or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 766

post #11476 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScuffedBluchers View Post

fantasizing about quitting my job and learning to make and repair bad ass shoes.

No I'm not.

Yes I am.

How does anyone get into that business, though?  I see the arc for carpenters, plumbers and other craftsman... but shoes?  This is interesting.

Don't give up your day job.

Seriously....first, you have to decide whether you want to make shoes or money.

If the latter, work/train in a factory. If the former, you need to find someone who will teach you.
post #11477 of 19069


Sounds like writing. I'll stick to that.

post #11478 of 19069


Though if I can figure out a way to write about shoemaking I'll be all over it!

post #11479 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScuffedBluchers View Post


Though if I can figure out a way to write about shoemaking I'll be all over it!

Resist the impulse...for your sanity. There's a dispiriting abundance of people writing about shoemaking, most of whom have never gotten their hands dirty, wouldn't know the difference between a taw and a tingle and yet presume to tell everyone who will listen about shoes and shoemaking.

Write about what you know...therein lies authenticity.

--
Edited by DWFII - 11/5/14 at 5:44pm
post #11480 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScuffedBluchers View Post


Though if I can figure out a way to write about shoemaking I'll be all over it!

The less you know about shoemaking the better you will be able to write about shoemaking. Romanticized fictions.
post #11481 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

The less you know about shoemaking the better you will be able to write about shoemaking. Romanticized fictions.

I don't know why you say that...your posts in the pasts would indicate that you don't even believe it.

If you do, all I can say is that while some stories have been embroidered upon there's probably a kernel of truth in every single one of them. St. Hugh's Bones is a good example--the story of St Crispin comes from Soissons, France and persists into the mediaeval times to be recast/reborn as an English legend. The fact that shoemakers used bones as tools all the way up until today is documented fact. In some eras that's all they had...or wanted. And for good reason.

"64 to the inch" is another--documented by some of the most highly respected experts on the planet. .

If you don't know anything about shoemaking, you may indeed write good fiction but that's all it will be--fiction--both in intent and in the specifics. And anyone who does know anything about shoemaking will immediately recognize you as a poseur.

But no good writer omits the research.

I apologize if your post was meant to be humourous...mine is not.

But, FWIW, it is not meant to be censorious, either.
post #11482 of 19069
Technical manual writing is wholly different writing style than romanticized fictions. And the latter will unfortunately attract much wider audiences.
post #11483 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Technical manual writing is wholly different writing style than romanticized fictions. And the latter will unfortunately attract much wider audiences.

OK, I get where you're coming from.

That said, I've written three books (tutorials) on how to make boots and have been told repeatedly that my writing in them is superb ("good," "entertaining," "easy to understand," etc.). I am a good writer, I think...I work at it a little bit. But I know my subject too. I'd be straining at gnats to write about nearly anything else.

But the bottom line is that romanticized fictions are still fictions and...depending on your definitions of "good writing" or what shoemaking is all about or even whether fiction is wholly appropriate... may not, in fact, actually be either good writing or about shoemaking.

It puts me in mind of Trout Fishing in America--not really about trout fishing at all.

Or a book by Bernard Cornwall (can't recall the title) about the Battle of Hastings (c.1066) where one of the protagonists kicks down an oaken door with the heel of his boot. Romanticized fiction, indeed... but ruined for me because I know that doors in that time were often as much as three inches thick and mounted on heavy iron hinges; and boots had no heels until roughly the 16th century.
post #11484 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

From The Honourable Cordwainers' Company website

Thanks for the valuable info, DW.

post #11485 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post
boots had no heels until roughly the 16th century.

 

Sometimes it's the smallest and least empirically-useful motes of knowledge, that delight me most.  Thank you.

 

I have a similar problem with fiction all the time, whether books or movies: some tiny detail that's obviously not right, breaks the spell of disbelief momentarily, and spoils the whole thing for a while. An anachronistic turn of phrase.  Someone carrying luggage that appears to be empty, or drinking from an empty cup..etc.  Sometimes pedantry has its price!

post #11486 of 19069

From what DW brought to me today, gentlemen, may I conclude the following statement:

 

"I care not what others think, but should I wear a comfortable, beautiful, and lasting pair of shoes, I owe the maker not just the payment, but I also owe him a masterpiece, a sacrifice, and an effort. Should I look down, and feel happy, or delightful, about my feet, I know that I owe the shoemaker(s) so many debts, no payments could ever so be enough."

 

The exaggerated statement above can also be applied to all hard workers of shoe factories such as that of AE, even though, for damn sure, AE quality had decline so severely. 

 

This is all genuine, not copied from anybody.

post #11487 of 19069
It's much more entertaining to read tumblr posts that market articles of clothing as "bespoke". While mundane details about shoemaking as a craft fulfills some intellectual curious minds, they make poor entertainments.

And you are very right. Making shoes and making money are two separate businesses. Thus a few renowned shoemakers sold their workshop or their RTW brands.
post #11488 of 19069
And I am still confused why a Toppy goes on the bottom of shoe.....
post #11489 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

It's much more entertaining to read tumblr posts that market articles of clothing as "bespoke". While mundane details about shoemaking as a craft fulfills some intellectual curious minds, they make poor entertainments.

And you are very right. Making shoes and making money are two separate businesses. Thus a few renowned shoemakers sold their workshop or their RTW brands.

I'm sure that's true...for some. But, no disrespect intended, I don't think that the world owes me an entertainment. I don't spend my life searching for "...the next whisky bar Oh don't ask why..."

So I filter everything I read or hear against fact, reality, logic, commonsense and experience, etc....in that order. (I'm sure that's what most people do...but I can only speak to what I know and am.)

Bottom line, for me at least...even entertainment has to resonate.

Oh! And I'm not selling.

"To everything there is a season..."

--
Edited by DWFII - 11/6/14 at 6:14am
post #11490 of 19069


Doughnuts

 

And it's killing me

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**