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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 711

post #10651 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTukker View Post

Not sure if this has been mentioned here before, but how do people re-attach insoles? Glue or something else?

Is it really an insole you're talking about...or a sockliner?

A photo would go down good right about now.
post #10652 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Is it really an insole you're talking about...or a sockliner?

A photo would go down good right about now.

Thanks DWFII - you are correct of course; meant a sockliner. Any suggestions how to re-attach?
post #10653 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTukker View Post

Thanks DWFII - you are correct of course; meant a sockliner. Any suggestions how to re-attach?

Go down to the local shoe repair shop and buy a small tube of Barge, Apply it liberally on the bottom side of the sock liner...right out to the edge. Slide the sockliner in while the cement is still wet. Gently press into place, esp. on the leading edge. Allow to dry/cure overnight.

Good to go.
post #10654 of 19038

When I re-polish my shoes, do I have to use a product to remove the previous layer of cream?

Thank you!

post #10655 of 19038

AlChl,

In a word, no. Don't use a product to remove the previous 'layer of cream', unless you really need to. And that is almost never. As a regular shoe-wearer, I can't imagine a situation in which I would have to use such a product. As you will find from reading through this thread, the point is to use very little cream or wax when you polish your shoes. And if it doubt, brush them rather than polish them. 

post #10656 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

AlChl,

In a word, no. Don't use a product to remove the previous 'layer of cream', unless you really need to. And that is almost never. As a regular shoe-wearer, I can't imagine a situation in which I would have to use such a product. As you will find from reading through this thread, the point is to use very little cream or wax when you polish your shoes. And if it doubt, brush them rather than polish them. 

 

Oh ok, it was just a little doubt that came to my mind, thank you for the answer :)

post #10657 of 19038

I bought a pair of nearly-beautiful AE Ridgeways. They have a beautiful Cognac Dublin Horween leather, sitting on top of what I find to be an ugly, bright, neon orange welt.

 

What are the thoughts on recoloring a welt? Should a cobbler be able to do this without a resole? I like the mini-lug half-sole on these and would like to avoid resoling.

 

Can I just use a dark edge-dressing (such as AE's dressing)?  Should I use the Saphir dressing instead?  Silly me, I tried to use shoe cream, but it wasn't nearly thick or dark enough and it simply dyed the stitching...

post #10658 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by rostov View Post

I bought a pair of nearly-beautiful AE Ridgeways. They have a beautiful Cognac Dublin Horween leather, sitting on top of what I find to be an ugly, bright, neon orange welt.

What are the thoughts on recoloring a welt? Should a cobbler be able to do this without a resole? I like the mini-lug half-sole on these and would like to avoid resoling.

Can I just use a dark edge-dressing (such as AE's dressing)?  Should I use the Saphir dressing instead?  Silly me, I tried to use shoe cream, but it wasn't nearly thick or dark enough and it simply dyed the stitching...

Chances are there is some sort of finish on the welt. Shoe creams do have dye in them...along with wax...but it should have darkened the welt somewhat if it were not finished.

Now that you've waxed the welt with the cream it will be even harder to dye uniformly.

IMO the unfinished welt tells the world you have new shoes. It also is probably more appropriate to a shoe with a lug sole than a shoe that is "dressier."

The best advice (and the least hassle) is to avoid obsessing about it--it will get dark and dirty all by itself soon enough.
post #10659 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Go down to the local shoe repair shop and buy a small tube of Barge, Apply it liberally on the bottom side of the sock liner...right out to the edge. Slide the sockliner in while the cement is still wet. Gently press into place, esp. on the leading edge. Allow to dry/cure overnight.

Good to go.

Terrific - many thanks DWFII!
post #10660 of 19038

Does Obenauf's LP make leather expand or contract? What about boot oils?

 

I'm trying to figure out what to use for a pair of steerhide boots for wearing on an upcoming (part-vacation) trip to seattle. This pair is a perfect fit as of now, and I'm wondering if stuffing it with the aforementioned oily substances will change the fit much.

post #10661 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Go down to the local shoe repair shop and buy a small tube of Barge, Apply it liberally on the bottom side of the sock liner...right out to the edge. Slide the sockliner in while the cement is still wet. Gently press into place, esp. on the leading edge. Allow to dry/cure overnight.

Good to go.


DW,

 

When I use Barge I always follow the instructions, apply it to both surfaces, usually two coats for leather and let it dry thoroughly before putting them together. I assumed this made for a stronger bond. Is the method suggested here specific to re-attaching a sock liner- where it would be the only way that would work? Or is it generally acceptable to put the items together while the Barge is still wet? Thanks

post #10662 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post


DW,

When I use Barge I always follow the instructions, apply it to both surfaces, usually two coats for leather and let it dry thoroughly before putting them together. I assumed this made for a stronger bond. Is the method suggested here specific to re-attaching a sock liner- where it would be the only way that would work? Or is it generally acceptable to put the items together while the Barge is still wet? Thanks

That's a very good question...good on you.

No, the instructions on the package are correct if you want the best bond. But for sockliners or heel pads where positioning the leather would be difficult down inside the shoe when the cement was at maximum tack, doing it wet is the best and most hassle free way..esp. if you put it on liberally and only on the sockliner, gently press it into place, and allow it 24 hours to cure.
post #10663 of 19038

For those, like me, who worry about turpentine: I got a jar of Loake's cream, today. In a controlled experiment ( n=1)  it was found that it did not smell of turpentine. Loake's wax, did. This leads to - at least - two possible questions. One) Is it the case that Loake's cream really doesn't contain turpentine and 2) if it doesn't, what is in Loake's cream? These are compelling questions!  I remain, as ever...

post #10664 of 19038
Probably Naphtha.
post #10665 of 19038

Does Naptha smell? This cream smells of nothing at all. 

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