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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 846

post #12676 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It has got nothing to do with oils. This all happens on the vamps as well as the captoe and heels which never see conditioner of any kind. It's water getting caught in the wax along with whatever else is in the water. This doesn't happen with calf and is endemic to shell for reasons unknown. The leather doctor stuff I use is emulsified and the coconut oil in Glens stuff is raw so I get the best of both (and the worst of both). I've tried his waterproof stuff on my shell shoes. Completely stripped them down applied it liberally and while water did seem to bead a bit more it still left the marks. I've exchanged some emails with him about it. I am using it on my rainy day beater shoes and while it does help wick moisture you're still stuck with having to clean the city streets off of them that gets kicked up onto the uppers, which honestly imo, is the problem with wearing leather shoes in the rain, not so much the water itself.

For the bold section:- hot-stuffed, jack-glazed muscle sheath is the prime reason, and somehow the stationary moisture in shell isn't enough.

 

Are the markings really that hard to remove, even when the waterproofing cream was applied? And as of what was in rain's water, I can name acid for one. 

 

Other than that, I am kind of speechless. Do you know if there is a specific type of shell St Crispin used? I know from Horween, but I wonder if the inspection process of the hide - i.e. the criteria set - has got something related. 

 

I've been known as an idiot who used grease and wax based dressings on shells and I haven't seen a spot so far. I know rain water and puddles can make shell looking ugly, but throughout walking under the rain and cleaning the shell with water, even, I haven't yet to experience any kind of nasty spotting on the surface.


Edited by traverscao - 1/4/15 at 5:43pm
post #12677 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I've been known as an idiot who used grease and waxes on shells and I haven't seen a spot so far. I know rain water and puddles can make shell looking ugly, but throughout walking under the rain and cleaning the shell with water, even, I haven't yet to experience any kind of nasty spotting on the surface.

What is wrong with using waxes?
post #12678 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post


What is wrong with using waxes?

The kind of heavy wax based dressing, not wax paste polish.

post #12679 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

For the bold section:- hot-stuffed, jack-glazed muscle sheath is the prime reason, and somehow the stationary moisture in shell isn't enough.

Are the markings really that hard to remove, even when the waterproofing cream was applied? And as of what was in rain's water, I can name acid for one. 

Other than that, I am kind of speechless. Do you know if there is a specific type of shell St Crispin used? I know from Horween, but I wonder if the inspection process of the hide - i.e. the criteria set - has got something related. 

I've been known as an idiot who used grease and wax based dressings on shells and I haven't seen a spot so far. I know rain water and puddles can make shell looking ugly, but throughout walking under the rain and cleaning the shell with water, even, I haven't yet to experience any kind of nasty spotting on the surface.
I've owned shoes from Horween Shell from a few different makers (never Alden) and all have behaved the same. Acid in water won't leave a mark, but dirt and minerals may. It doesn't change the fact that it only happens to shell when both my shell and calf shoes are treated the same. The pH of rainwater in NYC is about 4.5, not nearly acidic enough to do damage into itself. In fact, it's actually better for leather than pure rainwater with the pH of 7.

It's not that it is hard to remove water spots on shell because it isn't, it's just the fact that you have to that's annoying. A swipe with a solvent and then a polish gets rid of it, but it's a huge pain in the ass to do for simple things like taking out the garbage in intermittent drizzle, or dribbling water on your shoes after washing your hands at the sink.
post #12680 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I've owned shoes from Horween Shell from a few different makers (never Alden) and all have behaved the same. Acid in water won't leave a mark, but dirt and minerals may. It doesn't change the fact that it only happens to shell when both my shell and calf shoes are treated the same. The pH of rainwater in NYC is about 4.5, not nearly acidic enough to do damage into itself. In fact, it's actually better for leather than pure rainwater with the pH of 7.

It's not that it is hard to remove water spots on shell because it isn't, it's just the fact that you have to that's annoying. A swipe with a solvent and then a polish gets rid of it, but it's a huge pain in the ass to do for simple things like taking out the garbage in intermittent drizzle, or dribbling water on your shoes after washing your hands at the sink.

I know it's painful, and as of all of the dilemma you had above, I happened to experienced all of them, but not with shell, with calf, actually.

 

Would daily brushing get rid of the spots and drizzles?  What brush did you used for the task?

post #12681 of 19038
Brushing does nothing with the spots. How many times over do I have to say the same thing? I'm not distraught, I'm just over shell. The novelty has worn off and the benefits don't outweigh the costs by any stretch of the imagination.
post #12682 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Brushing does nothing with the spots. How many times over do I have to say the same thing? I'm not distraught, I'm just over shell. The novelty has worn off and the benefits don't outweigh the costs by any stretch of the imagination.

Oh well, don't mind the stupid question then haha...

 

As of replacement what have you got in mind?

post #12683 of 19038

I am dying to try out reversed waxed calf though, regarding the matter of something that can compete with shell. 

post #12684 of 19038
I'm not replacing my shell, I just won't get new ones.

Traditional reversed waxed calf sounds great, but apparently it doesn't exist anymore. Won't take a shine either I'm sure.
post #12685 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I'm not replacing my shell, I just won't get new ones.

Traditional reversed waxed calf sounds great, but apparently it doesn't exist anymore. Won't take a shine either I'm sure.

Wo ho ho hold on their Pat! Big mistake thinking that the good old hide won't reflect! - http://horacebatten.com/boots/wax_calf_riding_boothttp://www.styleforum.net/t/354137/leather-quality-and-properties/200_100#post_6505402 - check those out. Perhaps traditional reversed waxed calf shines even brighter than shell in certain instances. 

 

I know a few English boot makers are still around and at large with this hide, but it's all a hell to find them. 

 

And ignore the Horween stuff in the post, please. We all know it was an unsuccessful replication of the original leather.

post #12686 of 19038

http://www.gentlemansgazette.com/riding-boots-leather-horace-batten/ - apparently they are still making boots outta reversed waxed calves. But I was wondering if the leather is reserved to just riding, tall boots.

 

http://carreducker.blogspot.com/2014_03_30_archive.html - this article written by Carreducker was the article that sparked much hope for me. @patrickBOOTH take a look at this, as wish.

post #12687 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

judging from the photos i cant see any fitting problems  of the shoe trees maybe a size bigger!btw you have to have the laces fasten or at least looped when you have shoe trees in them!! what's the  signs that makes you wonder?

 

Jimmy i think they are just perfect!!  Not long for sure!!!

i think DWfii ll be a better judge  of the photo

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post



Sad to say, no one can judge fit from a photo...not with any certainty. All you can say is that on a medium round toed shoe the "given wisdom" (Sabbage, et al) is that there ought to be roughly one inch clearance from the end of the toes to the inside wall of the shoe...depending on your definition of "medium round."

Wider toes less, narrower toes more, extended toes more.

That said, the length of the foot is of little or no importance. The real criteria for fit in this context is the heel to ball length on the foot relative to the heel to ball length on the last.

 

I suspect that the shoes may be a slightly too long. The crease on the right shoe is 'digging' onto my big toe. Below are pictures after half a day and a full day (same day) respectively. As can be seen in the second picture, the crease on the right shoe is deeper that the left shoe. Any other reasons for this occurrence apart from the shoe being too long or my feet not fitting the last?

 

post #12688 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmycth View Post

I suspect that the shoes may be a slightly too long. The crease on the right shoe is 'digging' onto my big toe. Below are pictures after half a day and a full day (same day) respectively. As can be seen in the second picture, the crease on the right shoe is deeper that the left shoe. Any other reasons for this occurrence apart from the shoe being too long or my feet not fitting the last?

Again, no certainty...but I suspect you're correct. That crease should correspond with the "joint" of your foot and the line from the medial ball joint to the lateral ball ball joint(--the "treadline." If the crease is digging into your toe, the shoe is probably creasing in the wrong spot. Sometimes this can be related to the style of shoe and the thickness of layers of leather, but from the photo the crease is in the right spot on the shoe...just not in the right spot relative to your foot.
post #12689 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Wo ho ho hold on their Pat! Big mistake thinking that the good old hide won't reflect! - http://horacebatten.com/boots/wax_calf_riding_boothttp://www.styleforum.net/t/354137/leather-quality-and-properties/200_100#post_6505402 - check those out. Perhaps traditional reversed waxed calf shines even brighter than shell in certain instances. 

I know a few English boot makers are still around and at large with this hide, but it's all a hell to find them. 

And ignore the Horween stuff in the post, please. We all know it was an unsuccessful replication of the original leather.

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

http://www.gentlemansgazette.com/riding-boots-leather-horace-batten/ - apparently they are still making boots outta reversed waxed calves. But I was wondering if the leather is reserved to just riding, tall boots.

http://carreducker.blogspot.com/2014_03_30_archive.html - this article written by Carreducker was the article that sparked much hope for me. @patrickBOOTH
 take a look at this, as wish.

So this stuff is available then. I must admit it sounds pretty awesome. I don't understand why you can't just make it yourself. Is it as simple as getting some sort of non-split veg tanned suede and waxing it? What am I missing here?
post #12690 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post



So this stuff is available then. I must admit it sounds pretty awesome. I don't understand why you can't just make it yourself. Is it as simple as getting some sort of non-split veg tanned suede and waxing it? What am I missing here?

According to DWFII, you have to mix a reasonable mixture of grease, consist of a wax, a grease and an oil, mix it hot (warm enough that the leather drinks it), then paint it on until it cannot soak anymore grease. After that, it was supposed to be left on an attic until it falls into forgotten (I'm sure it won't, coz you gotta vacuum the place and let not even one single dust to settle). After a very long time settled, it should be then scrubbed with lye soap and a type of powder blacking. Then you have to use a "sizing" product, either starch or wallpaper paste, and burnish it to the spit-shine appearance, then further polish or grease it for the best effect of the leather.

 

It should be noted that the leather must be quite thick to be tan this way, though.

 

@DWFII, help me out if I sound very silly, will you?

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