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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 848

post #12706 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


That sounds awful.

I was heartbroken to know of the truth...

post #12707 of 19040
DW, curious if you took a gander at that Crispins video I posted. There were some steps in that where I had no idea what was happening.
post #12708 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've noticed that rubbing beeswax based polishes with a bone just kind of smudges things up rather than polishes.

Well, the wrong idea is how people rub the polish with the bone, when the bone was primarily for the restoration of the leather, not to apply polish. The bone may polish the leather, in the case of waxed calf, as in the polish applied, then bone to a shine.

post #12709 of 19040
That's what I mean, polish already applied to a shoe and then boning seems to just smudge it up, then again I have never spent too much time with it, so maybe just more "boning" is needed to raise a shine. (tehehehehehe!!!!)
post #12710 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

That's what I mean, polish already applied to a shoe and then boning seems to just smudge it up, then again I have never spent too much time with it, so maybe just more "boning" is needed to raise a shine. (tehehehehehe!!!!)

A bone rubbed on damp veg tanned leather will burnish and shine it. On Traditional Waxed calf, the same concept is employed but a "sizing" is added to bind the loose fibers together and to aid in raising the shine. Shoe polish or wax is incidental--beside the point.

--
Edited by DWFII - 1/5/15 at 7:19am
post #12711 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

DW, curious if you took a gander at that Crispins video I posted. There were some steps in that where I had no idea what was happening.

I did...give me a time setting (and maybe a link back to the video) and I'll see if I know what is going on and try to explain. I thought I recognized everything in the video but I don't do everything the way they do.

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post #12712 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

That's what I mean, polish already applied to a shoe and then boning seems to just smudge it up, then again I have never spent too much time with it, so maybe just more "boning" is needed to raise a shine. (tehehehehehe!!!!)

Well, DW did say the job was going to be quite nasty. 

 

My deer bone was sorta blackened, even when I used a wax dressing capable of raising a shine, not paste wax polish, which could have messed up further.

post #12713 of 19040
At like 1:56 the woman feeds the uppers through some sort of weird machine, but I can't tell what the purpose is. Right after it looks like she is skiving? the uppers around the edges to maybe make them thinner? Is that what's happening there? For what, so the pattern edges lay flatter?
post #12714 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

At like 1:56 the woman feeds the uppers through some sort of weird machine, but I can't tell what the purpose is. Right after it looks like she is skiving? the uppers around the edges to maybe make them thinner? Is that what's happening there? For what, so the pattern edges lay flatter?

The machine is known as a "Bell skiver." I have two of them. They are extremely useful when used judiciously. But they can "eat" a shoe pretty quickly. And they can also leave a ridge" where the edge of the blade passed. So she's cleaning up the skive...looks like she's widening and leveling it...by hand, where more control can be brought to bear.

As for why the edges are skived...because in every instance the leather will be laying over, or under, another piece of leather. Without the skives, there would be lumps and the shoes would be uncomfortable.
post #12715 of 19040
I got you, thanks for the explanation. Anything jump out at you as being odd to you, or significantly different from your process?
post #12716 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I got you, thanks for the explanation. Anything jump out at you as being odd to you, or significantly different from your process?

At first blush, no. I'd have to go back and review the whole vid with a more critical eye.

That said, I don't peg the waist of my shoes. I do peg the waists of my boots...sometime the whole outsole. But I like a welted waist on shoes.
post #12717 of 19040
I think it is interesting that Justin Fitzpatrick discovered that when they do a resole, which is a half resole due to the pegged waist they hand stitch the outsole to the welt rather than using the hand cranked machine when putting on a full sole.
post #12718 of 19040
I would say the thing that jumped out at me is the amount of trimming everything gets before a finished shoe is born. From the inseam to the welt, to the sole, and the heel stack. I would think it incredibly difficult to know what is right and not over do it.
post #12719 of 19040
A few things jump out at me...I use a thicker insole and don't use the fiberboard heelseat reinforcement. I temper the insole and mold it to the bottom of the last. When I make my holdfast I don't remove a wedge of leather in the channel. No staples or cork used here.

It's a well made shoe.
post #12720 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think it is interesting that Justin Fitzpatrick discovered that when they do a resole, which is a half resole due to the pegged waist they hand stitch the outsole to the welt rather than using the hand cranked machine when putting on a full sole.

Hand stitching preserves the old holes in the welt and prevents new ones from being made.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I would say the thing that jumped out at me is the amount of trimming everything gets before a finished shoe is born. From the inseam to the welt, to the sole, and the heel stack. I would think it incredibly difficult to know what is right and not over do it.

Well, that's why shoemaking is called "The Art and Mysterie." Just takes time in harness.
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