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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 750

post #11236 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Testing could take a up to a lifetime. Yet, to be honest with you, Pat, I would say that they worth every single seconds and minutes. 

The problem is that most individuals don't have enough resources--shoes, feet and environmental conditions--to test anything properly or objectively.

A number of people pop up in this thread recommending conditioners or "dubbins" that leave a greasy residue. And arguably, for most of the people making those kinds of recommendations, a spit shine on the toes...for instance...isn't a high priority. So their recommendations may indeed be perfect for their desired outcomes. But not everybody shares those druthers.

Similarly, for rubber outsoles and the issue of "breathing." Some people may get away with rubber outsoles fine; some won't, but can't (or but won't) recognize the problem; and others even suffer disease. Any objective analysis or "testing" has to encompass all those different factors. It can't be so singularized that even if others can be found who have had similar experiences, those that haven't, are ignored or dismissed.

In the end, it doesn't matter what any one of us has experienced...that perspective is fundamentally ego-centric...it only matters what the objective facts about the materials or techniques or situations are. It doesn't matter if 100 people put Topy on the bottom of their shoes and are happy with it and never get cracked insoles or tinea pedis. It only matters that the materials are inherently occlusive and objectively, inherently problematic.

The Golden Boys out there can, and should, rejoice, but the rest of us have a reality to confront...preferably before the sun goes down.

--
Edited by DWFII - 10/20/14 at 5:00pm
post #11237 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


The problem is that most individuals don't have enough resources--shoes, feet and environmental conditions--to test anything properly or objectively.

A number of people pop up in this thread recommending conditioners or "dubbins" that leave a greasy residue. And arguably, for most of the people making those kinds of recommendations, a spit shine on the toes...for instance...isn't a high priority. So their recommendations may indeed be perfect for their desired outcomes. But not everybody shares those druthers.

Similarly, for rubber outsoles and the issue of "breathing." Some people may get away with rubber outsoles fine; some won't, but can't (or but won't) recognize the problem; and others even suffer disease. Any objective analysis or "testing" has to encompass all those different factors. It can't be so singularized that even if others can be found who have had similar experiences, those that haven't, are ignored or dismissed.

In the end, it doesn't matter what any one of us has experienced...that perspective is fundamentally ego-centric...it only matters what the objective facts about the materials or techniques or situations are. It doesn't matter if 100 people put Topy on the bottom of their shoes and are happy with it and never get cracked insoles or tinea pedis. It only matters that the materials are inherently occlusive and objectively, inherently problematic.

The Golden Boys out there can, and should, rejoice, but the rest of us have a reality to confront...preferably before the sun goes down.

--

Point taken. 

post #11238 of 19057
I have a pair of C&J Wicklow boots that are starting to look a little worse for wear. I have the Barneys version but according to C&Js site these are "made from robust oiled-hide leather." Honestly, I've never done anything other than brushing and trees with these. The leather has a bit of texture to it, so it reflects light slightly differently depending on which way you brush it. I'll email C&J and see what they say, but any thoughts on what to use to condition/clean these up a bit?
post #11239 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

I have a pair of C&J Wicklow boots that are starting to look a little worse for wear. I have the Barneys version but according to C&Js site these are "made from robust oiled-hide leather." Honestly, I've never done anything other than brushing and trees with these. The leather has a bit of texture to it, so it reflects light slightly differently depending on which way you brush it. I'll email C&J and see what they say, but any thoughts on what to use to condition/clean these up a bit?

Pictures, please, if you could upload for us a few?

post #11240 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Pat, Saphir MDO was developed during the 1920s, and still, we are still testing them, to see if they fit the title "Gold Medal" they labelled themselves.

i am not 100% sure (99% hahahah) but in 1920 they were awarded with the "gold medal" !! the consistancy of the products is changed a lot times from back then!!

post #11241 of 19057
Being awarded a gold medal by who? Who are these people awarding gold medals! :SeinfeldVoice:

who-are-these-people.jpg
post #11242 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Being awarded a gold medal by who? Who are these people awarding gold medals!

FWIW...I don't know the details behind the MDO designation, but in the 19th century (and perhaps into the early 20th) International Expositions were held to display and highlight the Trades and their practitioners as well as emerging technology.

The original John Lobb won a Gold Medal at one of these. Gold Medal Flour won a gold medal at an Expo.

Sometimes these expositions and the recognition given to a product or a craftsman were the defining moment in the history of the firm, and they often appended "Gold Medal" to their product names.

According to Dobbs, "The Last Shall Be First," John Lobb was pretty much unknown...maybe even itinerant, IIRC... until he won.

--
Edited by DWFII - 10/21/14 at 6:44am
post #11243 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Pictures, please, if you could upload for us a few?
Sorry, this is the only one I have at the moment. A month ago I took pics of my whole shoe rotation since I had bought and sold so many in the past year or so. (Pics here, if anyone cares.) The Wicklow is the boot in the middle below. It's obviously a boot that's not intended to be babied, but I would like to clean it up and condition it a bit. I'm just not sure exactly what to use with "robust oiled-hide leather," as C&J puts it.

post #11244 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

i am not 100% sure (99% hahahah) but in 1920 they were awarded with the "gold medal" !! the consistancy of the products is changed a lot times from back then!!

Hahaha!! Thanks Ben!
post #11245 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

FWIW...I don't know the details behind the MSO designation, but in the 19th century (and perhaps into the early 20th) International Expositions were held to display and highlight the Trades and their practitioners as well as emerging technology.

The original John Lobb won a Gold Medal at one of these. Gold Medal Flour won a gold medal at an Expo.

Sometime these expositions and the recognition given to a product or a craftsman were the defining moment in the history of the firm, and they often appended "Gold Medal" to their product names.

According to Dobbs, "The Last Shall Be First," John Lobb was pretty much unknown...maybe even itinerant, IIRC... until he won.

--

I bet Avel of France probably joined one of these bespoke shoe competition, or at the very least provided the shoemaker(s) the polish, which, from time to time, gain more and more attention.
post #11246 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

Sorry, this is the only one I have at the moment. A month ago I took pics of my whole shoe rotation since I had bought and sold so many in the past year or so. (Pics here, if anyone cares.) The Wicklow is the boot in the middle below. It's obviously a boot that's not intended to be babied, but I would like to clean it up and condition it a bit. I'm just not sure exactly what to use with "robust oiled-hide leather," as C&J puts it.


I would suggest, from my opinion, that you clean these with watm water and a brush, scrub the mud and dirt off, then let the leather dry off of water before either 1) treat them with Réno or Venetian shoe cream, or better than both of these - Glen Karen conditioner, or 2) use a very light grease, such as Saphir dubbin, or Huberd's shoe grease. In any case, remember to brush the leather a lot before treatments, and henceforth after.

Again, that's my suggestion. You might as well hold up for a response from C&J.

Guys, anybody else willing to give this man a hand?
post #11247 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

1) treat them with Réno or Venetian shoe cream, or better than both of these - Glen Karen conditioner, or 2) use a very light grease, such as Saphir dubbin, or Huberd's shoe grease. In any case, remember to brush the leather a lot before treatments, and henceforth after.

Again, that's my suggestion. You might as well hold up for a response from C&J.

I dunno. GK is of course great for calf, but I seriously doubt the high beeswax content would be appropriate for these. The leather isn't exactly smooth, but almost has a subtle nap to it which is why I haven't tried Renovateur on them yet. I could try Bick4 I suppose, but I'll see if C&J responds to my query.
post #11248 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

I dunno. GK is of course great for calf, but I seriously doubt the high beeswax content would be appropriate for these. The leather isn't exactly smooth, but almost has a subtle nap to it which is why I haven't tried Renovateur on them yet. I could try Bick4 I suppose, but I'll see if C&J responds to my query.

That's probably your best bet...wait for advice from C&J.

Hard to know what you're leather is really like from photos but if it's an oiled nu-buc, maybe a light, penetrating oil. Maybe coconut oil.

A light wax wouldn't go amiss either, although it might lay the nap down a bit. but, on the other hand, if it's a nu-buc it doesn't have much of a nap really, so that might not be a consideration..

PS...if I were you, I'd give up any hope of returning them to the original pristine colour--that's the downside of light coloured leathers esp. those that do not have a finish coat. They're a "casual" boot and dark streaks and dirt spots are supposed to signify "character."
post #11249 of 19057
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

That's probably your best bet...wait for advice from C&J.

...

PS...if I were you, I'd give up any hope of returning them to the original pristine colour--that's the downside of light coloured leathers esp. those that do not have a finish coat. They're a "casual" boot and dark streaks and dirt spots are supposed to signify "character."

Thanks! I'll wait and see what they say. I certainly don't care about returning to the original color as these are pretty hard wearing boots. I'm more concerned with conditioning than cleaning.
post #11250 of 19057

Wore my Tricker's out to a bachelor party weekend and unfortunately something spilled on them (no idea what). :facepalm: I used renovateur and have brushed them a fair amount. Any ideas on what I can do to get rid of the rest of the spots? 

 

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