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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 745

post #11161 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by SushiOfTheGods View Post
 

Thanks DWF for the answer. I guess I'll consider it but not top priority at all it seems.

 

I don't know if this belongs here but I just received a pair of Carmina double monks and it looks beautiful. However, the sole of one side has this gap shown below. I don't know what to make of it but I can see the inside. Should I return them? I'm afraid water might get inside and mess things up.

 

 

 

 

In the long run, if this is  left unfixed, then water and pebbles can find their way into the stitching channel, which will grind the stitching and the leather out. Furthermore, it's a defect. Return it.

post #11162 of 19068

Thanks for the replies. I just really, really prefer not to return it because shipping and receiving internationally in Canada is a pain. But if it is going to affect the quality of my shoes in the long run, I think I may have to... But then again AE has their stitching out in the open and more research tells me it doesn't really matter and I can just glue it back down with some glue from the cobbler.


Edited by SushiOfTheGods - 10/16/14 at 3:41pm
post #11163 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by SushiOfTheGods View Post

Thanks for the replies. I just really, really prefer not to return it because shipping and receiving internationally in Canada is a pain. But if it is going to affect the quality of my shoes in the long run, I think I may have to... But then again AE has their stitching out in the open and more research tells me it doesn't really matter and I can just glue it back down with some glue from the cobbler.

Barge All Purpose cement--at your cobbler. You can usually buy it in small tubes. Apply to both sides, let dry, 10 minutes or so, press edges together and hammer. Done.
post #11164 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by SushiOfTheGods View Post
 

Thanks for the replies. I just really, really prefer not to return it because shipping and receiving internationally in Canada is a pain. But if it is going to affect the quality of my shoes in the long run, I think I may have to... But then again AE has their stitching out in the open and more research tells me it doesn't really matter and I can just glue it back down with some glue from the cobbler.

Precisely one of the things I hate about AE. I know vacuum the carpet every week is necessary, however the pebbles and rocks falling out of the stitch groove is really getting on my nerves.

 

The next time I need a repair, my shoes are going to Nick at B Nelson, and I'll ask him for a closed channel, since I won't be having my shoes to AE anymore.

post #11165 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Barge All Purpose cement--at your cobbler. You can usually buy it in small tubes. Apply to both sides, let dry, 10 minutes or so, press edges together and hammer. Done.

 

Just checked your comment AFTER coming back from the cobbler and getting some Barge All Purpose Cement. Glad it's the same exact thing you recommended!

 

So now I'm just wondering, because my shoes are so dark, I really, really do not want to darken it any further. Any suggestions on how to commence my first shine on these babies? I usually Renovateur -> cream -> wax a few layers, then spit shine. I do not have any Lexol and Bick4, nor GlenKare stuff. Only Saphir unfortunately. I should probably only apply a very thin layer of everything in case.

post #11166 of 19068

Not the best craftsmanship but looks good to me!

 

post #11167 of 19068

How can you pay so much money for a pair of shoes, only to have to glue them together?

post #11168 of 19068

All channeled soles are going to separate along the channel eventually, however much they cost.  Sure, it's a QC letdown that they weren't holding properly in the first place in this instance, but that's the complaint I think, not any serious structural issue.

post #11169 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

How can you pay so much money for a pair of shoes, only to have to glue them together?

Cost and time of glueing them together yourself < Cost and time of sending an email, waiting for a response, sending them back, waiting for shipping refund and waiting for a new pair.
post #11170 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

All channeled soles are going to separate along the channel eventually, however much they cost.  Sure, it's a QC letdown that they weren't holding properly in the first place in this instance, but that's the complaint I think, not any serious structural issue.

Yes and no.

First, any kind of channeling is usually better than none (stitching aloft) or an open groove.

Second, a good many manufactured shoes will have a vertical channel. Nothing wrong with that except appearance (it's visible right from the get-go, even if only as a thin line) and such channels never open up even though no adhesive is used.

Many high end manufactured shoes, on the other hand, have a horizontal channel that is really only a thin flap of leather. They will always open up regardless of the cement (or paste) used, and generally sooner, rather than later. Simply because the leather is thin and wear and abrasion will expose the stitching and defeat the best of adhesives. But they look good, esp. at first...and emulate truly high end work.

A good bespoke channel is cut at an angle from the edge of the outsole. It gets deeper as it gets closer to the actual line of stitching. This kind of channel will open up slightly, esp. at first if the adhesive used to secure the edge is not up to the task. But as the outsole wears, it's much harder for the channel to open up no matter what cement or paste...or none...is used. In that regard, an angled channel is more nearly like a vertical channel. Of course this angled channel must be cut by hand and kept out of the way by hand while the outsole is stitched...by hand. But it looks terrific and wears well.

On edit...parenthetically, any oil or conditioner that you put on your outsoles is going to vitiate the adhesive that holds the channel closed. FFT (food for thought)

--
Edited by DWFII - 10/17/14 at 6:46am
post #11171 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

Cost and time of glueing them together yourself < Cost and time of sending an email, waiting for a response, sending them back, waiting for shipping refund and waiting for a new pair.

^+1

Which will, almost certainly, also open up, to one degree or another.
post #11172 of 19068

Those in the picture have a horizontal flap, right?  I think Meermin do it the same way.

 

I'm impressed by the way my Vass soles have stayed intact - like you said, just a very thin line.  I thin the channel is vertical rather than angled, but seems to have a lot of structural integrity.

post #11173 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

Those in the picture have a horizontal flap, right?  I think Meermin do it the same way.

I'm impressed by the way my Vass soles have stayed intact - like you said, just a very thin line.  I thin the channel is vertical rather than angled, but seems to have a lot of structural integrity.

Almost certainly.
post #11174 of 19068

If it is less expensive to glue together a expensive pair of shoes (and the makers must know this), why don't top companies simply send out a few a few lemons, knowing that they will not be sent back? If it wasn't done too often, it would be a nice little earner for the company. Perhaps they already do this...

post #11175 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

If it is less expensive to glue together a expensive pair of shoes (and the makers must know this), why don't top companies simply send out a few a few lemons, knowing that they will not be sent back? If it wasn't done too often, it would be a nice little earner for the company. Perhaps they already do this...

crackup[1].gif I'm as skeptical as anyone with regard to manufacturers and advertising hype, but not that skeptical.

For one thing they'd lose customers and believe it or not word of mouth is pretty effective.

For another thing, the fact that the channel "flap" often comes loose, is simply an artifact of the methods they've chosen to emulate (read pretend) to the same level of quality as bespoke. They're committed, they're not going to change or go to extra effort esp. since there is, in fact, little if any structural downside to cutting a horizontal channel. Sushi could have worn that shoe until the sole had a hole in it and except for the slightly "tawdry" (ragged) appearance, no harm no foul.
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