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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 841

post #12601 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

The dark spot on the toe is evidence that the finish and perhaps even the leather (is it shell? if not then the grain surface of the leather) itself has been damaged. The leather in that area is absorbing wax, oils, dyes,etc., at a different / greater rate than the more impermeable leather surrounding it. It is like a very, very, superficial scuff.

If that analysis proves correct, there's not much that can be done to bring it back. Sorry. I hope I'm wrong.

This seems to be the issue. The first thing that needs to be done is the oil, or grease, or whatever is sitting in there needs to be wicked up using a solvent like Renomat or turpentine or something and allowed to dry. After that if the area is still dark applying some white vinegar on a small piece of paper towel and sticking it to the toe over the spot and pulling some cling wrap over it to slightly control evaporation and leaving it over night can help. After removing it let it sit a little while longer.
post #12602 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

This seems to be the issue. The first thing that needs to be done is the oil, or grease, or whatever is sitting in there needs to be wicked up using a solvent like Renomat or turpentine or something and allowed to dry. After that if the area is still dark applying some white vinegar on a small piece of paper towel and sticking it to the toe over the spot and pulling some cling wrap over it to slightly control evaporation and leaving it over night can help. After removing it let it sit a little while longer.

If anyone would know it's pB. He has studied on it.
post #12603 of 19067

Can I just use turpentine from the hardware store?  If so what's the best way to apply?  Thanks.

 

BTW the cobbler did the whole shoe.  I removed all the crap he put on it.  Shoes look great now, as you can see, except for the spot.  I don't know whether maybe he got them too wet when he was bulling the cap toe or what. It wasn't visible at the time because he had so much polish on there.  The cap toes had a mirror shine on them when he was done but the whole shoe was flaking like it wouldn't take the polish.

post #12604 of 19067
As one poster said before, give them a day or two. Turp might work, so would lighter fluid, or diluted acetone. You just got to put it on a piece of old tee shirt and rub it with some elbow grease. Don't go overboard all at once because you don't want to take off the dye, but give it some good solid rubs using different areas of the cloth and let it sit over night. Then do the vinegar thing with paper towel. I have done this in the past and if it doesn't make it perfect it can reduce the appearance of it. You do risk taking off dye and it might need to be blotted with some color before the polish routine is done.
post #12605 of 19067
The thing with stains is oil will leave a mark and it will need to be removed, also substances that are higher in pH than what leather likes to be at will leave a mark, so if taking out the oil doesn't make it lighten the vinegar shifts the pH back down which gets rid of the darkening due to alkaline overexposure.
post #12606 of 19067
Careful with acetone...it will strip finish like lye will strip skin.
post #12607 of 19067
This complete process of Saint Crispin's video is awesome
post #12608 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

As one poster said before, give them a day or two. Turp might work, so would lighter fluid, or diluted acetone. You just got to put it on a piece of old tee shirt and rub it with some elbow grease. Don't go overboard all at once because you don't want to take off the dye, but give it some good solid rubs using different areas of the cloth and let it sit over night. Then do the vinegar thing with paper towel. I have done this in the past and if it doesn't make it perfect it can reduce the appearance of it. You do risk taking off dye and it might need to be blotted with some color before the polish routine is done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The thing with stains is oil will leave a mark and it will need to be removed, also substances that are higher in pH than what leather likes to be at will leave a mark, so if taking out the oil doesn't make it lighten the vinegar shifts the pH back down which gets rid of the darkening due to alkaline overexposure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Careful with acetone...it will strip finish like lye will strip skin.

Another thing about acetone is that by itself has both polar and non-polar characteristics with a pH of 7, which is enough to make a mark on leather as it is. Using this would definitely need some sort of pH shifting post use. Non-polar solvents like naphtha you won't have as much of an issue because it doesn't have a pH. Orange oil (d-limonene) you have even less of an issue because although it doesn't have a true pH is slightly acidic if you were to measure the relative acidic characteristic.
post #12609 of 19067

I suspect the cobbler used an acetone based stripper to start with and stripped off the dye.  I asked him what he used to strip the shoe down and he said "deglazer."  As he was building the wax layers the shoes were...smudging...for lack of a better word.  So maybe that's what happened from him continuously stripping and re-waxing?  So maybe I will try the vinegar method over night.  

 

"You do risk taking off dye and it might need to be blotted with some color before the polish routine is done."

-if I need to blot with some color what kind of dye should I use?

 

I really appreciate everyone's help here.  I guess big lesson learned here for me that I'm better off just doing my shoes myself.  

post #12610 of 19067
Try the vinegar thing I mentioned first, if that doesn't work you might have to use some sort of solvent that I mentioned to get it out or else the spot will always be there, then after drying do the vinegar solution. I think Saphir makes aniline dyes, but check to see how it comes out first, I honestly think you should be able to use colored cream and wax to make it look better without resorting to that being that the area isn't on a place that bends.
post #12611 of 19067

The Video was outstanding....thanks for posting @patrickBOOTH 

post #12612 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Try the vinegar thing I mentioned first, if that doesn't work you might have to use some sort of solvent that I mentioned to get it out or else the spot will always be there, then after drying do the vinegar solution. I think Saphir makes aniline dyes, but check to see how it comes out first, I honestly think you should be able to use colored cream and wax to make it look better without resorting to that being that the area isn't on a place that bends.

I tried a concoction of 1 water 2 acetone before. Takes a little more time, but works as it should.

 

And, regarding the subject, that was one reason I hate light color shoes, and another set of drama preventing me from getting a shine for my shoes from anybody else but myself.

post #12613 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

This complete process of Saint Crispin's video is awesome

I just had to watch that video before I go to sleep for the whole summer, just so that you know LOL!

post #12614 of 19067

^ a simpler explanation for the darkened toe, given all teh several rounds of polishing it has gone through, is that the toe just got burnished from repeated rubbing.

 

I doubt it will get lighter if that were the case, no matter what the choice of solvent used to strip the shoe in teh future

post #12615 of 19067

Any ways of removing these raised leather spots caused by water marks?

 

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