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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 845

post #12661 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

Dude, I don't think Patrick was replying to your post when he was suggesting solvents. You do not want to put any solvents on shell. Just wipe down with a damp cloth and brush. You can try a deer bone too, but in my experience the horsehair brush is your best tool for shell.

No, actually I was. Use a solvent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

HOLY SHIT PAT I MEAN "IS IT THE WORK OF ALKALINE?", NOT USING ALKALINE ON LEATHER! 

My oh my...

Is what the work of using alkaline?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Engineer View Post

I was planning to try Reno Mat

Use it sparingly.
post #12662 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Engineer View Post

I was planning to try Reno Mat

Personally, I wouldn't do it. I used to use Renovateur now and again but don't anymore. Sometimes I use Venetian Shoe Cream which I think works pretty well.
post #12663 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Is what the work of using alkaline?

I was asking if soaping and washing with soap and water would potentially bringing that kind of damage to the leather, if that was why you try to tell me that Ivory soap, or any other soap, is not suitable for leather cleaning.

post #12664 of 19040
It won't remove water spots on shell. Read back at my posts about it with pics not far back in here.
post #12665 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It won't remove water spots on shell. Read back at my posts about it with pics not far back in here.

I guess we'll have to disagree. I get lots of water spots on my shell shoes/ boots (not from piss) so I have to deal with this problem frequently. I have used the wipe down with damp cloth and brush method for years and have never had a problem.
post #12666 of 19040
If you plush your shell shoes with wax polish often these water spots won't go away with out my advice.
post #12667 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

If you plush your shell shoes with wax polish often these water spots won't go away with out my advice.

Don't know what you define as often, but I have shell shoes that I've polished with wax and some that I've left plain. I've always been able to get water spots out with a horsehair brush.
post #12668 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


Don't know what you define as often, but I have shell shoes that I've polished with wax and some that I've left plain. I've always been able to get water spots out with a horsehair brush.

You must be very convincing as you give your shoes the appropriate advice to give up the water spots.:D

post #12669 of 19040
It also depends on the maker. Alden and AE out that shellac on them, which makes them slightly water proof other makers don't which makes getting them wet a royal pain in the ass. Like I said go back just a few pages and see two examples of my shell shoes, that just a spritz of water and no amount of brushing or Reno will fix.
post #12670 of 19040

Pat, I suspect how much stationary moisture would play a role in this, too, wouldn't it?

 

BTW, AE's shell shoes were seen brushed with wax on a brushing machine, as seen by a video here 

 

http://vimeo.com/4814754

 

I know Alden used a bullshit coating. I've seen a few who owns the color 8 Indy boots whom stripped the coating away with Renomat, however, AFAIK, this is what AE used, and it explains to me so much why AE shells look so dull and I can just wash away the finish with water.

post #12671 of 19040
I haven't noticed a difference in the amount of time water has sat on my shell shoes. If I get water on them I geverally yell, "fuck!" And wipe it away immediately. There are always spots.
post #12672 of 19040

How much conditioners do you give to shell in your polishing regimen, though? Sorry if you've addressed this before, but I just need to know.

post #12673 of 19040
I vary between the Leather Doctor Hydrator/Fatliquor system and GlenKaren cream.
post #12674 of 19040

I think I kind of know what is going on here.

 

Apart from Glen's conditioner, much of any leather conditioners in the market nowadays are emulsified oils. I bet this is why you get spotting - the content does not repel water, but rather, and in fact, hook themselves up with water, and thus creates the dilemma. 

 

I've long heard of the dilemma raw oils (such as pure neatsfoot oil) can create, but it is certainly worthwhile looking at the effect of what emulsified oils could bring. I'm not suggesting one to smother up their leather footwear with grease - I wouldn't even do it myself, but I am, in fact, suggesting us to return to the "fat on lean" traditional way of applying grease to those leathers.

 

Pat, you might as well have to try Glen's new waterproofing cream, see how it works. On my AE Harrison, a distressed calf shoes, which sucks water like a sponge, Glen's new cream definitely turn the leather into a field grade waterproofing leather without losing the dressy look. The formula didn't change any much at all, except for the new waterproofing additives, and I think it is just as safe to use on shell as the old cream was.

post #12675 of 19040
It has got nothing to do with oils. This all happens on the vamps as well as the captoe and heels which never see conditioner of any kind. It's water getting caught in the wax along with whatever else is in the water. This doesn't happen with calf and is endemic to shell for reasons unknown. The leather doctor stuff I use is emulsified and the coconut oil in Glens stuff is raw so I get the best of both (and the worst of both). I've tried his waterproof stuff on my shell shoes. Completely stripped them down applied it liberally and while water did seem to bead a bit more it still left the marks. I've exchanged some emails with him about it. I am using it on my rainy day beater shoes and while it does help wick moisture you're still stuck with having to clean the city streets off of them that gets kicked up onto the uppers, which honestly imo, is the problem with wearing leather shoes in the rain, not so much the water itself.
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