or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 784

post #11746 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

The citations that they used, are they even real, if I may ask?

I've been to all those sites at one time or the other. What citations they used are probably real and to some extent even accurate. But remember, even the vegetable tanned leathers we get today are different from the veg tans of 150 years ago.

And just to clear things up I do not doubt that cooking grease might have been used by soldiers in the field. That might have been all they had. Would you put cooking grease on your own shoes?

The black ball, I'm not real certain about. The recipe reminds me of "heel ball." Again, it's an "after market" product...maybe even a "folk remedy"...and it could have been just about anything. If someone told me their g-g-great grandfather swore by sorghum, who can gainsay that?
post #11747 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Do I have to drop my respect for you? Cause you don't seems to respect my preference. 
Do you have respect for me? I fail to see why you would or wouldn't
post #11748 of 19067

I used a combination bacon grease / maple syrup glaze to cook these badboys up last weekend. While some venerable members of this community have assured me that the true square toe last (invented, of course, by world renowned bespoke division of Allen Edmonds) is making a strong comeback...I couldn't resist the deliciousness of this fine calf leather. I made sure to tenderize the leather by scratching the hell out of it with my deerbone prior to cooking...funny I thought the deer bone was useless but it proved to be great at this! 

 

post #11749 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyJones View Post


Do you have respect for me? I fail to see why you would or wouldn't

And I thought you were respectable, for many moments, before you called me Dave.

post #11750 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Travers, do you use a different product on the shoes you wear in rainy conditions on the weekends, as opposed to the weekdays? Also, do you use a different product to protect against spring rain as opposed to autumn rain?

So, here's how I work it, Pat.

 

Calfskin shoes:

 

_For heavy weather seasons, ideally from September to mid-February, prior September begins, I strip and clean my shoes with Renomat before bath them with Murphy soap. Once done, dry and clean, I used the Saphir MDO dubbin grease for weatherproofing. Work it in great, then leave it to absorb. After two days (ideally), I brush the leather, then condition it with MDO lotion, before I hit the leather with Glen's conditioner. I rarely wear calfskins in foul weather condition, even so, Pacific Northwest rain is a killer, and by doing so, it offer calfskin shoes great protection. Further adding of Glen's polish just seals the work up nicely, and the leather just shed rain like duck's feather. The sole was heavily greased with Montana pitch blend dressing, and was intelligently left to completely dry before I walk on the wet streets. For fall and winter, calfskin shoes, if worn extensively (during when my shell boots go for a repair, if something happens), will be cared for weekly with Glen's cream.

 

When the warmer months come, it's all about taking a soft horsehair dauber, daub the shoes with water, then brush the hell out of the finish. I use cream occasionally in warmer months, however, when needed, I also have to bull with Saphir wax (only in require occasions, like black tie or semi-formal dinner). For warm season I rarely do much apart from brushing. Soles get clean and oiled infrequently. 

 

For some reason, Glen's cream protect the shoes so good that cleaning them with water would be sufficient.

 

For both seasons, brushes remains my best friend, however, chamoisine leather cloth was also extensively used during polishing. I also find cleaning the soles with water after every wear decrease the chances of them being ground to zero with sands and pebbles, which, thus, prolong their life a little bit.

 

Shell Cordovan shoes:

 

_It was rather bizarre for many to hear me greasing my shell shoes, but I gotta tell ya, it works. I used the CD Jarnagin grease (the just-found-out-it-was-quite-bullshit stuff from the link I provided to DW) and their "preservation wax" to polish and weatherproof both of my shell boots. Following successful experiences from many threaders here on SF, I also bought two bones and put them into good use. For cold weather, I only grease after two months. I wear Shell pretty heavily in cold and rainy weather. Of course, in between, it's water, dauber, and brushing. They've glow with time, use, and age. I've had problems with AE slathering their bullshit all over the boots when they had them for repair, however.

 

For warmer months, I also wear shell whenever I feel like to. I don't do anything much to them but cleaning with water, brushing, and buffing. I am thinking of using Glen's cream on them like you do, but for now I'm too in love with the finish I was given with grease and wax.

 

I hope this shares somewhat of what I do to my shoes and how they still miraculously survive, not only through my abuse on them, but also the horrible rain up here. Sometimes I said to myself, if it doesn't rain too much up here, I wouldn't have thought of moving. I prefer snow because dealing with them, in my ways, are a lot easier.

post #11751 of 19067
You're doing way too much to your shoes, man.
post #11752 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

And I thought you were respectable, for many moments, before you called me Dave.

 

Maybe you should challenge him to a duel. I heard thats what respectable gentleman do when one offends them. 

post #11753 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I've been to all those sites at one time or the other. What citations they used are probably real and to some extent even accurate. But remember, even the vegetable tanned leathers we get today are different from the veg tans of 150 years ago.

And just to clear things up I do not doubt that cooking grease might have been used by soldiers in the field. That might have been all they had. Would you put cooking grease on your own shoes?

The black ball, I'm not real certain about. The recipe reminds me of "heel ball." Again, it's an "after market" product...maybe even a "folk remedy"...and it could have been just about anything. If someone told me their g-g-great grandfather swore by sorghum, who can gainsay that?

Point taken.

 

If cooking grease did not came from bacon, was unsalted, with some funny scent to an extent, and would not rot, I would put it on. Unfortunately, if it has to be tallow, I prefer a concoction of tallow, neatsfoot oil, and an aromatic oil to thwart mold and dew.

 

Black ball is still a vague concept to me. I get the dub, the wax, and neatsfoot oil alright, but black ball seems to be a thing I'd use on inspection equipment and heel and sole edges. 

 

Dubbin was used since medieval. I bet several times they rot the troops' boots, but many artifacts survived simply thanks to dubbin concoctions. So, dubbin is rather still being controversial.

post #11754 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You're doing way too much to your shoes, man.

Yup. Miraculously, they survived, and are thriving.

post #11755 of 19067

Easiest way to shorten the life of a shoe is overly caring for it.

post #11756 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

 

Maybe you should challenge him to a duel. I heard thats what respectable gentleman do when one offends them. 

I don't fight respectable people, nor do I have to taken their non-respectable status into account. No thanks.

post #11757 of 19067
I think the ratio of non-Asperger's forum members to Asperger's forum members who post in this thread is probably about 1 to 6
post #11758 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think the ratio of non-Asperger's forum members to Asperger's forum members who post in this thread is probably about 1 to 6

How so, Pat?

post #11759 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Yup. Miraculously, they survived, and are thriving.

 

Just like David Copeland.

post #11760 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

How so, Pat?

 

Point Proven. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**