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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 765

post #11461 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post



Not sure where you are getting your info traverscao, but that seems like an odd statement to make without providing anything factual to support it, unless of course you are a bespoke shoemaker as DWFII is. If pics help, the Vass book explains it the same way DWFII does:
"The edges of the sole and heel are treated with the desired color. Then a thin layer of wax is applied."



 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Try to keep up, traverscao. Read through just a few of the pages here and you will find that DWF is one of a small group of people who have real experience and knowledge of shoes. DWF, as a bespoke shoemaker, is someone from whom we can all learn. He is generous with his knowledge and very much worth listening to. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post




But you have...crackup[1].gif

The bespoke maker I referred to above is none other than your's truly...backed by all my contemporaries I've ever spoken with and the literature going back at least 200 years.

I'll try to keep up. I've always thought the black stuff was waxes and tar, and was melted before applied. Something I should've known...

 

And gents, even when I deny myself as Dave C., you may as well be eligible to call me a douche bag... 

post #11462 of 19061
Post less, read and think more smile.gif
post #11463 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

I did something bad didn't I? :(

post #11464 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Please, DW, call me a douche bag...

Dinna fash yerself, laddie. Everybody is born ignorant. Learning is the great adventure.
post #11465 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Dinna fash yerself, laddie. Everybody is born ignorant. Learning is the great adventure.

True...

post #11466 of 19061


What book is that?

post #11467 of 19061

DW, regarding heel and sole edges, though, were they rubbed with sand papers prior inking and waxing? I tried to smooth some AE's sole edges on my own with a deer bone and seems to work, but too much reading leads to too much confusions at the same time.

post #11468 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScuffedBluchers View Post


What book is that?

Handmade Shoes For Men. Lazlo Vass
post #11469 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

DW, regarding heel and sole edges, though, were they rubbed with sand papers prior inking and waxing? I tried to smooth some AE's sole edges on my own with a deer bone and seems to work, but too much reading leads to too much confusions at the same time.

They must be rasped and sanded to shape and good even maximum fineness.

After that, the best way I've found is to wet them, rub them with a bone or a burnishing tool until they are surface dry and shiny. Then, right before dying them. Lightly sand them with pretty fine paper (I go as high as 800 grit Abralon) to break the shine. Dye.

Lightly burnish again with the bone and then apply wax. Buff.
post #11470 of 19061

I had the edges done partially right then, I guess. 

post #11471 of 19061

Question to all of you who are currently owning a deer bone - do you get an oily residue left behind or some kind of heavy, waxy, fatty, thick surface? I get the latter, not the former, and I am wondering if the bone is alright.

post #11472 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Question to all of you who are currently owning a deer bone - do you get an oily residue left behind or some kind of heavy, waxy, fatty, thick surface? I get the latter, not the former, and I am wondering if the bone is alright.

I use a piece of polished cow bone shaped to my needs. I kind of think the "deer" bone business is a gimmick...but who knows? Most of the time I use a very hard, fine grained, polished wooded "rub stick." So no residues from either of them.

Shoemakers have used bones time-out-of-mind for burnishing and polishing. Originally, they were human bones taken from a third century shoemaker hero who later became a Saint--Saint Crispin (or in the English version--St. Hugh).
post #11473 of 19061

fantasizing about quitting my job and learning to make and repair bad ass shoes.

 

No I'm not.

 

Yes I am.

 

How does anyone get into that business, though?  I see the arc for carpenters, plumbers and other craftsman... but shoes?  This is interesting.

post #11474 of 19061

I've heard of "chair legs" from Carre Ducker, I've seen St. Crispin shoemakers using hammer's shaft, among other shoemakers, but human bone was certainly the first for me to hear (or to even think) of.

 

A YouTube video of phototristan showed his process of smoothing shell cordovan with deer bone gave me an impression that deer bones leaves oily residue. However, my bone leaves a fatty, thick residue, and I'm fairly surprised.

post #11475 of 19061
From The Honourable Cordwainers' Company website
Quote:
Although the story is probably a 15th- or 16th-century retelling of the Crispin legend, we know a little more about St. Hugh, who, although never canonized, was the English counterpart to St. Crispin. Hugh was born a prince of Britain, son of Arviragus–king of Powisland, or modern Wales. He fell in love with a beautiful Christian princess, Winifred of Flintshire. Winifred's story has many of the elements of the 7th-century Saint Winifred of Holywell and Shrewsbury fame. Her appearance in the legend of St. Hugh is similar in that having taken a vow of chastity, she spurns Hugh's overtures. In despair, Hugh journeys across Europe. At last tired and convinced that he has mistaken Winifred's intentions, he took passage back to England. Mid-journey his ship was caught in a storm and Hugh was the only survivor. When he made it back to his home, he was destitute. Thrown back his own resources, Hugh became a shoemaker, preaching the gospel by day and plying his craft by night. Hugh renewed his suit of Winifred, who, like her namesake, was now living by a spring, but to his dismay, the results are the same. When Winifred was arrested and condemned to death for her devotion to God, Hugh set off to Flintshire. There he spoke so highly of her and praised her so lavishly, that he was imprisoned and condemned to share her fate. According to the story, Hugh and Winifred were put to death about 300 A.D.. Winifred was bled to death in emulation of the wounds Christ received. Hugh was made to drink a poisoned cup of her blood, and was hanged. Legend has it that his fellow shoemakers kept vigil and consoled him during the time of his imprisonment. As he drank from the poisoned cup, he bequeathed all his worldly goods to his friends. Since he was destitute, all he had to leave them was his bones After his death, his friends pulled his body from the gibbet and distributed his bones. These were made into shoemaking tools. For many years a shoemaker's tool kit was called St. Hugh's Bones.
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