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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 733

post #10981 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Holy fucking shit, you did it again!!!!!!!!11 RENOVATEUR AND MDO LOTION ARE NOT STRIPPERS THEY ARE WATER BASED.

Holy shit! I'm so sorry... 

 

Yes, reading comprehension is now necessary...

post #10982 of 19259
FWIW, there are many different views on the effect of solvents on leather as well as different types of solvents. Ron Rider is a huge advocate of turpentine for a lot of different things, DW is not. YMMV. Also, GlenKaren products use orange turpenes, which evaporates something like 3 times faster than turpentine, the logic there is that while it is a stripper, it doesn't stick around long enough to do as much damage.

I personally hate Saphir wax. There is too much turpentine in it and it takes too long to dry before you can buff to a good shine and even longer to dry if you are bulling your shoes. I can't comment on other polishes as I haven't used the other ones in probably a decade.
post #10983 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

FWIW, there are many different views on the effect of solvents on leather as well as different types of solvents. Ron Rider is a huge advocate of turpentine for a lot of different things, DW is not. YMMV. Also, GlenKaren products use orange turpenes, which evaporates something like 3 times faster than turpentine, the logic there is that while it is a stripper, it doesn't stick around long enough to do as much damage.

I personally hate Saphir wax. There is too much turpentine in it and it takes too long to dry before you can buff to a good shine and even longer to dry if you are bulling your shoes. I can't comment on other polishes as I haven't used the other ones in probably a decade.

I used to have this problem where Saphir wax took too long to dry, and I had to leave it for over hours. It dries up with this texture that takes forever to buff off.

post #10984 of 19259
I've shared that same experience.

To all of the Saphir wax I have I cut an X right into the tin and left it open for a few days. Now it is much harder and takes far less time to use it for bulling.
post #10985 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've shared that same experience.

I wonder if a pig bristle brush is the key to it. I prefer soft brush, not stiff brushes, unless desperate measures.

post #10986 of 19259
The best brush I own is a 10 year old Kiwi brush. The years of using it has softened it significantly and it doesn't pit the surface of polished shoes. It almost bulls them similar to quick polishes with stockings or something. I tried a goat hair brush as they are soft as hell, but I didn't like the results actually. I think the texture of horsehair is necessary to get a good shine, but in newer brushes they are too stiff for optimal use. I tell people to go to a garage sale, or antique dealer and pick up really old used ones for like a $1.
post #10987 of 19259

Oh, as of bulling, guess what. I left a tin to dry with the lid slightly off. Guess what - when I try to mirror, it doesn't produce a completely smooth surface like when it was still soft. The hardened wax tends to drag and at some point even scratch the finish. And don't tell me about the cloth - properly moistened Selvyt isn't shit.

post #10988 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The best brush I own is a 10 year old Kiwi brush. The years of using it has softened it significantly and it doesn't pit the surface of polished shoes. It almost bulls them similar to quick polishes with stockings or something. I tried a goat hair brush as they are soft as hell, but I didn't like the results actually. I think the texture of horsehair is necessary to get a good shine, but in newer brushes they are too stiff for optimal use. I tell people to go to a garage sale, or antique dealer and pick up really old used ones for like a $1.

Still waiting and finding one...

 

I am using goat hairs, however.

post #10989 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Oh, as of bulling, guess what. I left a tin to dry with the lid slightly off. Guess what - when I try to mirror, it doesn't produce a completely smooth surface like when it was still soft. The hardened wax tends to drag and at some point even scratch the finish. And don't tell me about the cloth - properly moistened Selvyt isn't shit.

You have to add more water and lighten up with the pressure.
post #10990 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


You have to add more water and lighten up with the pressure.

I'll see if that work. Thanks.

post #10991 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Thank you very much, guys, for your useful comments on Renopur. I quess there can't be any harm in trying them on pair of shoes, a couple of times. Yours, Munky

 

By the way, a lot of guys are constantly talking about conditioning or moisturising their shoes, as if it's something that needs doing every week.  It doesn't.  Leather doesn't dry out, at least not fast, and especially not if it normally has a tidy coat of polish.  If your shoes have got very wet, or many polishings over weeks or months require you to strip away excess wax, that might be a good time for a "reno" of some sort - and I find this a very good one.  But don't be rubbing oils and waxes into your shoes like it's your mama's night cream.  They just don't need it, in my humble opinion.

post #10992 of 19259

I only pamper much of the shoes when they arrived new or when they came back from recrafting. Otherwise, I wouldn't polish calf after 10 wears and shell after half a year. Remember, brushes are shoes' best friend.

post #10993 of 19259

Hi Mimo, no, I don't think I phrased that very well. I wasn't about to do multiple applications of Renopur. I just thought I would use it, very infrequently, on one pair of shoes and see what happened. :)

post #10994 of 19259
I think the best shoe care is simply not wearing your shoes and keeping them placed nicely on top of your dresser.
post #10995 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think the best shoe care is simply not wearing your shoes and keeping them placed nicely on top of your dresser.

LOL!!! Yes that is the best solution. Don't forget to stuff shoe trees into the shoes and put them inside shoe bags, then box them and leave them there LOLOLOL!!!!!

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