Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 854

post #12796 of 19859
It's perhaps worth noting that while shoes evolved and were designed for functionality first and foremeost, almost all craftsmen take pleasure in making function beautiful.

Look at armour (which shoes are...kind of, sort of...also). Why go to the trouble to engrave it...often lavishly and abundantly? At first it was probably chicken scratching to to dull the shine...so that it would not reflect the sunlight and give away your position. Then later comes the repousse and the inlay and the rampant griffins.

Or how about the "broguing" on this pair..nevermind the engraving or the rope twist along the bottom....

But in the end what is it? Armour, that's what...and functional, as armour.



PS...you can enlarge that photo three time and it will fill the average screen--to see the exquisite details (for those interested).
post #12797 of 19859

Just want to say thanks to those that suggested Lexol and those that mentioned using it on shell...had a pair of shell boots that were dry and rough from the factory and brushing and saphire cordovan crème did not really help much.

 

I wore the boots through the recent rain, snow and tons of salt out by my work and figured...what the hell they are going to be beaters...they have lug bottoms so why not use them.

 

This morning before lexol

 

Left boot treated...drank the stuff in

 

then after several hours of dry time and a lot of brushing

 

 

 

The shell feels much better and healthier...no clue if there is any long term effect but these boots are made for getting after it, so I am OK with it.

post #12798 of 19859
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


What do you mean? In the last year four of my pairs went back for a resole. A hole developed recently in a fifth pair that I need to bring back to Leffot now too.
Yeah, soles last me about a year, give or take.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

At least pB's and mine Saint Crispins went back for factory resole over the past year.

 

I thought pB's comment to DW was about St.C's practice of hand stitching the sole on a resole vs the hand crank machine; I thought he was asking about how that made sense or if that was odd.  And I made me wonder, of all the shoes that come out of the factory, what percentage actually go back to the factory for any kind of sole work?  If it is as small of a number as I assume it is, perhaps hand the hand stitching operation isn't that big of a deal.  

 

Of course DW later mentioned the point about hand stitching to avoid making new holes in the (welt?), which makes perfect sense. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Itsuo: "I would say just don't ever get them wet in the winter.

 

I would have thought that, unless you live in a dessert, it would be impossible not to get shoes wet occasionally. Do you wear the galoshes every day in the winter, in case it rains?

 

I sometimes think we lose the plot and forget that our shoes also have a functional use - wearing on the feet as protection against the elements. 

 

It's a good point Munky! I believe in their functional use, which is why I insist on wearing them all day instead of just keeping them at work or carrying them in my bag.  

 

Perhaps I should have said, try not to get them wet when there is salt on the roads. I don't care as much when there isn't salt out on the roads.  As soon as they start putting salt down, I do exactly what @JSlice26 said and I check the weather before going out as well as just carrying my galoshes in my work bag.  After all, what's the point in having nice things if you are not going to take care of them?  

 

We do not get a lot of snow here, so I end up wearing galoshes or carrying them around a few times a month in winter/spring.  I do plan to get a pair of dress boots in the future made of a some kind of grained leather that may not to need as much attention.   

 

In the warmer months I'm lazier, sometimes to my chagrin.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSlice26 View Post
 

 

It's not that hard. I just make sure to give the forecast a good lookover before I decide what shoe I'm going to be wearing, but sometimes you get stuck.

 

Yes, shoes have a functional purpose, but I do not buy dress shoes to satisfy those more basic purposes

 

Agreed.

post #12799 of 19859
So you're assuming people who need resoles aren't sending them back to St. Crispins?
post #12800 of 19859
I would be surprised if more than one-thirds of the shoes needing resoles actually go back to SC.
post #12801 of 19859

What's the collective here think about Alden Leather Defender?

 

 

Have you used it?

 

Would you use it?

 

Does it work?

post #12802 of 19859

I bet it has got something to interact with the acrylic coatings on Alden.

 

It's kinda funny, because Alden themselves were the ones who told people not to use any kind of waterproofing spray on their shells.

post #12803 of 19859
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

I bet it has got something to interact with the acrylic coatings on Alden.

 

It's kinda funny, because Alden themselves were the ones who told people not to use any kind of waterproofing spray on their shells.


I'm considering using it on calf.

 

 

I heard it kind looks or feels like armor all????


Edited by dddrees - 1/8/15 at 7:21pm
post #12804 of 19859
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post
 


I'm considering using it on calf.

 

 

I heard it kind looks or feels like armor all????

Don't try. It won't do any good to your shoes at all.

 

I'd recommend Glen's waterproofing cream, but it's up to you.

post #12805 of 19859
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Don't try. It won't do any good to your shoes at all.

 

I'd recommend Glen's waterproofing cream, but it's up to you.

Is this similar to HDLP or Snoseal?

post #12806 of 19859
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post
 

Is this similar to HDLP or Snoseal?

It's an all natural shoe polishing cream, with waterproofing ingredient added. It isn't greasy or oily, although you have to let it dry a little longer than other known shoe creams (applies to both lines of shoe cream from Glen Karen). Its waterproofing capability is excellent, though, on par, or higher than some grease and dubbins on the market.

post #12807 of 19859
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

Is this similar to HDLP or Snoseal?
Nothing like it. That stuff uses a physical barrier predominantly wax to keeping water at bay, Glen's cream uses a chemical barrier as to not smother the leather. Read about it.

http://oldleathershoe.com/wordpress/?p=1476
post #12808 of 19859
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

It's an all natural shoe polishing cream, with waterproofing ingredient added. It isn't greasy or oily, although you have to let it dry a little longer than other known shoe creams (applies to both lines of shoe cream from Glen Karen). Its waterproofing capability is excellent, though, on par, or higher than some grease and dubbins on the market.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Nothing like it. That stuff uses a physical barrier predominantly wax to keeping water at bay, Glen's cream uses a chemical barrier as to not smother the leather. Read about it in his old leather shoe blog.


I'll have to take a look see.

 

 

Thanks for the recommendation.:cheers:

post #12809 of 19859

Sodium Bentonite. 

 

It would be a greater deal using it for a grease or dubbin, as it will enhance the waterproofing capability to invincible. 

post #12810 of 19859
Why do you use the term "grease"?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**