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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 731

post #10951 of 19076
Bick 4, Glen Karen shoe cream (for Wolverine 1000 Miles), Red Wing boot cream (for Red Wing Beckmans; beats me, though, if it's got silicone in it), and this leftover bottle of Red Wing-brand non-silicone waterproof protector. Sound like a winning setup?
post #10952 of 19076

My posh shoe shop sells a product called Renapur Balsam. It contains  a 'combination of natural waxes and oils including Beeswax, Carnauba wax, Jojoba oil and Avocado oil...'  The company claim that the balsam will not dry up, even if the lid is left off.

 

Does this sound like a reasonable thing to put on your shoes?

post #10953 of 19076

I've been using that secretly for the last ten years, initially for bike leathers, but it's a brilliant conditioner for shoes.  PH neutral, lasts forever and you only need the tiniest bit to keep your leather supple: just remove the excess wax, apply the tiniest amount of balsam (by which I mean one little dab of the sponge into the pot will do the whole shoe), and leave it overnight so absorb before you wax or cream polish again.  I think it's brilliant.  I use it on leather bags, upholstery (but not nubuck), jackets, all kinds of things.

post #10954 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Glen Karen, Lincoln, Robson's, Angelus... Anything but Kiwi smile.gif

Um, no. GlenKaren, Lexol, Bick 4.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

I've been using that secretly for the last ten years, initially for bike leathers, but it's a brilliant conditioner for shoes.  PH neutral, lasts forever and you only need the tiniest bit to keep your leather supple: just remove the excess wax, apply the tiniest amount of balsam (by which I mean one little dab of the sponge into the pot will do the whole shoe), and leave it overnight so absorb before you wax or cream polish again.  I think it's brilliant.  I use it on leather bags, upholstery (but not nubuck), jackets, all kinds of things.

If it contains what Munky says it doesn't even have a pH because it isn't water based and it contains only non-polar molecules.
post #10955 of 19076
Just to throw this in here. I somewhat like the idea of conditioners that don't contain beeswax. I feel, to some degree, a lot of the heavily beeswaxes conditioners that are the constancy of a cream polish has too much wax in it where the oils just get caught up in it. and the beeswax just end up building on the shoe over time making subsequent applications less and less useful. Conditioners that contain no solvent, and no wax while conditioning ensure your shoes aren't being overwaxed in the process. Annual, or semi annual cleaner/conditioner from GlenKaren seems to address this issue as well as it helps to remove a lot of wax, while having a seemingly high concentration of coconut oil as well.
post #10956 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by ML594806 View Post
 

 

Very detailed answer, many thanks for that. I probably got the last of the #3s. To be honest what I found upsetting about the answer is the fact that I had explained how I care for my shoes, and they essentially copy pasted my e-mail back as advice (shoe trees, storing in a dry and ventilated place, alternating shoes, etc...). Also, I asked for information on how to get the shoes resoled and they didn't bother answering that question. I do understand the inevitable downturn in material quality some people call modernization. But I don't pay £350 for a pair of shoes made in England for it to last me the same as a cheap high street chain chinese pair. It defeats the purpose of aiming for quality.

 

 

I never meant to say it was ridiculous. Apologies if I came across wrong. I honestly didn't understand how you'd gotten to 11 wears. I even reviewed my post to see whether I'd explained it wrong. They didn't offer any useful advice I'm afraid. Or any direction. Or answered my question on the resoling process. They did refer me to the store, but unfortunately I don't keep receipts so that's not going to be very helpful (and this is entirely my fault).

 

 

I seems so. It's tranquilizing to see it's within normality. As I said in my post, I've never needed formal shoes before so it came as a shock to me that these would only last for a year. Is there any dignified way of wearing toe taps? Any suggestions? I'd say it's probably the way to go if the pattern is repeated.


Of course, if you're not adverse to the appearance, you could ask your shoe repair shop to stick on some rubber half soles and heels, and just replace those. The leather soles will last for years.

post #10957 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelonius View Post


Of course, if you're not adverse to the appearance, you could ask your shoe repair shop to stick on some rubber half soles and heels, and just replace those. The leather soles will last for years.

You must be referring to sole guards...AKA Topy. Otherwise the leather sole would not even be there to last however long you think it might.

A "half sole" replaces the leather entirely in the forepart.

Either way, if you're not adverse to looking like an arriviste, it might indeed be an alternative to expecting...much less demanding...better quality.

biggrin.gif
post #10958 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


You must be referring to sole guards...AKA Topy. Otherwise the leather sole would not even be there to last however long you think it might.

A "half sole" replaces the leather entirely in the forepart.

Either way, if you're not adverse to looking like an arriviste, it might indeed be an alternative to expecting...much less demanding...better quality.

biggrin.gif


Yes, thanks for the correction. Sole guards then. There are no "Topy" guards in the UK, AFAIK. I'm not sure what it's got to do with being "arriviste". Maybe that word's definition also changes somewhere in mid-Atlantic.

post #10959 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelonius View Post


Yes, thanks for the correction. Sole guards then. There are no "Topy" guards in the UK, AFAIK. I'm not sure what it's got to do with being "arriviste". Maybe that word's definition also changes somewhere in mid-Atlantic.

Probably not. Maybe "vulgarian" or "parvenu" would translate better.

It's just that some people...myself included (and this is just personal opinion)...think that rubber soles are a bit cloddish esp. on high end shoes--aspiring to sophistication without all the work and deliberation that is normally associated with fine things.

Maybe that's a hang-over from an earlier age and a different social paradigm, when no one even had to tell you that. But it also might have to do with a certain slippery slope of indifference that goes well beyond the issue of shoes or clothing.

Of course it's neither here nor there what I think in this regard, but as I mentioned...or implied...it's really the customer that's driving the race to the bottom. If the customer (as a metaphor for all customers and demand) accepts poor quality...never speaking, never objecting, never questioning...eventually good quality, nevermind exceptional quality, will go by the way.

As it already has to a large extent.

--
Edited by DWFII - 10/10/14 at 7:25am
post #10960 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post



Um, no. GlenKaren, Lexol, Bick 4.

If it contains what Munky says it doesn't even have a pH because it isn't water based and it contains only non-polar molecules.

 



I thought Bick 4 was a conditioner rather than a polish. Or perhaps a conditioner with polishing properties, as Bickmore tells it.

Are people's avoidance of turpentine because of an ill effect on leather or purely because of the smell?
post #10961 of 19076
I can't speak too much on Bick 4 as I never used it, but if DW digs it, I trust him.
post #10962 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Just to throw this in here. I somewhat like the idea of conditioners that don't contain beeswax. I feel, to some degree, a lot of the heavily beeswaxes conditioners that are the constancy of a cream polish has too much wax in it where the oils just get caught up in it. and the beeswax just end up building on the shoe over time making subsequent applications less and less useful. Conditioners that contain no solvent, and no wax while conditioning ensure your shoes aren't being overwaxed in the process. Annual, or semi annual cleaner/conditioner from GlenKaren seems to address this issue as well as it helps to remove a lot of wax, while having a seemingly high concentration of coconut oil as well.

This is the reason why I use Saphir MDO lotion instead of Reno. 

 

However, my main point to emphasize would be the practice of brushing your shoes a lot more. That will help flatten up the wax to the thinnest film.

post #10963 of 19076
People have different views on it because it is a stripper. It cuts grease and it is an irritant. It's not good for your skin, so why would it be acceptable for leather? That's the logic at least.
post #10964 of 19076

Thank you very much, guys, for your useful comments on Renopur. I quess there can't be any harm in trying them on pair of shoes, a couple of times. Yours, Munky

post #10965 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Probably not. Maybe "vulgarian" or "parvenu" would translate better.

It's just that some people...myself included (and this is just personal opinion)...think that rubber soles are a bit cloddish esp. on high end shoes--aspiring to sophistication without all the work and deliberation that is normally associated with fine things.

Maybe that's a hang-over from an earlier age and a different social paradigm, when no one even had to tell you that. But it also might have to do with a certain slippery slope of indifference that goes well beyond the issue of shoes or clothing.

Of course it's neither here nor there what I think in this regard, but as I mentioned...or implied...it's really the customer that's driving the race to the bottom. If the customer (as a metaphor for all customers and demand) accepts poor quality...never speaking, never objecting, never questioning...eventually good quality, nevermind exceptional quality, will go by the way.

As it already has to a large extent.

--


I heard someone giving the advice a long time ago to take new leather-soled shoes and walk them a few hours on a concrete path strewn with a reasonable layer of sand so that the grains of silica etc become embedded in the surface. Not easy to do perhaps, but have you any views on this ?

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