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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 709

post #10621 of 19072
I still wouldn't go through all of that. I would just let light and time lighten them up.
post #10622 of 19072
Also, if you want to go that route, don't use Glenkaren conditioner to get the polish off, it has too much oil in it and it make it hard to raise a shine after just polishing. Use Renomat and then cordovan cream or GlenKaren polish in a color you like to condition and shine.
post #10623 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It amazes me that one website out there years ago wrote no cream on shell and now everybody believes it.

My advice to you, is brush them, maybe put a light layer of wax polish and brush again. That's it.

StyFo Myth #38: Mac method.
post #10624 of 19072
I've posted numerous times about the mac method. Don't make me do a search and find them again. All in all: It's bullshit.
post #10625 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've posted numerous times about the mac method. Don't make me do a search and find them again. All in all: It's bullshit.

"You are out of your line, son." - StyFo wisdom.
post #10626 of 19072

--deleted--posted when drunk early--

post #10627 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post

--deleted--posted when drunk early--

Lies. SF and drunk doesn't correlate.
post #10628 of 19072

Hi. Just a question about best practice for use of shoe trees. In particular St Crispins hollow trees. Do you put them in right after taking your shoes off or do you let the shoes air out for a while? (wondering about sweat from wearing them all day). 

 

Thanks. 

post #10629 of 19072

Isn't Mac Method just brushing? I gave up on using conditioners/creams/polishes on all of my shoes including calf. All I do is brush the upper and feather line before I wear. 

post #10630 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post

Isn't Mac Method just brushing? I gave up on using conditioners/creams/polishes on all of my shoes including calf. All I do is brush the upper and feather line before I wear. 

Brushing after is more important than brushing ex ante unless you store your shoes in sand boxes.
post #10631 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Brushing after is more important than brushing ex ante unless you store your shoes in sand boxes.

What is your logic for that? 

post #10632 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Well, of course it's not just a matter of replacing the welt, but let's start there.

When welted work evolved circa 16th (?) century, there were no factories. At best you might have found some small workshops employing 3-6 apprentice and journeyman makers. People got their shoes in the locale where they lived, more or less. This condition applied well into the 19th century. 300 years.

Most of the makers didn't really want or need to do repair. Most customers didn't want or need to pay the higher price to have the maker mend holes or replace outsoles. Local or itinerant cobblers did that work. Often with remnants or scraps salvaged from other used shoes.

As we enter the 19th and 20th century we have literally hundreds of years of local cobblers repairing shoes, like as not made hundreds of miles and sometimes several days journey from the owner of the shoes.

A shoe could be reliably repaired by a local craftsman who was, by no means, nor expected to be, as skilled as the maker. Without having to have the original last.

When GY and gemming comes along, this began to change.

Even today, with HW shoes, if the shoe is worn for any length of time after an inseam is damaged, the shoe may become distorted and may not be able to be put back together even by the maker without the original last. If caught soon enough, however...before ripping off ten layers of duct tape becomes necessary, IOW....it is almost a mindless task to simply align the holes in the vamp with the holes in the holdfast and resew the shoes together. Losing nothing of fit or shape. Anyone with a thread and a needle could do it.

Gemming, on the other hand, relies on the cement. Cement that will fail as several people in this thread have pointed out in posts and photos. Once the cement fails, there is no way to put the gemming...and hence the inseam and the vamp...back in the position it was in when it came from the maker. Back when you were so happy with the fit. Only the factory, with their access to the original last, can do this. That's why in most cases a shoe sent back to N'hnts will be fully recrafted with a new insole and new welts.

Goodyear also promotes a dumbing down of the quality of the materials that go into a shoe. At one time the insole was considered the backbone of the shoe. No longer. If a 9 iron leather insole is not needed (because the insole is not being channeled) chances approach unity (100%) that sooner or later a 6 iron insole will be substituted. If a 6 iron leatherboard insole can be subbed for the leather insole, it will be. Sooner or later. And why not? The insole is not really functioning as a a critical component, anymore.

If leatherboard works for insoles, why not heel stacks? And so forth, right up to and including plastic or paper heel and toe stiffeners and corrected grain uppers.

This is happening. Even with cachet brand shoes. I sometimes joke about the boxes being more important to the consumer than the shoes inside. It's all the more ironic in that in some cases the cardboard in the box and the materials used to make insole and heel stacks, etc., start with the same raw ingredients.

Most of the time these issues aren't of concern to the consumer...we live in a disposable society and who cares if the local cobbler is reduced to ladies heels, shoe shines and cutting keys. Most of us will balk at being forced, by circumstance if not intent, to send our shoes across the pond to get repaired. But we are also a society that is OK with dependencies of various and sundry sorts and so we just live with it, never wondering if it was always like this or if there might be a better way..

Again, most of the time these issues are trumped by price considerations--Americans (but not limited to them) "know the price of everything and the value of nothing."--Oscar Wilde

But it's the very same reason why particle board furniture is so rampant...we throw all this stuff away, we expect to throw it away, so it doesn't matter. And it's really kind of scary once you begin to look more closely, how widespread and insidious this philosophy is--it affects nearly every thing we buy and own and every aspect of our lives.

But the thing that is the most troubling is that we then delude ourselves into thinking we're connoisseurs or that we're buying top quality or that we know excellence when we see it.

We don't. We wouldn't know excellence if it smacked us in the face. And if we were told what had just happened, we'd reject it out of hand. Vociferously.

--
Fascinating insight. Yet, at some point leather itself seems like the kind of substance that should fail. What I mean is you could probably find some sort of space age material and production technique comparable to a hw leather shoe? Or is hw leather truly the best?
post #10633 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Also, if you want to go that route, don't use Glenkaren conditioner to get the polish off, it has too much oil in it and it make it hard to raise a shine after just polishing. Use Renomat and then cordovan cream or GlenKaren polish in a color you like to condition and shine.

Interesting. I recently just wiped down a pair of shell boots with a damp cloth, applied a thin coat of GK conditioner, and now for the life of me can't get a shine. The shell feels sticky.

How should I fix this? Reno and buff? If so, I'll have to get some renovateur.
post #10634 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post

What is your logic for that? 

I store cloth in closet after I clean them up. You might have the opposite habit of storing dirty laundry and dirty shoes in your closet.
post #10635 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by V1KTA222 View Post

Interesting. I recently just wiped down a pair of shell boots with a damp cloth, applied a thin coat of GK conditioner, and now for the life of me can't get a shine. The shell feels sticky.

How should I fix this? Reno and buff? If so, I'll have to get some renovateur.

I ran into all types of problems with my shell early on, what I found to be my problem was trying to complete the process too fast.

I had to go undo mistakes with some renomat, then let dry a day, then used some renovateur the next day, then the third day a very light treatment with saphire cordovan cream...brushing. then I literally dont have to do anything to them but brush. I am guessing in 6 months another renoveator and cream treatment.

I get some used shell shoes and follow the same procedure and works wonders.

You are talking about ae right? I spent a week removing the crap they loaded on my burgundy leeds. Used a half bottle of renomat and renovator to get down to the shell. Applied saphire cordovan cream thinly....very happy with now and just brush them
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