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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 708

post #10606 of 18608
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post
 

 

move to california, we have a drought here.  will let dry your cordovan properly.

I don't think I want that... no

post #10607 of 18608
Quote:
Originally Posted by DpprDr View Post


I might be the minority but I only use 2 (one for black and another for tans). Have thought about having an exclusive brush for my light cordovans (i.e., whiskey, Ravello) but I have not gotten around to it.
 

 

I may be in a smaller minority...I have one brush that I use for dusting each day, and one that I use for polishing.  I don't have anything lighter than chestnut and a little bit of mottling doesn't bother me (not that I've seen any, mind you).

post #10608 of 18608

Is it OK to use the same brush to daily dust off both my tan and mid brown shoes? 

post #10609 of 18608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Is it OK to use the same brush to daily dust off both my tan and mid brown shoes?

I really dont think there would be any problem at all!!

post #10610 of 18608

I use three brushes: One for getting the dust off, one for buffing black shoes and one for buffing all other shoes. It might help that all my non-black shoes are some shade of merlot or brown, and with the small amounts of polish I use, I dont really worry about colors spilling over.

post #10611 of 18608
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Sleepyinsanfran got it right, I think. Any structural problem is likely to manifest as a fit or stability problem, sooner or later. Sometimes minor sometimes...not so much.

They're not likely to crumble on your feet, no.

Food for thought...every time you send or take a pair of shoes like that back to the manufacturer, you're forcing the maker to tighten up quality control and maybe even adjust his processes to avoid such losses.

But, inevitably, having to "eat the shoes," also creates pressure to raise prices.
Hmm interesting. Thanks for your insights.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

@AaronC I learnt to let some things go by, a lot less to stress and worry about.
I understand, just wanted to clarify some stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post

 The lack of a bond between the layers in the heel counter might make it get crushed easily and have some unsightly creases on the exterior. It might not be a problem if you use a shoe horn without fail everytime you put these on (but I wouldn't take the risk if these were purchased at full retail
Yup do that religiously. Thanks!
post #10612 of 18608

Thank you, gents, for your help with this!

post #10613 of 18608

Since my unfortunate experiment with Lexol (I didn't realise that it was liquid and manged to pour it into my shoes), I haven't touched it since. I am feeling braver now. How to you used it (the brown bottled)?  Do you use a very little, as with shoe cream and wax? Or do you just generally splosh it all over?  How long do you leave it and do you brush the shoes afterwards? With thanks, as always, M.

post #10614 of 18608
I hold my shoes at a 45 degree angle (sole upwards, heel higher than toe) and literally pour the stuff down the tongue. Then I get my hand in there and slosh it around make sure I get the vamp lining well. If there are remnants I pour the excess into the next shoe the same way right out of the heel. After a while you will get a feel for how much you will need to avoid using too much.

I would also recommend getting the inside moist with diluted vinegar to get the pH back in balance inside the shoe. Accumulated fermented sweat turns very alkaline which reverts the fibers back to rawhide. Without shifting the pH back down it is rather resistant to many conditioners. Get some diluted vinegar in there and shove in the shoe trees. Let it sit over night and the next day use the lexol.
post #10615 of 18608

That sounds very helpful, Patrick!  I will try this very soon. I appreciate your considered response!  Very best wishes, as always, Munky. 

post #10616 of 18608

I know I phrased my question in a fatuous way, but I really am interested in how to use Lexol.  Put the rest down to my being slightly odd. 

post #10617 of 18608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I know I phrased my question in a fatuous way, but I really am interested in how to use Lexol.  Put the rest down to my being slightly odd. 
It's hard to use it wrong....except maybe too often.
post #10618 of 18608
My cobbler apparently applied a layer of cream polish to my shell shoes when doing a heel replacement. He meant well, and is very nice, so I'm not all that upset.
I've searched the thread a bit (but admit I didn't read end to end), and based on what I've read, am I correct that this is what I should do:
1. Renomat or GlenKaren (but not Venetian cream or lexol or anything like that) to strip the polish off
2. Renovateur or creme Universalle to condition the shell after stripping
3. Brush like a madman

Is that about right?

Thanks in advance.
post #10619 of 18608
It amazes me that one website out there years ago wrote no cream on shell and now everybody believes it.

My advice to you, is brush them, maybe put a light layer of wax polish and brush again. That's it.
post #10620 of 18608
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It amazes me that one website out there years ago wrote no cream on shell and now everybody believes it.

My advice to you, is brush them, maybe put a light layer of wax polish and brush again. That's it.

I wouldn't sweat it, but the color darkened and I want to lighten them back up. Should have said that upfront.

Thanks, pB.
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