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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 779

post #11671 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Anyone who has scratched leather with a bone has not polished it properly or is not using it properly.

I have a deer bone (probably overpaid from Hanger Project), but how exactly do you polish it properly? High grit sandpaper?
post #11672 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post


I have a deer bone (probably overpaid from Hanger Project), but how exactly do you polish it properly? High grit sandpaper?

No, Fred, look for the smooth surface and run it on the leather. 

post #11673 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Here is a photo of a boot in process.The waist has been pegged and the heel seat area deliberately roughed up in preparation to mount the heel stack.

The waist has been scraped with broken glass and sanded. It was then burnished with the bone sitting on the bench to the right. Nothing was used to obtain the shine in the waist except water and the bone...and work. No wax...nothing. Later it will be dyed and sanded and burnished again.

(as always, click for a closer look)

And I thought you talked about the raw shaped bone... The slicker bone works just as good, but I was thinking of the Abbeyhorn raw shape deer bone...

post #11674 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

I have a deer bone (probably overpaid from Hanger Project), but how exactly do you polish it properly? High grit sandpaper?

First things first. No one needs to buy a deer bone and if it's saturated with oil, it is probably...at least in my opinion...worthless.

Just go down the the supermarket or butcher and ask for a cow leg bone. Tell 'em it's for your mastiff. Strip the meat off---I usually do this in summer by hanging the bone from a tree and letting the yellow jackets do the cleaning for me.

Then saw...do not crack...the bone in half lengthwise. Clean out the marrow and shape the fragment with a file. Round every edge and surface.

Now the polishing begins--start with 100 grit sandpaper, taking off the rough edges and scratches. Proceed to 150 grit, then 240, then 320, then 400, then 600, then 800, then 1000, then 2000, then 4000. Take your time, be through. By this time the bone itself should dern near have a mirror shine on the surface. You can further refine the surface with some white tripoli and a yarn brush on a buffer.

Look at the bone in the light, shifting it to catch various planes...if you see scratches in the surface anywhere start over with 320 grit in that area and proceed as before.

When you're done, if there are no scratches (or edges or sharp points) in the bone, it will not...cannot...scratch leather. It will feel like silk and shine like glass.
post #11675 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

And I thought you talked about the raw shaped bone... The slicker bone works just as good, but I was thinking of the Abbeyhorn raw shape deer bone...

I don't care to spend money on things that I can do myself...and better.

If I bought a deer bone I'd still have to refine it. "Properly polished" is, and was, always the caveat. And why not? Bone is a unique material, if you don't polish it you're not making the best use of it.
post #11676 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

 

 

nothing is good on solid ice in the menswear shoe arsenal. 

 

 

 

C&J Lowndes.  Featuring Yaktrax :bigstar:

 

post #11677 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I don't care to spend money on things that I can do myself...and better.

If I bought a deer bone I'd still have to refine it. "Properly polished" is, and was, always the caveat. And why not? Bone is a unique material, if you don't polish it you're not making the best use of it.

I should've talked to you first before go out buy one on my own... ANyway, $20 bucks on the slicker bone was fairly worth it.

 

Now that you've said it, I gotta admit the deer bone smells like it was saturated with tallow beforehand.

post #11678 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I should've talked to you first before go out buy one on my own... ANyway, $20 bucks on the slicker bone was fairly worth it.

Now that you've said it, I gotta admit the deer bone smells like it was saturated with tallow beforehand.

In my opinion, the tallow or oil impregnated bones are a gimmick. I could be wrong, but I'm from Missouri--you 'd have to "Show Me."
post #11679 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


In my opinion, the tallow or oil impregnated bones are a gimmick. I could be wrong, but I'm from Missouri--you 'd have to "Show Me."

I'll try and take pictures. Somehow I hate having to take pictures. 

 

ANyway, the bone is slippery and shiny, however, when rubbed on shell or sole edge, they leave a fatty surface that can be buffed up - fatty, waxy and thick, not oily and runny or so. The bone also smells of tallow.

post #11680 of 19050

Sorry to interrupt. The SF thread on this specific topic is dead, but I hope there might be some Pittsburgher SFers in this thread who have recommendations for a local place to have goodyear welted soles resoled?

post #11681 of 19050
Funny, that was the kind of bone I said I find ridiculous: deer bone, impregnated with tallow/oils, which are sold for shell cordovan care primarily...
post #11682 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDeKelver View Post
 

 

C&J Lowndes.  Featuring Yaktrax :bigstar:

 

 

 

haha!  I thought of doing that to a pair of pullup boots with leather soles after falling on my b*tt walking in minneapolis last week. Didn't actually do it. Glad to know others have also considered such odd combinations of walking gear :)  

post #11683 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Then saw...do not crack...the bone in half lengthwise. Clean out the marrow and shape the fragment with a file. Round every edge and surface.

Now the polishing begins--start with 100 grit sandpaper, taking off the rough edges and scratches. Proceed to 150 grit, then 240, then 320, then 400, then 600, then 800, then 1000, then 2000, then 4000. Take your time, be through. By this time the bone itself should dern near have a mirror shine on the surface. You can further refine the surface with some white tripoli and a yarn brush on a buffer.

Thanks! Files and a zillion types of sandpaper are definitely things I already have (from amateur woodworking) so I'll see what I can do.
post #11684 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

Funny, that was the kind of bone I said I find ridiculous: deer bone, impregnated with tallow/oils, which are sold for shell cordovan care primarily...

That bone was the one I feel most comfy with, although the dry snake head bone works a lot better in the tighter spaces, namely, "the feather edge" area.
post #11685 of 19050
Dudes I've been neglecting my Alden loafers (thrifted)

Help me being them back to life?


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