, then hot stuffed and curried (hence why they said "almost every leather had a specific amount of grease worked in at the tannery in their PDF care guide), AE's calf would have required a lot more care, which is frustrating. I usually go for a month or over without replenishing nourishment to my shoes (I can only spare time whenever I can, and most other times would be brushing), and if I neglect doing so, I may experience cracking, or even deterioration of the leather. Therefore, there is a point in doing this, which will a). prolong the life of the shoes and b). allow negligence in care and maintenance without suffering catastrophic results in the long run. Greasing also aid waterproofing, although the cost is that instead of water soaking in and disappear, they can form unsightly bumps.

 

Perhaps I look out too much for the long run, which make things look slightly ridiculous, however, through the test of time, I believe there are indeed a benefit in doing what I am doing right now.  

 

I hope that helps. Keep asking if you need further explanations. 

post #12838 of 19073
You're confusing tannage with how a leather is nourished after tanning. You can have a hot stuffed non-veg tanned leather. In fact through email Nick Horween was telling me that the result is similar, but how you get there is different. Do certain tannages typical get nourished in certain ways? Yes, but there are a lot of reasons for that. In general chrome tanned leather gets a certain nourishment for a reason there isn't one that's inherently better. I think you're approaching all of this a bit wrongheaded. In one breath you agree with less is more and then you're stripping finishes and greasing and polishing shoes every day. I know plenty of people who essentially do nothing to their calf shoes and have had them for ages.
post #12839 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Unlike St. Crispin's crust calf, which was vegetable tanned, then hot stuffed and curried (hence why they said "almost every leather had a specific amount of grease worked in at the tannery in their PDF care guide),

I also don't think this is true. St. Crispin's crust calf shoes (I have many) don't display the characteristics for veg tanned leather. I could be wrong, but if you're basing that on their pdf on their website I wouldn't put much faith in it as I have spoken with Philip many times about shoe care and he has contradicted things in it. My guess is that is left over from before the company was his, or he didn't write it.
post #12840 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You're confusing tannage with how a leather is nourished after tanning. You can have a hot stuffed non-veg tanned leather. In fact through email Nick Horween was telling me that the result is similar, but how you get there is different. Do certain tannages typical get nourished in certain ways? Yes, but there are a lot of reasons for that. In general chrome tanned leather gets a certain nourishment for a reason there isn't one that's inherently better. I think you're approaching all of this a bit wrongheaded. In one breath you agree with less is more and then you're stripping finishes and greasing and polishing shoes every day. I know plenty of people who essentially do nothing to their calf shoes and have had them for ages.

 

Well I don't see that happen in later AE shoes. Their calfskins were dumped with cosmetic products on, so much that the surface is sticky. I only grease them per heavy clean-stripping sessions. Other than that, I don't have the time to afford for daily care - and we know what daily polishing can do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I also don't think this is true. St. Crispin's crust calf shoes (I have many) don't display the characteristics for veg tanned leather. I could be wrong, but if you're basing that on their pdf on their website I wouldn't put much faith in it as I have spoken with Philip many times about shoe care and he has contradicted things in it. My guess is that is left over from before the company was his, or he didn't write it.

I hope I have the right source at hand about all crust calf being vegetable tanned. Otherwise, chrome tanning produce wet blue hides, not natural coloring hides. I wonder if vegetable tanned skins were also better nourished than chromed skins, because that was what I generally saw and the way how veg tanned leather can absorb more oils and grease kinda gave that away.

 

Here is the site I looked at - http://www.jarnaginco.com/leather%20definitions%20index.htm - I'm not saying that this is 100% reliable, because I have no way to verify what was written, but it is certainly worth having a look at.

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