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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 828

post #12406 of 19072
Thanks guys. I just want to have something on hand for the rare occasion it comes up. I will never be the 15 brush and every color of Saphir cream person. Just the Spartan basics.
post #12407 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by mry8s View Post

Thanks guys. I just want to have something on hand for the rare occasion it comes up. I will never be the 15 brush and every color of Saphir cream person. Just the Spartan basics.

Well, for a start, you might try with Lexol, cream polish, wax polish, and cleaner and conditioner (whatevz brand have you at hand). That should go well. 

 

Try to have many brushes though. Specific roles should be assigned to different brushes, such as one for dusting, one for polishing, and one for routine brushing. Different coarseness of brushes should also matter. 

post #12408 of 19072

Mry8s: simplicity is genius. One brush to dust and brush all shoes. One brush, per colour, to polish after using cream or polish.Cream for a deep sheen, wax for a bright shine. Saphir Renovateur for cleaning and conditioning, but very rarely. 

 

It's easy to over clean and condition. Mainly, just brush, brush, brush - before and after you go out. 

post #12409 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_b View Post

I do get a kick out of the patterns. On a fairly regular basis, an individual will pop in here with question after inane question. Within a week or two, that same person is answering the next new guy's inane questions with information gathered from his own questions the week prior. The process completes the circle when the first individual starts debating the merits of shoe care with the guys who answered his questions in the first place.

This popped up again not too long ago and it's been sort of on the margins of my consciousness ever since.

My own feeling is that, while I agree entirely, there's nothing wrong or unnatural in the above scenario. That's the way people learn. Asking questions, observing, and then emulating--from childhood to (hopefully, ideally) extreme old age.

The only real problem is that, all too often, it's incomplete--the learning process is abandoned in a misguided a sense of self-satisfaction, self congratulation, and/or frustration.

And the final step--doing--is never taken

Learning anything...shoemaking, wood turning, auto mechanics...is like swordfighting tinfoil.gif :

The first time you see a sword fight the only thing you take away is the noise and the chaos and maybe who won. Subsequent viewings may increase your knowledge and understanding of the more obvious parries, etc., but it isn't until you pick up a wooden practice sword and actually set-to that you really and truly begin to comprehend the complexities.

And when you switch from wooden practice swords and all the attendant bruises, to real swords and serious danger you have to virtually re-learn everything all over again.

Actual combat adds an entire other dimension and level of understanding. If you survive, eventually you may get to the point where you can look at your opponents stance and know at a glance whether he knows what he's doing and even what possible moves he can make from that position. Similar to chess...for the master player.

Time and hands-on experience are the only factors that matter. Without them the larger picture is never seen. The swordsman who has put his time in...sweated, bled, mastered....develops an almost ineffable sense of how it all works together, of how it seems to aggregate and become more, much more, than the sum of its pieces. And how often it manifests in unlooked-for insights and comprehension that the facts and experiences...by themselves...don't necessarily reveal or recommend.

Time and experience are all that matters. Nothing else will give a person command or understanding...and without it the individual is destined (maybe even by choice) for the rear echelons (REMF).

Disclaimer...I'm not a swordman...but I can relate.

--
Edited by DWFII - 12/21/14 at 11:53am
post #12410 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Brushes aren't used for removing cream they are used to raise a slight sine and brush off small dust and dirt particles. It also spreads around the oils and waxes on the surface and lifts the microfibers of the leather.

Oh ok, I was reading this guide: http://www.hangerproject.com/shoe-care-guide/basic-shoe-care-guide/ and here they say to use a brush to remove the renovateur / creams.

post #12411 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by joachim92 View Post
 

Oh ok, I was reading this guide: http://www.hangerproject.com/shoe-care-guide/basic-shoe-care-guide/ and here they say to use a brush to remove the renovateur / creams.

Look, the guide is interesting, but not entirely 100% true. Don't take too much of the guide for granted.

 

Brushes cannot really "remove" the surface product. If the product is sitting on the surface doing nothing, yes, the brush will remove, but then again, it will gunk the brush like tomorrow is impossible to happen, and you know you're doing it wrong.

 

So, brushes and removal, not really gonna happen. 

post #12412 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by joachim92 View Post

Oh ok, I was reading this guide: http://www.hangerproject.com/shoe-care-guide/basic-shoe-care-guide/ and here they say to use a brush to remove the renovateur / creams.

I always brush after conditioning, but if the brush is removing the conditioner then you are using way too much conditioner IMO. It depends how much the leather needs conditioning, but generally for me a pea sized amount of Renovateur is plenty for an entire shoe.
post #12413 of 19072

DWF, I agree with everything you say, above; there is nothing to replace experiential learning. We (mostly) all learn from experience and that process may take a lifetime. However, it is important, in my mind, not to conflate shoe-making with shoe-care. The first is an art and a science. The latter is often a hit and miss affair. Thus, this thread. Many people on here are trying to find ways of cleaning their shoes. Some offer esoteric methods, some quick and easy and some just ill informed. It will always be the case, however, that shoe making is a far different animal to shoe care, although I see how one impinges on the other. It is a top down affair, though. While shoe makers can help shoe cleaners, I am not sure that it works the other way round.  

 

Best wishes, Munky.

post #12414 of 19072
Hanger project has some of the worst guides on the Internet.
post #12415 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I find that the Selvyt cloths work really well. My wife raises no objections to their being put in the washing machine and although you can see the 'shadows' of deep colours in them, they wash up very well

FYI, I bought a couple and tried 'em out. Pretty good stuff! I'm curious how they will clean up in the wash.
post #12416 of 19072

I think you will find that they wash up well. As I suggested, you will still see the 'ghost' of colours but they will remain great to use after a number of washes. In fact, they improve with age. I have some smaller ones to put the polish on and then a large one to give a final buff after polishing and brushing. Bear in mind that you can buy them at a very reduced price, directly from the makers.

 

http://www.selvyt.co.uk/selvyt-cloths/

 

If you want to see huge inflation of the price, try the John Lobb page. 


Edited by Munky - 12/21/14 at 11:44am
post #12417 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Hanger project has some of the worst guides on the Internet.

They once made sense to most of us, (un)fortunately...

post #12418 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

If you want to see huge inflation of the price, try the John Lobb page. 

$20 from Lobb! LOL! That's ridiculous. I ordered mine from Otto Frei which seemed to have pretty decent pricing:
http://www.ottofrei.com/Selvyt-SR-Polishing-Cloths.html
post #12419 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

DWF, I agree with everything you say, above; there is nothing to replace experiential learning. We (mostly) all learn from experience and that process may take a lifetime. However, it is important, in my mind, not to conflate shoe-making with shoe-care. The first is an art and a science. The latter is often a hit and miss affair. Thus, this thread. Many people on here are trying to find ways of cleaning their shoes. Some offer esoteric methods, some quick and easy and some just ill informed. It will always be the case, however, that shoe making is a far different animal to shoe care, although I see how one impinges on the other. It is a top down affair, though. While shoe makers can help shoe cleaners, I am not sure that it works the other way round.  

Best wishes, Munky.

I agree with you 100% That's why I x-posted it.

That said, posted it as a response to patrick-b's remarks made back in 2013 IIRC, and reposted by yet another member a couple of weeks ago.

So it kind of evolved but wasn't, strictly speaking, about shoe care at all. Just the way we look at newbies and those trying...or sometimes obdurately not trying...to learn.
post #12420 of 19072

To keep rolling on the matter, here comes another question.  I have been using for around 20 years just Saphir Creme Universelle to condition my shoes when needed (+/-3 times/year). Then I heard of Renovateur, Lexol and B4 from SF members . Which one of all of those 4 mentioned products will darken the leather less in your opinion?. Lexol and specially B4 are really priced in Spain due to shipping fees, so I decided not to go for any of both ( I believe they are similar quality products). Thanks.

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