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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 714

post #10696 of 19272
Lemon juice squeezed from a lemon not bootled lemon juice.
post #10697 of 19272
I just received my first pair of Goyser welted Dinkelacker boots. I thought the conventional wisdom was that the Goyser welt is more waterproof than Goodyear, but then I saw this post by DWFII where he mentioned that if the thread wasn't properly waxed it could actually wick moisture into the shoe. Do any of you that own Goyser welted shoes do any sort of maintenance on the welt stitching? Should I periodically hit it with some clear wax to keep it sealed?

post #10698 of 19272
Any chance of restoring these Bass shoes to a wearable condition? My cat decided they looked like a scratching post. I wrote these off a long time ago but just pulled them out of my closet recently so I figured I would see if anything could be done.
post #10699 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

I just received my first pair of Goyser welted Dinkelacker boots. I thought the conventional wisdom was that the Goyser welt is more waterproof than Goodyear, but then I saw this post by DWFII where he mentioned that if the thread wasn't properly waxed it could actually wick moisture into the shoe. Do any of you that own Goyser welted shoes do any sort of maintenance on the welt stitching? Should I periodically hit it with some clear wax to keep it sealed?

Just a note of clarification...my intent with that comment was to speak to waxing and waxes more than anything else. FWIW, however, any thread that is exposed to the environment can, and often does, wick moisture...esp. from wet to dry.

Beyond that, even though it's not the same kind of wax as handwax or intended for the same purpose, putting shoe polish/wax on the threads occasionally, won't hurt them, you know. Other than that I wouldn't worry too much.
post #10700 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Just a note of clarification...my intent with that comment was to speak to waxing and waxes more than anything else. FWIW, however, any thread that is exposed to the environment can, and often does, wick moisture...esp. from wet to dry.

Beyond that, even though it's not the same kind of wax as handwax or intended for the same purpose, putting shoe polish/wax on the threads occasionally, won't hurt them, you know. Other than that I wouldn't worry too much.

Thanks DWFII!
post #10701 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik Telford View Post

Any chance of restoring these Bass shoes to a wearable condition? My cat decided they looked like a scratching post. I wrote these off a long time ago but just pulled them out of my closet recently so I figured I would see if anything could be done.

Some conditioner and/or shoe cream and these will look a lot better, but the damage of the leather will not be restored.
post #10702 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by jorijori View Post

Hi guys,

To remove food oil stain from brown shoes is to dab some lemon juice directly on the stain.

I had the same thing happened to me twice on different shoes, chinese food soup & some pizza cheese. At first I tried with leather shampoo & sneaker cleaner, no luck.

So I searched on SF, lemon juice is the best. You need to do it multiple times, dab & let it dry till stain disappear. Let us know how it work. Good luck.

You're absolutely correct. This is why I recommend vinegar. It is because it is acidic, which is the way the natural leather fibers want to be. Leather is amphoteric so when anything above the isoelectric point of leather (~5.5) comes in contact the leather acts as litmus paper and shows a mark. You need to shift the fibers back down to about 3-5 on the pH scale.
post #10703 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


You're absolutely correct. This is why I recommend vinegar. It is because it is acidic, which is the way the natural leather fibers want to be. Leather is amphoteric so when anything above the isoelectric point of leather (~5.5) comes in contact the leather acts as litmus paper and shows a mark. You need to shift the fibers back down to about 3-5 on the pH scale.


PB, I do not follow your point. Many (possibly most) organic molecules are amphoteric. Litmus paper changes colour according to the pH of the solution it is dipped in. It has an impregnated pigment that is sensitive to pH and changes colour accordingly, as is the case with many molecules in nature.  Is this the case with shoe leather ? That's to say, if the shoe leather is dipped in an (otherwise) identical solution at one pH or another (above or below the average isoelectric point of the material) the leather will change colour ?

post #10704 of 19272
It was just a simplified comparison, not meant to be literal. Any liquid will discolor it temporarily, but a higher pH than the isoelectric point will shift the pH alkaline, which will repel the other negatively charged stuff in the leather such as the fat liquors and dyes. It essentially begins to revert it to rawhide and causing a mark.
post #10705 of 19272
can a cobbler repair the lining of the boot around the heel area? mine is wearing out, slightly peeling... any suggestions?
post #10706 of 19272

It was just a simplified comparison, not meant to be literal.

 

PB, I love the way that you sometimes go into reverse!  :lol: 

post #10707 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by kashmir View Post

can a cobbler repair the lining of the boot around the heel area? mine is wearing out, slightly peeling... any suggestions?
My old cobbler placed a piece of leather (smooth or felt were my options) and stitched it in place.
post #10708 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by DpprDr View Post

My old cobbler placed a piece of leather (smooth or felt were my options) and stitched it in place.

hmmm... so the stitching can be seen from the other side?
post #10709 of 19272

So yesterday I polished up my shoe to a pretty shine and left it to dry over night to finish my shine today and I got to work. But when I did, the shine from the previous day was getting messed up and got more matte instead of becoming more shiny. Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong? Do I just need to apply more layers? I'm following J. Fitzpatrick's method of mirror shining at the moment.

post #10710 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by SushiOfTheGods View Post
 

So yesterday I polished up my shoe to a pretty shine and left it to dry over night to finish my shine today and I got to work. But when I did, the shine from the previous day was getting messed up and got more matte instead of becoming more shiny. Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong? Do I just need to apply more layers? I'm following J. Fitzpatrick's method of mirror shining at the moment.


too much polish, esp if a soft cloth leaves a trail when you rub

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