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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 815

post #12211 of 19038

use one brush for everything. in the long run your shoes will look better.

post #12212 of 19038

Hi. Fairly new to proper shoe care - have read a ton of different thoughts on proper way to polish dress shoes. I have bought two AE brushes (one for black, one for all shades of brown) and AE premium shoe polish for each in it's recommended color - black, burgundy, walnut. I have a couple questions on the details.

 

1. Using horsehair brush to shine.I had always been a sock/T-shirt guy with Kiwi polish (wax?). Put it on, rub it even then fast polish. Looked pretty good on my cheaper shoes, maybe a bit plasticy.  With my AE shoes and the brush I can't get past a matte shine. Is it the shoes or my system? The shoes I bought are mostly good shape used shoes, so could be previous care didn't get the more polished shine. COuld be a nice pair of Walnut AE shoes isn't supposed to shine - I don't know. I know I'd like my PA dress shoes to shine a bit more.

 

Do most use brushing as the final step or is it a short step to even out the polish/remove excess before using a cloth? What is the best cloth material for the final shine?

 

My shoes look "good", especially for used shoes, I just want some to have more shine. Thx.

 

2. I bought a few pairs of used AE dress shoes that were pretty cheap, in OK condition that have what looks like piled on shoes polish in areas (could be to cover defect, but not sure). How do I remove some of the uneven buildup before the next polishing?

post #12213 of 19038
As someone who writes lots and lots of actuarial exam questions on the side I must say your ability toassemble questions is terrible! Hard to tell what is being asked and is it just the two?

jk. I use a brush for cream polish and Reno, so similar to you. Depending on the style of polish and the shoe it can produce a shiny finish. However some may consider it a nice matte finish especially compared to wax.

For wax I'll apply with a cotton tee as I do with cream polish, but will buff it with a thin cotton rag or tee and not the brush. A brush won't do justice to the wax IMO, that's why many here have fancy buffing clothes to really heat the wax and get the nice shine.

But I really only wax the toe cap so all other areas I continue just to brush. Maybe you need some wax with a polishing cloth and you'll get shinier results?
post #12214 of 19038
I've noticed that AE's are hard to get a real good mirror shine on them. My friend gave me his to polish up and it took a huge effort. I think it has to do with the finish they apply to their leathers, or from the tannery, who knows, but it seems almost like a poly coat of sorts.
post #12215 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

Generally to know , if you put the oil first and then the lotion you are completely wasting it!! oil ll prevent the lotion to get in the leather!!(99% if you apply the oil you dont need  to apply the lotion) oil(mink oil -dubbin etc) are for leather like the shoes you are posted are made off (waxy-oily processed leather in general terms:hiking boots for example) when lotions are mostly for  calf leather (like the one used on more formal shoes). hope i helped a little bit

It did help. Thanks! Pic of the final product below.

 

post #12216 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Savage View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

Generally to know , if you put the oil first and then the lotion you are completely wasting it!! oil ll prevent the lotion to get in the leather!!(99% if you apply the oil you dont need  to apply the lotion) oil(mink oil -dubbin etc) are for leather like the shoes you are posted are made off (waxy-oily processed leather in general terms:hiking boots for example) when lotions are mostly for  calf leather (like the one used on more formal shoes). hope i helped a little bit

It did help. Thanks! Pic of the final product below.

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

funky looking boots...I would break my neck in those in about 10 steps.....

post #12217 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Look for patrick_b in the thread. He had the patinations done.

 

Not me. Perhaps you are thinking of David Copeland?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

use one brush for everything. in the long run your shoes will look better.

 

 

I just find it simpler. One for black, one for everything else (brown, color 8, etc.). I wear black shoes so infrequently so the "black" brush never gets used. Even matching polishes exactly isn't all that crucial. Nothing wrong with it but I got along with black polish and brown polish for a long time.

 

For reference, the boots are color 8 shell with wax on the toe. Brown Kiwi wax and medium brown saphir glacage wax. Probably 3 thin coats of saphir and 2 coats of kiwi. As I've mentioned in the past, I didn't keep or maintain the high shine. It was an experiment more than anything.

 

 

 

And a couple of years later, they end up like this:

 

 

 

 

Regular brown Kiwi does an admirable job. These formerly owned AE's started with a burnished toe and I added 3-4 coats of kiwi.

 

900x900px-LL-c2b87bca_DSC_9646j.jpeg

 

900x900px-LL-baf86f33_DSC_9645j.jpeg

post #12218 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

funky looking boots...I would break my neck in those in about 10 steps.....

Ha. Yeah, they aren't pretty. But they are great on concrete floors, or roofs, or pavement. Great grip and all day comfort.
post #12219 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've noticed that AE's are hard to get a real good mirror shine on them. My friend gave me his to polish up and it took a huge effort. I think it has to do with the finish they apply to their leathers, or from the tannery, who knows, but it seems almost like a poly coat of sorts.

They have some sort of weird water-based coating that comes out of the factory. When that coating is rubbed off, the leather is extremely rough to handle with. I actually have to re dye a pair of calfskin after I removed the finish. The edges were also poorly finished and was dumped with ink rather than smoothen properly. 

post #12220 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Savage View Post


Ha. Yeah, they aren't pretty. But they are great on concrete floors, or roofs, or pavement. Great grip and all day comfort.

From the treatment on, just be sure to brush often. It'll get a lot better with the years.

post #12221 of 19038

To owners of Berluti shoes - what exactly is the yellowish polish that had some sort of greasy texture used by the Berlutians? Is it some sort of a grease? Or is it a kind of secret-of-the-trade polish that is yet to known by outsiders? 

 

All helps appreciated in advance.

post #12222 of 19038

its Glen Karen lemon sorbet flavored shoe cream

 

don't eat the yellow snow.

post #12223 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

From the treatment on, just be sure to brush often. It'll get a lot better with the years.

Thanks. Will do!
post #12224 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliebrown2 View Post
 

 

No effect when I tried brushed vigorously.  I'll try conditioning it to hopefully moistened it up a bit, but is there any advice on how to get rid of the water mark in the center vamp?

 

So during my last polish, my routine was: 1) wiped and brushed dust/debris 2) condition/cleaner, let dry, brush 3) AE premium polish, let dry, brush.  At the end everything looked fine and even colored, but once I wore them, the crease area started looking like it looks now where there's discoloration around the creases and what appears to be some cracking.  I wonder if something was wrong with my routine?

 

 

 

i cant be 100% sure but this looks like a mark that i had on one of my pairs , it was from the conditioner(to be 100% i have to see the shoes in person)!(it was the time when i was overdoing it with the renovateur hahahah) !! i think you applied a lot of conditioner on that area and you left it to get absorbed!! the whiter spots are where there were  more conditioner so when the rest vamp dried these areas were still "wet" and the surface tension of the liquid dragged "the color"!! try to apply a little amount of conditioner or renovateur and massage the area till all is absorbed !! with the heat of your fingers and the conditioner agents you ll even the color!! the cracking must be from the polish! i would use dubbin but its a little tricky how to use it on formal shoes!!(remember on dubbin less is more, and when i say less i mean it hahaha just pass your finger on the dubbin surface and then on the shoe, let it dry for 12-24 and then brush : if you over do it dubbin ll need maybe more than 3-4 days to completely dry)

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've noticed that AE's are hard to get a real good mirror shine on them. My friend gave me his to polish up and it took a huge effort. I think it has to do with the finish they apply to their leathers, or from the tannery, who knows, but it seems almost like a poly coat of sorts.

they have a more "raw" surface and they apply a finishing spray that if i am not mistaken has silicon in it!!(its some kind of shinning or burnishing finishing spray depends on the model)

post #12225 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

 

i cant be 100% sure but this looks like a mark that i had on one of my pairs , it was from the conditioner(to be 100% i have to see the shoes in person)!(it was the time when i was overdoing it with the renovateur hahahah) !! i think you applied a lot of conditioner on that area and you left it to get absorbed!! the whiter spots are where there were  more conditioner so when the rest vamp dried these areas were still "wet" and the surface tension of the liquid dragged "the color"!! try to apply a little amount of conditioner or renovateur and massage the area till all is absorbed !! with the heat of your fingers and the conditioner agents you ll even the color!! the cracking must be from the polish! i would use dubbin but its a little tricky how to use it on formal shoes!!(remember on dubbin less is more, and when i say less i mean it hahaha just pass your finger on the dubbin surface and then on the shoe, let it dry for 12-24 and then brush : if you over do it dubbin ll need maybe more than 3-4 days to completely dry)

they have a more "raw" surface and they apply a finishing spray that if i am not mistaken has silicon in it!!(its some kind of shinning or burnishing finishing spray depends on the model)

Regarding AE shits, it's kinda washable, so I guess water based ink was used.

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