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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 812

post #12166 of 19040

Patrick, thank you for your excellent advice about Lexol and Saphir wax, to bring my brogues back to life. I used light brown and then yellow wax and the result really is good. 


Edited by Munky - 12/8/14 at 7:58am
post #12167 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You almost had a heart attack? How old are you? In my mind you're like 22.

I'm a '83 born. Carelessness led me to such stupid incident.


Edited by traverscao - 12/8/14 at 4:33pm
post #12168 of 19040
post #12169 of 19040

I love the L'Égide video most. Especially the sound track. 

 

BTW, it's not really a "full sole".

post #12170 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post


Thanks to all for your inputs.  I leave you some links about it

Hope you like them.

Hell, now that you've seen the videos, you should be able to do it yourself.
post #12171 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Hell, now that you've seen the videos, you should be able to do it yourself.

 

Gotta start somewhere if people are really interested in shoemaking as a craft.  Except some of those videos are meh.

post #12172 of 19040
Two questions; do shoe trees really vary that much, is red cedar the best?
Woly shoe cream, any good what's it best used for?
Thanks in advance
post #12173 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Gotta start somewhere if people are really interested in shoemaking as a craft.

Sure, but there seems to be a lot of people who think just seeing something being done makes them experts.

Not that those videos have much to do with shoemaking anyway.

Food for thought?...

http://www.styleforum.net/t/354137/leather-quality-and-properties/1320#post_7553576
post #12174 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Hell, now that you've seen the videos, you should be able to do it yourself.

 

I think you are a lucky man; apassionate of your noble profession.  Envy you.

post #12175 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Sure, but there seems to be a lot of people who think just seeing something being done makes them experts.

Not that those videos have much to do with shoemaking anyway.

Food for thought?...

http://www.styleforum.net/t/354137/leather-quality-and-properties/1320#post_7553576

 

I blame Julia Child and Bob Ross.

 

But then again, I don't think anyone with any intelligent would claim themselves being expert basketball players after watching a few seasons of NBA.

post #12176 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Hell, now that you've seen the videos, you should be able to do it yourself.

Where can I buy a luxury home resoling kit including oak-bark tanned leather, hand forged needles, organic cotton thread, etc.  I see a marketing opportunity! :happy:

post #12177 of 19040
Cotton thread rots over time. Synthetic FTW.
post #12178 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Cotton thread rots over time. Synthetic FTW.

How bout waxed cotton?

post #12179 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDeKelver View Post

Where can I buy a luxury home resoling kit including oak-bark tanned leather, hand forged needles, organic cotton thread, etc.  I see a marketing opportunity! happy.gif

chuckle... I assume you know that I was being facetious.

There are a number of people who market variations of shoemaking kits and re-soling kits, etc. Carreducker among them IIRC. I'm not so sanguine on the idea. There is no one size fits all kit.

As for the thread, cotton is notoriously short fibered...less than an inch.. Linen or hemp is the Traditional materials because the fibers (the "staple") in the yarn can, theoretically, be as long as a yard in length...or more. The longer the staple the stronger the thread.

Of course, nowadays even hemp, which is touted and sold as "long fibered," seldom has a staple longer than three inches. Hence, as pB suggested, synthetic yarn (polyester) is replacing the hemp and linen among some makers. It can be waxed and handled virtually the same as the Traditional stuff. It's stronger and almost entirely rot resistant. Almost take a shoemaker to tell the difference visually.

I cut my teeth on linen and used it for 20 years or more. In fact, I still use it on occasion or the if the customer demands it. But...call me a cockeyed optimist, I prefer the poly for most hand stitching applications.
post #12180 of 19040
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


chuckle... I assume you know that I was being facetious.

There are a number of people who market variations of shoemaking kits and re-soling kits, etc. Carreducker among them IIRC. I'm not so sanguine on the idea. There is no one size fits all kit.

As for the thread, cotton is notoriously short fibered...less than an inch.. Linen or hemp is the Traditional materials because the fibers (the "staple") in the yarn can, theoretically, be as long as a yard in length...or more. The longer the staple the stronger the thread.

Of course, nowadays even hemp, which is touted and sold as "long fibered," seldom has a staple longer than three inches. Hence, as pB suggested, synthetic yarn (polyester) is replacing the hemp and linen among some makers. It can be waxed and handled virtually the same as the Traditional stuff. It's stronger and almost entirely rot resistant. Almost take a shoemaker to tell the difference visually.

I cut my teeth on linen and used it for 20 years or more. In fact, I still use it on occasion or the if the customer demands it. But...call me a cockeyed optimist, I prefer the poly for most hand stitching applications.

Any chance to improve these threads at all? 

 

I got a fairly crazy thought on silk and linen thread.

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