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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 735

post #11011 of 19043

Precisely... However, there are shoes that brings in memories to be cherished, and to a point which an individual would not want to trash... That's when shoe polish companies make money, and that would, by chance, help us retain part of our memories, wardrobe, and collection.

post #11012 of 19043

Just a quick question - anybody here owns Russian Reindeer/Calf/"Leather"? If so, can the venerable owner offer every of us here how they take care of the hide?

post #11013 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Just a quick question - anybody here owns Russian Reindeer/Calf/"Leather"? If so, can the venerable owner offer every of us here how they take care of the hide?

 

many different kinds of leathers are called russian calf, including a hatch grain made by horween in the past. i dont own any of them, but it might be good to specify what leather you are asking about (maker of the shoes/bags would be one indicator of what leather you're referring to)

post #11014 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post
 

 

many different kinds of leathers are called russian calf, including a hatch grain made by horween in the past. i dont own any of them, but it might be good to specify what leather you are asking about (maker of the shoes/bags would be one indicator of what leather you're referring to)

How 'bout the stuff from George Cleverley? I don't have much a doubt about stuff from Cleverley. 

 

And to clear my points, I mean the stuff that smells pretty, with hatch grain, russet in color, and generally, the real Russian Reindeer/Calf/"Leather". I doubt if imitated Russian leather helps, because it'll basically be corrected grain hide. 

 

Beside, I haven't heard much about Horween's Russian Leather. Any experience?

post #11015 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Just a quick question - anybody here owns Russian Reindeer/Calf/"Leather"? If so, can the venerable owner offer every of us here how they take care of the hide?

Cleverley told me to use this stuff; http://www.styleforum.net/t/187914/lightbox/post/6194811/id/721866

It takes too much work, so I now use Glenkaren on it. Works much better- penetrates more and the leather is much better hydrated and supple. The unique smell is gone, and the leather is a bit shinier but I think that's a small price to pay.
post #11016 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post


Cleverley told me to use this stuff; http://www.styleforum.net/t/187914/lightbox/post/6194811/id/721866

It takes too much work, so I now use Glenkaren on it. Works much better- penetrates more and the leather is much better hydrated and supple. The unique smell is gone, and the leather is a bit shinier but I think that's a small price to pay.

That thing is a dressing grease, which, I would certainly have a different form of application with it. 

 

Thanks for sharing the care tip. Kinda sad to see the smell gone with the pampering. 

 

However, if you want the smell to come back, then extreme measures can always be taken. You can try strip the old polish off, wash the shoes clean, let it dry thoroughly, then apply the dressing lightly to the surface across.

 

I've been looking for that dressing for years. Dunno if I can ever find it on commercial market again. Last time seen the stuff it went the speed of sky rocket.

post #11017 of 19043
Hello gents. May I ask for some advice?

My AE Long Branch boots are my most-worn knock-around beater boots. But I didn't realize how hard I was wearing through the lining in the heel until yesterday when I was giving them some TLC.

On the left heel, the lining has torn straight through, and the heel shank is almost poking through.

Is this sonething most cobblers can fix, or should I have it repaired by a specialist or sent to the factory? And what would be the preferred repair method to request?

Thank you for your time!!!

post #11018 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

Hello gents. May I ask for some advice?

My AE Long Branch boots are my most-worn knock-around beater boots. But I didn't realize how hard I was wearing through the lining in the heel until yesterday when I was giving them some TLC.

On the left heel, the lining has torn straight through, and the heel shank is almost poking through.

Is this sonething most cobblers can fix, or should I have it repaired by a specialist or sent to the factory? And what would be the preferred repair method to request?

Thank you for your time!!!

I'd send them back to AE for refurb...less than 200 bucks and they're good as new!

post #11019 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

On the left heel, the lining has torn straight through, and the heel shank is almost poking through.

Is this sonething most cobblers can fix, or should I have it repaired by a specialist or sent to the factory? And what would be the preferred repair method to request?

The heel stiffener (not "shank") is celastic. It will abrade and fall forward as the lining continues to deteriorate.

A cobbler can install a large patch that will cover the whole area but it must be sewn through the lining and the upper simultaneously--so you'll have an additional line of stitching on that one boot. If appearance counts, you should consider this because to stitch inside a completed boot requires a specialized machine and it is intrinsically imprecise. So even if you have a heel liner installed in both boots the exterior stitching is seldom going to match, much less be as clean and "straight" as all the rest of the stitching.

Whether the factory would repair it is unknown. I doubt it. To replace the lining would require nearly as much work as making the boot in the first place. The only thing that would be saved is the upper leather. And most factories don't employ people to do such specialized work, nor do they have the desire or protocols to interrupt their production for such an odd job.

The cobbler is your best bet...
post #11020 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

The heel stiffener (not "shank") is celastic. It will abrade and fall forward as the lining continues to deteriorate.

A cobbler can install a large patch that will cover the whole area but it must be sewn through the lining and the upper simultaneously--so you'll have an additional line of stitching on that one boot. If appearance counts, you should consider this because to stitch inside a completed boot requires a specialized machine and it is intrinsically imprecise. So even if you have a heel liner installed in both boots the exterior stitching is seldom going to match, much less be as clean and "straight" as all the rest of the stitching.

Whether the factory would repair it is unknown. I doubt it. To replace the lining would require nearly as much work as making the boot in the first place. The only thing that would be saved is the upper leather. And most factories don't employ people to do such specialized work, nor do they have the desire or protocols to interrupt their production for such an odd job.

The cobbler is your best bet...
Thank you for this. For these boots, function and integrity matter to me more than looks, so I will seek out a cobbler well skilled in this sort of work.

Does anyone have recommendations in Brooklyn? Hundreds of neighborhood "shoe/key/lock" storefronts abound, but I would prefer to know that someone can get this particular job done.
post #11021 of 19043
The original Russia calf was reindeer tanned with willow bark and curried with birch bark oil. What's available today has spent several centuries immersed in black mud and salt water. What it smells like now is open to question...in other words does it smell like it smelled when it was first produced? If not, what does it small like? But if you want to reclaim the sweet birch oil fragrance, you can buy birch oil on the internet. I'd try putting a thin layer on, rubbing it in with your hands so that the warmth from your hands makes it soak into the leather.

I've been told that no one really knows what the original, non-shipwrecked Russia calf looked like. No examples (or very few) exist. I can't vouch for that statement...as I have also been told that bound books from the 18th century do exist.

I don't know of any commercially available genuine Russia calf that is from new production although there is a tannery in Sweden that is doing Reindeer and currying with birch tar. Aside from the historic stuff from the Metta Catharina, most everything on the market is chrome or chrome/veg tanned. Not the same process, not the same feel, not the same smell.

PS...the cross-hatching on the original would have been applied as well...by hand. The hides coming off the animal don't have that character and in fact even shoes made with the original MC Russia calf exhibit flattening when drafted over the toe or heel--a sure sign that the texture is not natural.

--
Edited by DWFII - 10/11/14 at 7:09am
post #11022 of 19043
I have a pair of shoe where there is a commando sole at the fore part of the sole and at the heel. The sole before the heel is leather. Since I intend to wear the shoes in inclement weather what do you think about Obenaufs on the leather part to help shield from the moisture and salt?
post #11023 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

I have a pair of shoe where there is a commando sole at the fore part of the sole and at the heel. The sole before the heel is leather. Since I intend to wear the shoes in inclement weather what do you think about Obenaufs on the leather part to help shield from the moisture and salt?

 

I use Leather Honey on that part of the sole...read back a few pages and there is some posts about oils making leather soles less durable etc..however that part of the sole will never be in contact with the ground. 

post #11024 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

I have a pair of shoe where there is a commando sole at the fore part of the sole and at the heel. The sole before the heel is leather. Since I intend to wear the shoes in inclement weather what do you think about Obenaufs on the leather part to help shield from the moisture and salt?

If it's simply cemented to the forepart, you run the risk of the oil migrating into the leather under the rubber and weakening the bond of the cement.

Better to rub down with pure beeswax or paraffin.
post #11025 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post
 

I'd send them back to AE for refurb...less than 200 bucks and they're good as new!

Cobbler. Don't ever go to AE recrafting. Send them to B Nelson. Last time I sent my Hanover wholecut for a repair, they put a whole gap 1/10 of an inch in it. Looked like hell.

 

B. Nelson is your best bet.

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