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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 706

post #10576 of 10585
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Ships passing in the night.

 

thx for the correction

post #10577 of 10585

I suppose I meant "that is a lot of time from someone with those skills for $400". This appears, to me, to be far beyond what one would expect when resoling and restoring the upper. Perhaps DW does this when he resoles shoes he has made (except for the gemming, of course), but it looked like that person should have been making shoes and farmed out the resole to someone else, at a lower rate of pay.

 

From what you experts saw, were those beat up old boots worth that much loving care? They looked much nicer once finished, but the repair work appeared to be several steps up from the original level of construction.

 

Why handwelt to the gemming? Why handsew the outsoles and do all that crafting of the sole edge by hand? I gather the routine cobbler approach would have been a machine to grind it down? I assume this is typical of bespoke handmade, but what was accomplished in this case? My Japanese is a little rusty.

post #10578 of 10585
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

From what you experts saw, were those beat up old boots worth that much loving care? They looked much nicer once finished, but the repair work appeared to be several steps up from the original level of construction.

Why handwelt to the gemming? Why handsew the outsoles and do all that crafting of the sole edge by hand? I gather the routine cobbler approach would have been a machine to grind it down? I assume this is typical of bespoke handmade, but what was accomplished in this case? My Japanese is a little rusty.

Well, you've got a point. When I was repairing the given word was to restore the shoes as close to the original as possible. Not to try to improve the work. In absolute terms, the shoes probably didn't warrant the upgrade.

On the other hand, different people have different priorities and it's not ours to question or to second-guess. Maybe it's enough to say that it was better than throwing them away. I'm not fond of the "disposable society."
post #10579 of 10585

What was probably missed if you don't speak Japanese is that the lady bought the shoes for her now husband about 18 years ago soon after they met and it was one of her first presents to him.  She wanted to surprise him by giving new life to the boots as I am guessing they meant a lot to him (and to her).  So there was quite a bit of sentimentality and emotion behind the effort rather than just "were those boots worth it".

post #10580 of 10585
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post
 

Cemented soles:

 

I don't get the contempt heaped on cemented soles in this thread. That approach is used in a very large number of shoes worn by a very large number of men and most seem quite satisfied with what they get. Far from falling off, it appears that one can cement soles in place very firmly. In my limited experience I have athletic shoes and hiking boots, each subjected to heavy abuse of different kinds. Both types get lots of abrasion, lateral movement and straight ahead pushing, some pulling, often when soaking wet. Both types have cemented soles and those soles have not come loose.

 

In the broader world, as far as I know, professional soccer players wear shoes with cemented soles. So do professional tennis players, basketball players and high altitude mountain climbers. In each of these cases a sole failure would not be merely embarassing, but could threaten the career, or the life, of the professional involved.

 

In these situations there is a great deal at stake. In the case of the athletes there are essentially unlimited funds to pay for the best footwear. Mountain climbers may not have the available cash of an international soccer player, but if they thought an extra thousand or two would significantly increase their chances of making it back down alive I assume they would pay it.


As far as I know (remember, I am not an expert!!) none of these groups wears GYW or HW footwear when they are working.

 

Now, I assume the manufacturers of footwear for these people use methods more reliable than one would get on the proverbial $10 pair from Payless. But that is a reflection on what is available at what price, not an inherent shortcoming of cement.

 

I have not been back to Payless since I discovered ebay, but I don't remember actually seeing shoes that cheap. Maybe $40, but not $10. Of course, it has been a while.

 

I never have had a pair of basketball sneakers, tennis shoes, running shoes etc last more than a year without falling apart....let alone getting a new shoe bottom. So while I get your point and agree not sure that it is valid so much for shoes you plane to keep for 20 years.

post #10581 of 10585
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post
 

Cemented soles:

 

I don't get the contempt heaped on cemented soles in this thread. .... In the broader world, as far as I know, professional soccer players wear shoes with cemented soles. So do professional tennis players, basketball players and high altitude mountain climbers. In each of these cases a sole failure would not be merely embarassing, but could threaten the career, or the life, of the professional involved.

In soccer there's so much turning on one's foot (while said foot is digging into soft ground w cleats), that glued-on soles wouldn't last very long.  I don't know about other sports, but the best soccer cleats (soccer shoes) are stitched-down (usually blake or some version of it). Of course these aren't the same same things as the $40 cleats kids and amateurs play in.  

post #10582 of 10585
Recently purchased some burgundy brogues that just arrived. Upon inspection of these shoes, I realised the lining of the shoes seem to have an air bubble within it and is not firmly attached to the (other side where it is supposed to attach to?) Does this warrant a need to contact the distributors or is it simply an aesthetic issue that doesn't affect the structural integrity of the shoes? My other Loake shoes do not seem to have this problem, not even a pair of locally made $240 shoes.



post #10583 of 10585

Can anybody tell me what are the key things one can do to try and extend the life of ones shoes?

 

1. Decent rotation

 

2. Shoe Trees

 

3. Storing them appropriately in dust bags

 

4. Polishing

 

5. Conditioning - but how often?

 

6. Resoling when appropriate

 

How long can one reasonably expect a well used but well cared for GY welted shoe to last?

 

10 years?

 

15 years?

 

20 years?

post #10584 of 10585
The best way to extend life of your shoes is to limiting their wear and tear. It could be achieved by 1) having a large collection of shoes, 2) having a sedate lifestyle, or 3) not wearing them.

Anything else you could do is minor to the above three methods.
post #10585 of 10585
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

The best way to extend life of your shoes is to limiting their wear and tear. It could be achieved by 1) having a large collection of shoes, 2) having a sedate lifestyle, or 3) not wearing them.

Anything else you could do is minor to the above three methods.

Well put, simple
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