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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 787

post #11791 of 19059

My CXL Indys are showing 2 holes. Is this something I should get fixed? I don't believe these were here before. If this does need to get fixed, is it something easy or does it require a ton of work?

 

Thanks!

 

post #11792 of 19059
Looks like the stitching came loose there. Probably don't have to worry about it.
post #11793 of 19059

His polish is delicious...marinated and basted my ribs with it last night...

 

post #11794 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Well, for any kind of welt, I still have to brush care product into them to protect that area, so, yah. 

 

However, tanned leather, historically, are fairly water resistance, don't you think? Apart from shell cordovan and waxed calf, nowadays I think leathers were may be well tanned, but poorly treated, therefore weakened water resistance.

 

Leathers are softened either by steam, water, or some miracle liquids, during the lasting or insole feathering process, meaning leathers are not water resistant. 

post #11795 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Sulphuric acid is also used in the tanning process during the pickling stage. In the right concentrations it is fine and even beneficial to leather. Leather likes to stay between 3 and 5 on the pH scale. Rain water throughout the country is very varied, but in NYC it is measured at about 4 to 4.5, which is fine for leather. The issue with water is the grime that get kicked up on the city streets and dirt and such. Physical particulate matter that gets in the creases. Water also will allow the oils and tannage to evaporate out faster during drying. That's the issue with water.

You're right...and my comment was misleading. I was just saying that rain water isn't distilled water, that's for sure.

That said, when I came up it was pretty well accepted that acid increased the deterioration of leather. The common wisdom was that open urinals were a major cause of cracking .

There was a study done and presented at Stanford University by Vladimir Kucera in 1988 that said "Monumental buildings and statues of stone, stained glass windows, paper, leather, paintings, museum textiles and archives are subject to accelerated deterioration from acid deposition."(pp177)

How that works with regard to leather, I don't know..."Damnit Jim, I'm a shoemaker, not a chemist!"

But rain isn't innocent anymore.
post #11796 of 19059

Glen's products are working well for me, thanks,  traverscao.

post #11797 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


You're right...and my comment was misleading. I was just saying that rain water isn't distilled water, that's for sure.

That said, when I came up it was pretty well accepted that acid increased the deterioration of leather. The common wisdom was that open urinals were a major cause of cracking .

There was a study done and presented at Stanford University by Vladimir Kucera in 1988 that said "Monumental buildings and statues of stone, stained glass windows, paper, leather, paintings, museum textiles and archives are subject to accelerated deterioration from acid deposition."(pp177)

How that works with regard to leather, I don't know..."Damnit Jim, I'm a shoemaker, not a chemist!"

But rain isn't innocent anymore.

No thanks to industrializations and excessive use of mineral coals LOL!!!

post #11798 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Glen's products are working well for me, thanks,  traverscao.

Glad it's all working.

post #11799 of 19059

I made a corresponding post in the AE Appreciation thread but I thought I may pick for knowledge here as well.

I recently picked up a pair of Allen Edmonds with a burnished finish, which from my understanding is more impermanent than that of your typical dyed leather. What is the SF recommended way to treat such a shoe? I have a collection of Saphir products; several shades of the MDO creme and wax, as well as their Renovateur and Super Invulner spray. I also picked up AEs polish to go along with this particular color as I was unsure any of my Saphir would yield a precise match.

Is there anything to be done that will preserve the color before wearing them out? How about recoloring and polishing after several wears? I am new to the burnished leather field and want to proceed with caution so as to not ruin my new shoes.

As always, thank you for all your help

post #11800 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by eibes View Post
 

I made a corresponding post in the AE Appreciation thread but I thought I may pick for knowledge here as well.

I recently picked up a pair of Allen Edmonds with a burnished finish, which from my understanding is more impermanent than that of your typical dyed leather. What is the SF recommended way to treat such a shoe? I have a collection of Saphir products; several shades of the MDO creme and wax, as well as their Renovateur and Super Invulner spray. I also picked up AEs polish to go along with this particular color as I was unsure any of my Saphir would yield a precise match.

Is there anything to be done that will preserve the color before wearing them out? How about recoloring and polishing after several wears? I am new to the burnished leather field and want to proceed with caution so as to not ruin my new shoes.

As always, thank you for all your help

 

1. use shoe trees

2. rotate between multiple pairs

3. on rare occassion, sparingly apply wax polish

 

if you want to keep the shoes original color...use a polish that is one shade lighter...or a neutral....

 

if you want to give the shoe a nice patina over time...use a wax polish that is slightly darker...or even a different color.

 

you don't need to do anything else. be wary of creams and renovateur. they are notorious for destroying shoes.

post #11801 of 19059
^Good advice except for the polish>cream imo. I'm firmly on the side that prefers creams to polish for most things, particularly keeping leather supple and giving it a nuanced color. Been using creams almost exclusively for 15 yrs or so w/ no problems. Never heard it destroyed shoes, let alone was "notorious" for it.

I like polish too, but I only use it for the toes and maybe heels of black shoes when I want to be extra spiffy or maybe give them a bit more protection from water and salt.

I've used regular hand lotion for years (any brand) after Myron Glazer said he recommends Nivea for his bags. I like it better than Lexol. But I like the Bick 4 that DW recommended best.

Would like to try Glen's stuff. But I still have a good supply of Meltonian cream and Glen's stuff is pricy.
post #11802 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

 

1. use shoe trees

2. rotate between multiple pairs

3. on rare occassion, sparingly apply wax polish

 

if you want to keep the shoes original color...use a polish that is one shade lighter...or a neutral....

 

if you want to give the shoe a nice patina over time...use a wax polish that is slightly darker...or even a different color.

 

you don't need to do anything else. be wary of creams and renovateur. they are notorious for destroying shoes.

 

I have been using Renovateur with the creme on my shoes for awhile now and haven't noticed any ill effects. How does it destroy the shoe? Now you have me worried...

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by emptym View Post

^Good advice except for the polish>cream imo. I'm firmly on the side that prefers creams to polish for most things, particularly keeping leather supple and giving it a nuanced color. Been using creams almost exclusively for 15 yrs or so w/ no problems. Never heard it destroyed shoes, let alone was "notorious" for it.

I like polish too, but I only use it for the toes and maybe heels of black shoes when I want to be extra spiffy or maybe give them a bit more protection from water and salt.

I've used regular hand lotion for years (any brand) after Myron Glazer said he recommends Nivea for his bags. I like it better than Lexol. But I like the Bick 4 that DW recommended best.

Would like to try Glen's stuff. But I still have a good supply of Meltonian cream and Glen's stuff is pricy.

 

I too prefer the look of cremes to polishes, with the exception of black shoes.

How does the Bick 4 fit into your regimen? Is that an after brush/before creme application? I am always interested in trying new things, I may have to pick some of this up.

 

Thank you guys for your help!

post #11803 of 19059

reno will dry your shoe out and the upper will crack.

post #11804 of 19059
Go back and read the shit storm that ensued with me and Copeland when I spoke about my all Saphir regimen and failing uppers.
post #11805 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Go back and read the shit storm that ensued with me and Copeland when I spoke about my all Saphir regimen and failing uppers.

I don't wanna be copeland because I read all that stuff. Still...

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