or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 835

post #12511 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarteaga View Post


Amazon has the wipes and with Prime shipping. Just as good or stick to the liquid?

Never tried the wipes.
We buy it by the gallon and just use rags which work fine.
post #12512 of 19063

Question on suede

 

I have a medium brown brogue that I'd like to dye to Navy. I've been looking at Kellys suede dye but wonder if anyone can help teach me how to dye these from brown to navy.

 

Thanks!

post #12513 of 19063
Seeking advice on how best to care for these boots:







They are apparently 100% real leather upper, but not sure what type of leather and therefore how best to go about treating them.

The instructions provided with them helpfully states "To maintain appearance and condition treat with a suitable leather protector" ....I just don't know what is suitable.

Any help much appreciated.
post #12514 of 19063
It appears to be a flesh side out leather that was intended to be "rough and ready" looking. The velvet-y appearance of a suede or split leather was not the goal.

If you accept that analysis, you can do most anything you want with them--condition with light conditioners such as Bick4, waterproof them with ointments such as Montana Pitch Blend. Be aware that creams and ointments will mat down the nap.

If you're looking to preserve the appearance, you can waterproof and condition them with various aerosol "suede" products.

I would not use products that feel greasy or heavy in oils...the chances are high that the leather is a split and that means that it may be looser than a reverse leather. Such heavy products will only loosen the fiber mat and make the leather limp and stretchy.

Leaving them as they are...without much attention beyond a plastic suede brush, every now and again...might very well be the best bet.
post #12515 of 19063
I was reading this leather chemists forum recently, most of it is way over my head. A lot of science jargon. I know a fair bit of science, but most of what these nerds talk about is ridiculous. Mostly industry people from what I can tell and mostly about making leather, not as much about caring for it. Anyway, one of the elders on there was talking about Lexol and he said he did some work with it and it is designed to replace fatliquors in the leather that become lost over time. He also said that it is mostly water. DW said on here that he heard they added more water to it fairly recently compared with the original formula. Some might say that it was a profit boosting move, but I kind of have the feeling that it was done based on how customers use the stuff. In the original Lexol interview they seem to stress migration and how a lot of heavy oil based conditioners are greasy and attract dirt and dust and furthermore rub off of clothes. They even say Lexol won't do any of these things as long as it is applied correctly and not over used. I get the feeling that a lot of people soak leather in the stuff and then complain of build up. I think the added water counteracts the consumer's desire to overuse the product.

I can definitely tell the difference between Lexol that I have purchased at those dusty old cobbler's where the Lexol looks like it has been there a while and the Lexol I purchase at a newer looking, more foot traffic establishment. The former, definitely more "greasy". Who knows though, it might just be the age of the stuff in the bottle. I remember buying some ages ago and when I opened the bottle the entire thing was solidified like a rock inside of the bottle. Who knows what led to that.

Anyway, I found it interesting where this one particular lay person posted to this chemists forum about the care of leather sandals that would see a lot of perspiration and bad weather in South East Asia. I think the same elder who spoke about Lexol recommended either making your own polish/protector for them (because products are hard to come by out there) out of beeswax, tallow, and some kind of oil. He said the oil used won't make that much of a difference, but he leaned towards coconut oil, but guess is due to the oxidative stability of it. Anyway, the lay person said that he found a tin of Kiwi polish at a local shop. Immediately the elder said he should just use that. The lay person responded that he found online the ingredients and that there is wax, but nothing about any conditioners, or oils. The elder pretty much said waxes have been used to protect and nourish leathers forever and his "hunch" was that would be better than mixing his own concoction. I thought it was interesting given the guy's background with leather. Basically, what I took from it was the longevity of leather has more to do with the tannage, and inherent tensile strength of the leather, rather than what you slather on it after it has become leather.

Another observation that I have with natural oil based polishes is the change to them when they oxidize. I have a jar of renovateur that I have had for years. I don't use the stuff in any abundance so it lasts a long time. When you buy reno it is white, now, my reno has a yellowish hue to it. Natural oils and waxes will yellow over time with oxidation. I would think that it may not be so noticeable on shoes, especially if more polish is added and other types of solvents (even water) picks it up and moves it about the leather.

I'm aware of the concept of oxidation, but don't really understand it in terms of ill effects to waxes and polishes. I know GlenKaren exclusively uses coconut oil as a conditioner, one of the reasons for it is its high oxidative stability, as in, it sticks around for a long time. My question posed to the forum is, is oxidized wax, or oil on leather bad for it per se, or does it just lose effectiveness?
post #12516 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradp View Post
 

These museum calf carminas are on their way to me: http://www.skoaktiebolaget.se/products/carmina-oxford-in-museum-calf

 

Can I assume it's still a good fall back to use saphir reno or is there a different conditioner I should use?

 

Also, does anyone have a recommendation on what color polish I should be using for the museum calf?

you wont have any problems with using renovateur  or lexol!! renovateur wont dry out your shoes( i use it on my shoes(museum leather too) for years with no issues) !! Renovateur is a cleaner-conditioner and has wax(and mink oil) in it and after buffing it raise a good shine so you can skip the part of adding wax or paste polish ! on the other hand lexol is a conditioner and you ll need to polish after so you can raise a shine!

 

for conditioning i use  dubbin too sparingly but i have to mention that long term use ll darken the color a little bit and its a little tricky in use!

 

generally remember less is more on conditioning  part of shoe care!!

 

Patrick

if i remember correctly wax is not oxidizing!!!  Btw i think the change of color is  from the water evaporation and sovlents evaporation leading to a higher consentration of beezwax in the current solution!

post #12517 of 19063

thanks ben.  I generally try to keep it as simple as possible.

 

On my other calf shoes, I often just use a small amount of Reno and some brushing to raise a modest shine.  Just don't want to screw up the museum, but it seems like that's unlikely based on the comments I've received in response to my question. I think to start i'll try some lexol and neutral wax and maybe a few weeks or months down the road, try some reno on there.

post #12518 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

Patrick
if i remember correctly wax is not oxidizing!!!  Btw i think the change of color is  from the water evaporation and sovlents evaporation leading to a higher consentration of beezwax in the current solution!

I think you're wrong here. Waxes are composed of oils that are solid at room temperature. Oils definitely oxidize and yellow with time. I think the yellow hue is specifically because of oxidation.

Maybe @glenjay could talk more about it.
post #12519 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think you're wrong here. Waxes are composed of oils that are solid at room temperature. Oils definitely oxidize and yellow with time. I think the yellow hue is specifically because of oxidation.

Maybe @glenjay could talk more about it.

It might have something to do with purity. I have some hand rendered sheep tallow that is over 20 years old. It is as pure white as the day I got it. On the other hand, I use and like RM Williams Saddle Dressing which is, from what I understand, mostly sheep tallow. It turns yellow then brown over the course of a year.
post #12520 of 19063
Interesting.

What do you use pure tallow for?
post #12521 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Interesting.

What do you use pure tallow for?

I can't vouch for the truth of this but from what I've been told, Traditionally, shoemakers had a pot of tallow sitting by the fire--not too hot but still liquid--and they would paint or dip their insoles into the tallow to impregnate them with the tallow...which provided a nice reservoir of conditioning for the life of the shoe.

Again, I don't know the truth of the story but I did...sometimes still do...give it a try. As far as I can tell--no harm, no foul (the sample isn't large enough or over a long enough span of time).

Also tallow is one of the ingredients in some recipes for handwax.
post #12522 of 19063
The tallow wouldn't make it occlusive? I guess if it is just once it might not be that big a deal.
post #12523 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The tallow wouldn't make it occlusive? I guess if it is just once it might not be that big a deal.

Probably a valid concern. It certainly worried me when it came time to mount the outsoles...or a few other minor operations that require a paste or cement to reliably adhere.

I was given it, along with the story, some 20 years ago...I'm always game to try new (old) things, at least once.
post #12524 of 19063
I would think, although I cannot know for sure that you might be concerned that smothering the insole could make it like a wet rag with oils and could actually become not as strong for welting. I am thinking in my mind how wet cardboard will just rip easily when moist.
post #12525 of 19063
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I would think, although I cannot know for sure that you might be concerned that smothering the insole could make it like a wet rag with oils and could actually become not as strong for welting. I am thinking in my mind how wet cardboard will just rip easily when moist.

That never seemed to be a problem...although one of the reasons I was experimenting with it was that at the time I was using an insole leather that I felt was a little "flint-y."
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**