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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 732

post #10966 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelonius View Post


I heard someone giving the advice a long time ago to take new leather-soled shoes and walk them a few hours on a concrete path strewn with a reasonable layer of sand so that the grains of silica etc become embedded in the surface. Not easy to do perhaps, but have you any views on this ?

I don't. Seems somewhat counter-intuitive, doesn't it? Except that in this day and age that's most likely what we do even if we aren't really trying. Many urban surfaces we walk on are comprised of grit that sooner or later becomes sand-like.

To take that to its logical extreme...when I was doing shoe repair, I saw many work boots with crepe soles. They'd pick up sand and even small, sharp pebbles pretty easy...sometimes the grit would be embedded so deep in the rubber that you couldn't know it was there until your recently sharpened knife hit it. But it didn't stop the rubber from wearing out...and pretty fast.
post #10967 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

People have different views on it because it is a stripper. It cuts grease and it is an irritant. It's not good for your skin, so why would it be acceptable for leather? That's the logic at least.

Saphir MDO lotion is a stripper? Wow... Something I just knew.... It does clean, but condition the heck out of the leather. My major complaint would have also been with the high wax content.

post #10968 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelonius View Post
 


I heard someone giving the advice a long time ago to take new leather-soled shoes and walk them a few hours on a concrete path strewn with a reasonable layer of sand so that the grains of silica etc become embedded in the surface. Not easy to do perhaps, but have you any views on this

I know I have to oil and grease my leather sole before they leave the door. For everyday cleaning, it's all about water, a stiff brush, another softer dauber brush, and a pointy tip knife to get rid of the pebbles and sands.

post #10969 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I know I have to oil and grease my leather sole before they leave the door. For everyday cleaning, it's all about water, a stiff brush, another softer dauber brush, and a pointy tip knife to get rid of the pebbles and sands.

I think the oil and grease are counter-productive. They just soften the leather and not only make it more vulnerable to abrasion but pick up detritus that much faster. And water isn't much better--leather is the easiest to cut when it is wet--soft, IOW.

When you think about it, grit is what cuts and destroys leather. Would you sprinkle glass dust on the creases of your shoes? Of course not...and wax or oil in the creases only hold the grit in place.

If the outsole has grit deliberately embedded in it, it can never be free of the material and abrasive action. Not even on grass. If pavement wears leather away, why would you want to carry around your own special section of sidewalk?
post #10970 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I think the oil and grease are counter-productive. They just soften the leather and not only make it more vulnerable to abrasion but pick up detritus that much faster. And water isn't much better--leather is the easiest to cut when it is wet--soft, IOW.

When you think about it, grit is what cuts and destroys leather. Would you sprinkle glass dust on the creases of your shoes? Of course not...and wax or oil in the creases only hold the grit in place.

If the outsole has grit deliberately embedded in it, it can never be free of the material and abrasive action. Not even on grass. If pavement wears leather away, why would you want to carry around your own special section of sidewalk?

Oil and grease, yes, but the footwear does not immediately hit the street, DW. I have to let them thoroughly absorbed, and I walk on carpet for many hours first before I hit the footwear on concrete. Furthermore, I always make sure the oils and greases were thoroughly absorbed, so that slime and grit mess wouldn't form.

 

Oiling when damp and sufficient grease will not soften the leather, AFAIK. Cleaning the sole with water and a brush seems to pick off many nasty combination of wet leaves, mud, and the slime+grit formula.

post #10971 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Oil and grease, yes, but the footwear does not immediately hit the street, DW. I have to let them thoroughly absorbed, and I walk on carpet for many hours first before I hit the footwear on concrete. Furthermore, I always make sure the oils and greases were thoroughly absorbed, so that slime and grit mess wouldn't form.

Oiling when damp and sufficient grease will not soften the leather, AFAIK. Cleaning the sole with water and a brush seems to pick off many nasty combination of wet leaves, mud, and the slime+grit formula.

Oil and grease, even when absorbed, loosen the fiber mat. If you doubt that take any piece of leather and let it sit in a pan of neatsfoot oil over night (this simulates oiling leather repeatedly) then let it dry as long as you like. The result will still be limp and soft. And, depending on how much oil has been absorbed...overnight or over the course of a year...the leather will never recover.

When the fiber mat is loosened the leather is much more vulnerable to abrasion. And far more open to the embedding of grit.

If you think about it logically...it's not magic, the grease/oil is still there. No matter how long you let it sit.

They used to market oil (and butyl rubber) impregnated soles to the shoe trade...in my experience they didn't last any longer than high quality, dry, veg tanned outsoles.
post #10972 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Oil and grease, even when absorbed, loosen the fiber mat. If you doubt that take any piece of leather and let it sit in a pan of neatsfoot oil over night (this simulates oiling leather repeatedly) then let it dry as long as you like. The result will still be limp and soft.

When the fiber mat is loosened the leather is much more vulnerable to abrasion. And far more open to the embedding of grit.

If you think about it logically...it's not magic, the grease/oil is still there. No matter how long you let it sit.

Well, I wouldn't doubt. However, I must note that I rarely oil the leather, except for the first time. I don't oil leather repeatedly. I've suffered the result of repeated oiling once, and I don't think if I want to experience that again. Oiling when damp, AFAIK, does not loosen the fibers of the leather far too much. From the results that I got, I suppose oiling when damp doesn't hurt, but actually giving more benefits. Oil replace the temporary moisture gradually, prevent over oiling as much as under oiling. 

 

Anyway, as with all treatments, I constantly brush treated leather. I guess polish isn't yet leather's best friend. A brush is more likely.

post #10973 of 19061
From my perspective, you'd be far better off regularly rubbing a lump of beeswax or an old candle on the bottom of your leather soles than applying oil or grease...even infrequently.

FWIW...
post #10974 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Saphir MDO lotion is a stripper? Wow... Something I just knew.... It does clean, but condition the heck out of the leather. My major complaint would have also been with the high wax content.
you need to both read this thread and work on your reading comprehension. Saphir leather lotion is water based. Their polishes contain turpentine.
post #10975 of 19061
The only time I apply anything to the bottoms of my shoes is after I walked in the rain and they had time to dry out.
post #10976 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


you need to both read this thread and work on your reading comprehension. Saphir leather lotion is water based. Their polishes contain turpentine.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The only time I apply anything to the bottoms of my shoes is after I walked in the rain and they had time to dry out.

I read this thread for months now, Pat. Still, I'm fairly surprise if Saphir Lotion is a stripper. In my knowledge, when it comes to stripper, it's more like a mixture of denatured alcohol and acetone, or turp spirit. What I know is that Saphir MDO Lotion or Reno can be extreme in cleaning, but they do condition the heck out of the leather as well.

 

Reading comprehensions? No thanks, sir, for that used to be a nitemare back in highschool LOL. 

 

And as of the sole, lemme guess, rain water act as temporary moisture while whatever you're gonna apply next will take place slowly as that moisture evaporate, yes? 

post #10977 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The only time I apply anything to the bottoms of my shoes is after I walked in the rain and they had time to dry out.

Well, wax wouldn't hurt--when I finish up an outsole I wax the bottoms good...most bespoke makers do...sometimes I even bull the forepart. But leaving them to dry...slowly...is probably all you really need to do.

If I think about it...and if I were worried...I might even recommend getting a can of Johnson's paste floor wax, a paste furniture wax, or Renaissance wax and applying a light ("thin to win") coat when the soles were thoroughly dry.

Like I said, it can't hurt.

Water, of any kind, causes the leather to swell up and the bonds between the fibers to weaken. If you oil your outsoles while the leather is wet, you will delay the drying process--sometimes good, sometimes bad. But yes, the oil will remain on the surface...it will not penetrate the leather much, if at all.

Not something I'd do, in any case.
post #10978 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post


I read this thread for months now, Pat. Still, I'm fairly surprise if Saphir Lotion is a stripper. In my knowledge, when it comes to stripper, it's more like a mixture of denatured alcohol and acetone, or turp spirit. What I know is that Saphir MDO Lotion or Reno can be extreme in cleaning, but they do condition the heck out of the leather as well.

Reading comprehensions? No thanks, sir, for that used to be a nitemare back in highschool LOL. 

And as of the sole, lemme guess, rain water act as temporary moisture while whatever you're gonna apply next will take place slowly as that moisture evaporate, yes? 

Holy fucking shit, you did it again!!!!!!!!11 RENOVATEUR AND MDO LOTION ARE NOT STRIPPERS THEY ARE WATER BASED.
post #10979 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Well, wax wouldn't hurt--when I finish up an outsole I wax the bottoms good...most bespoke makers do...sometimes I even bull the forepart. But leaving them to dry...slowly...is probably all you really need to do.

If I think about it...and if I were worried...I might even recommend getting a can of Johnson's paste floor wax, a paste furniture wax, or Renaissance wax and applying a light ("thin to win") coat when the soles were thoroughly dry.

Like I said, it can't hurt.

I hear you. I just think after taking a couple of strides on the pavement it pretty much becomes moot.
post #10980 of 19061
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Edited by patrickBOOTH - 12/12/14 at 5:56pm
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