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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 743

post #11131 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisRocknRoll View Post

 


.... I remember the days of baseball gloves cracking from this sort of treatment from drying out internally and not being able to get anything to penetrate through the sno seal.

 

 

 

Wow, I have heard some crazy tales of how people treat gloves, either for breaking in purposes or general maintenance, but I don't think I've ever heard of someone using Sno Seal. Wow. :)

 

My own experience is that the most common cause of internal cracking in a glove is from perspiration and not wearing a batting glove on the glove hand.  Seems to work for me. 

 

Nokona used to have something on its website that said the six most important words to remember for breaking in a glove are "play catch ... play catch ... play catch."  That has worked for me.  Once you get it broken in some, the palm layers compress and the oil goo/glue will seep through a little and make that black spot about the size of a ball.  I never add any oil or anything except a bit of conditioner on rare occasions.

 

Linking this back to shoe care, based on this thread I got a bottle of Bick 4 for - among other things - an old pair of Hanover PTB's in #8 shell.  Once I got my rag wet, I started looking around for other things to condition.  After giving my old Gladstone a good going over, I turned my attention to an old (cir. 1950's) Nokona J113 I found on ebay.  It's really in pretty good shape but I've been reluctant to put anything on it in the way of conditioner.  But, I rubbed in some Bick 4, let it soak it, and buffed it dry.  Looks good with no darkening of the leather.

post #11132 of 19082
I'm selling a pair of shoes where I had a rubber topy placed over the sole. I had someone ask me if they were to remove the topy, would there be any permanant glue residue or something of the like. Gonna ask the cobbler I used, but I was just wondering if anyone here would know as well
post #11133 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 

 

AFAIK, they are exactly the same product. 

 

Venetian Shoe Cream smells stronger than Saphir Renovateur in general due to the turpentine in the Venetian. Reno I believe has some perfume in it to make it smell good too. 

 

I thought that VSC had no turpentine in it?  

 

I saw a post here (somewhere) from the North American importer of VSC, saying that nobody exactly knows what's in VSC.  But why do others on the forum recommend VSC over Reno (including a reference to Nick Horween giving a jar of VSC to a forum member)?

post #11134 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickatpsu View Post
 

 

I thought that VSC had no turpentine in it?  

 

I saw a post here (somewhere) from the North American importer of VSC, saying that nobody exactly knows what's in VSC.  But why do others on the forum recommend VSC over Reno (including a reference to Nick Horween giving a jar of VSC to a forum member)?

 

well, if you leave a bottle of vsc sitting on the shelf for a year or so, a water-like liquid separates from the cream and sits on top. Based on teh smell I'd guess its turpentine, but who knows. Either way, if you put vsc on your shoes about once a year, they'll be alright even if it contains turpentine

 

oh, and vsc is much cheaper than reno, and perhaps not much worse (although others might disagree). I just use some combination of lexol/bick4 and paste wax  for shoe care (even though I now have just about every magical shoe-potion advocated on these fora)

post #11135 of 19082

I hope I'm not opening a Pandora's box here again but what is SF's thoughts about "Sole Protectors?" I know Burgol is pretty well regarded and I just came across this:

http://www.shoepassion.com/shoe-care-products/leather-sole-protector.html

post #11136 of 19082

Just to clear it up for you folks, VSC is a glaze cream, not an actual care product. It shines, and it nourish, but little. It does not contain much oil compare to the amount of oils seen in Reno. VSC, again, is more like a typical kind of polish that will encourage a glow and patina, not a shine, and again not the perfect stuff for nourishment. 

 

The reason why Horween used the product was largely because of the ability of the cream to produce a glaze over the smooth surface of shell cordovan. It's low oil content makes excellent glazed surface. If you wish to restore a shell to its former shine, then yes, VSC is the product. As of nourishment, no.

post #11137 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by SushiOfTheGods View Post
 

I hope I'm not opening a Pandora's box here again but what is SF's thoughts about "Sole Protectors?" I know Burgol is pretty well regarded and I just came across this:

http://www.shoepassion.com/shoe-care-products/leather-sole-protector.html

Only use when the sole is fully cleaned. Dampen the leather and apply the stuff on. Should work out fairly well. Use them sparingly.

 

Alternatively, I use pure neatsfoot oil.

post #11138 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Just to clear it up for you folks, VSC is a glaze cream, not an actual care product. It shines, and it nourish, but little. It does not contain much oil compare to the amount of oils seen in Reno. VSC, again, is more like a typical kind of polish that will encourage a glow and patina, not a shine, and again not the perfect stuff for nourishment. 

 

The reason why Horween used the product was largely because of the ability of the cream to produce a glaze over the smooth surface of shell cordovan. It's low oil content makes excellent glazed surface. If you wish to restore a shell to its former shine, then yes, VSC is the product. As of nourishment, no.

Thanks.   

 

So what is the common opinion of the best nourishment product for shell?

post #11139 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickatpsu View Post
 

Thanks.   

 

So what is the common opinion of the best nourishment product for shell?

There isn't one particular product. There are plenty to try. Some used Lexol, others Bick 4, many preferred Saphir Reno and Saphir Cordovan. Crazy as I am, I used boot grease on my shells. 

 

Further than this point then, re-read the whole thread and see what works for you.

post #11140 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

There isn't one particular product. There are plenty to try. Some used Lexol, others Bick 4, many preferred Saphir Reno and Saphir Cordovan. Crazy as I am, I used boot grease on my shells. 

 

Further than this point then, re-read the whole thread and see what works for you.

 

Thanks.  Here's the guidance I've been following, originally posted on the AE Appreciation Thread:

 

Originally Posted by patrick_b View Post

As has been mentioned, the use of Renomat is something done very infrequently, maybe once or twice a year and only to remove built up layers of wax. If you rarely apply wax, there is no reason to strip a shoe with Remomat. However, after using a product like Renomat, it is essential to recondition with a product like Renovateur (or the conditioner of your choice) followed by protective and shiny layer(s) of wax. Renomat is a fantastic product but one with a very specific purpose and should not be confused with day to day shoe care products like VSC or Renovateur.

You could liken this type of regimen to a full car detail. Old wax is stripped completely down to the paint, followed by thorough cleaning and application of new layers of wax. It's something done infrequently, perhaps annually.

Your weekly car washes are like the day to day shoe care. Mac method, occasional conditioning, cleaning and touch ups with Renovateur or VSC.

post #11141 of 19082
Don't take it too literally. Shell won't work very well with Renomat. At the very least, big shoe brushes would be your best friend when playing with shell.
post #11142 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Don't take it too literally. Shell won't work very well with Renomat. At the very least, big shoe brushes would be your best friend when playing with shell.

Renomat is great on shell for its designed purpose only. To strip layers of gunk off the shell..it is a great tool for undoing gobs of caked on product applied by a previous shoe owner or a manufacturer.

Other than that as @traversco said it does not need to be a part of your regular treatment.
post #11143 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by PattyC View Post

I'm selling a pair of shoes where I had a rubber topy placed over the sole. I had someone ask me if they were to remove the topy, would there be any permanant glue residue or something of the like. Gonna ask the cobbler I used, but I was just wondering if anyone here would know as well

In order to mount Topy the grain surface of the outsole must be broken (roughed up) so that the cement can soak in and best adhesion be achieved. Taking the Topy off will not change that. The outsole will be rough and the cement hard to get off short of grinding it off.

--
Edited by DWFII - 10/16/14 at 5:40am
post #11144 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by SushiOfTheGods View Post

I hope I'm not opening a Pandora's box here again but what is SF's thoughts about "Sole Protectors?" I know Burgol is pretty well regarded and I just came across this:
http://www.shoepassion.com/shoe-care-products/leather-sole-protector.html

If you read the detailed description, it says to apply it every six months. I don't think it would harm anything to do so but again, the description warns about oil spots...on clothes, on your shoes etc..

Pure, natural neatsfoot (some of it is synthetic) might work just about as well and be considerably less expensive....if used conservatively and infrequently. It bears repeating that errant drops of oil can stain upper leather and clothing. If neatsfoot is wanted, Lexol-nf is highly emulsified and goes into the leather rapidly and leaves no (or less) greasy residue on the surface.

You could even use it, sparingly, on the insoles...if the insoles in your shoes are real vegetable tanned leather insoles (not leatherboard, fiberboard, or sockliners). Again, "sparingly" (and infrequently) is the watchword and wipe the inside of the shoe out after it has rested for 24 hours or so.
post #11145 of 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


If you read the detailed description, it says to apply it every six months. I don't think it would harm anything to do so but again, the description warns about oil spots...on clothes, on your shoes etc..

Pure, natural neatsfoot (some of it is synthetic) might work just about as well and be considerably less expensive....if used conservatively and infrequently. It bears repeating that errant drops of oil can stain upper leather and clothing. If neatsfoot is wanted, Lexol-nf is highly emulsified and goes into the leather rapidly and leaves no (or less) greasy residue on the surface.

You could even use it, sparingly, on the insoles...if the insoles in your shoes are real vegetable tanned leather insoles (not leatherboard, fiberboard, or sockliners). Again, "sparingly" (and infrequently) is the watchword and wipe the inside of the shoe out after it has rested for 24 hours or so.

I used pure neatsfoot oil. Seems to absorb very well into bark tanned soles.

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