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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 793

post #11881 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

If it is largely due to grit, then gently removing it should cut the risk.

Still puzzled why cracking seems so rare in things like gloves, some of which live fairly hard lives.

DW, from your experience with working cowboy boots, did you see a difference in longevity based on how carefully a client maintained his footwear?

Of course, but the thing that makes the most difference...in my opinion...is keeping them clean.

That, and keeping them clean.
post #11882 of 19038

On my side the Shoe Care DILEMMA  is now over; to keep your shoes clean and handle a specific product for a specific incident/need on your shoe.  Once in a while a deep wash if necessary. Less is more.  Simple.

 

Mil gracias.

PD.-Definitely I will spend much more money on good brushes than in other products from now on.  

post #11883 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Munky,

I'm not willing to think about Christmas yet...it's too damn early and I hate the way Christmas season starts according to when the retail industry tells us it ought to start.

That said, I appreciate the sentiments.

Now to the point, I am sure that there are many skills and tools that are similar. It was almost a natural extension of what we already do for my wife to get into bookbinding.

But why is it that bookbinders don't use spoons instead of bones...in your opinion?

 

I don't really know about this, DW; it was nearly 50 years ago. Thinking about it, I would imagine that it was easier to 'control' the spatula along edges. It was never used on anything except straight edges. Or perhaps it was a method, handed down, which allowed people to say 'we have always used one of these' !  I would worry that using a spoon might not produce the razor sharp edge of leather, card and paper. 

 

What do you use the one on your bench, for, DW?

post #11884 of 19038

Ozzy, the spatula was much bigger than the one from APOS. More the size of a tongue depressor, used by doctors. I would imagine that using the APOS one would be tiring as an all-day tool. It might not have be able to cope with larger sizes of leather, card or paper. Even making sharp edges in paper requires a bit of leverage.

post #11885 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I don't really know about this, DW; it was nearly 50 years ago. Thinking about it, I would imagine that it was easier to 'control' the spatula along edges. It was never used on anything except straight edges. Or perhaps it was a method, handed down, which allowed people to say 'we have always used one of these' !  I would worry that using a spoon might not produce the razor sharp edge of leather, card and paper. 

What do you use the one on your bench, for, DW?

Anything and everything.

At my bench, I have about 20 hammers and a like amount of lasting pincers and awls, etc.. I don't have 20 hands, naturally. So why do I have them? Aside from collecting old tools, each has some aspect to recommend it over all the others. Yes, I have my favourites but I find myself reaching for one tool or the other...all of them...on a regular basis. and yes, I could probably get by with a quarter of any of those tools, without the work suffering.

I have six bones that I made myself, several hardwood rub sticks and a dozen or so metal tools that have polished faces. I use them all but I prefer the bone tools above all the others.

I don't think the metal tools...polished to a mirror shine...are as warm or, really, as smooth as the bone. I know that probably doesn't make sense to some but...well, you'd have to be there.

Anywhere I need to chase pipes and wrinkles I use the bone. Anywhere I need to burnish leather, I use the bone. But oddly enough, if I'm folding leather I use all of them interchangeably....depending on the application.
post #11886 of 19038
I met this girl who custom hand makes and binds books. She finds NOS paper and leather and makes some beautiful bespoke journals, diaries, custom albums and anything. She was telling me all about it and it was incredibly interesting. She got into it by using scraps of leather her father would have laying around as he was a leather upholstery restorer. Sounds very Dickensian I know, but it was fun to hear people out there still being creative and coming from a creative family. She was telling me about the guy who taught her to do bookbinding she said after painstakingly doing one book she felt so accomplished and her instructor, said, "Good, now throw it on that pile over there." The pile was just a pile of scrap, or "garbage". She said, "Why? I want to keep it." He said, "Not until it is perfect, now start again." I got a very DW impression from the sound of her teacher! Oh and just to add, she was super hot.
post #11887 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I met this girl who custom hand makes and binds books. She finds NOS paper and leather and makes some beautiful bespoke journals, diaries, custom albums and anything. She was telling me all about it and it was incredibly interesting. She got into it by using scraps of leather her father would have laying around as he was a leather upholstery restorer. Sounds very Dickensian I know, but it was fun to hear people out there still being creative and coming from a creative family. She was telling me about the guy who taught her to do bookbinding she said after painstakingly doing one book she felt so accomplished and her instructor, said, "Good, now throw it on that pile over there." The pile was just a pile of scrap, or "garbage". She said, "Why? I want to keep it." He said, "Not until it is perfect, now start again." I got a very DW impression from the sound of her teacher! Oh and just to add, she was super hot.

Forgive me, but there's another thread....

I'm kind of flattered to be associated with that perspective (maybe I shouldn't be?) but...and it's probably self-evident...it's all about context. The book only goes in the scrap heap if you're interested in learning something from someone. And the recommendation to throw it in the heap can only come from someone who knows you can do better.
post #11888 of 19038
Maybe he was just feeling off of sorts due to the hotness of this girl!
post #11889 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Maybe he was just feeling off of sorts due to the hotness of this girl!

fing02[1].gif

I have my share... you tend to draw them when you're perceived as "safe." That said, I'm not to old to appreciate them.
post #11890 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

fing02[1].gif

I have my share... you tend to draw them when you're perceived as "safe." That said, I'm not to old to appreciate them.

cheers.gif
post #11891 of 19038

You are a couple of randy old goats. That's not to be taken as a criticism. May as well think about your bone, even if you have forgotten how to use it. :fonz:

post #11892 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

You are a couple of randy old goats. That's not to be taken as a criticism. May as well think about your bone, even if you have forgotten how to use itfing02%5B1%5D.gif

I don't know, I'm constantly polishing mine.
post #11893 of 19038
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post #11894 of 19038
Wait! What are we talking about?

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post #11895 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Wait! What are we talking about?

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Book binding leather, CG, and spatula on them (?)

BTW, DW, another question for waxed calf - can the burnishing process be done with a burnishing wax? Or must it be the wall paste you told me?
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