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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 696

post #10426 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post
 

I have a pair of football grain boots from AE.. After some wears, the sole has broken in nicely, but the uppers seem to be still quite stiff even after biweekly application of lexol conditioner. Any ideas on softening them up?

 

Many say the football grain takes a while to break in, not sure anything  but wearing them will take care of it....maybe AE shoe lotion will have a better chance...I know Neatsfoot oil would do the trick but you probably do not want that on your shoes unless they are being used as allweather shoes 

post #10427 of 19058

How worried should I be about dry salt on pavement, in terms of wear to leather soles? I assume it contributes to friction, but is it chemically bad for the soles as well? If so, is there something I can use that will restore the leather without making it softer (and thus more vulnerable to wear from friction)?

post #10428 of 19058
Yes, it is chemically bad. Salt water has a high pH relative to the natural state the protein fibers want to be in. Essentially what happens is it shifts the protein fibers above its isoelectric point. Protein fibers want to be between 3 and 5 on the pH scale and are ionic positive, when a high pH is introduced the fibers shift ionic negative. The other stuff in leather like, dyes, and fat liquors are generally ionic negative so they are attracted to each other. When the protein fibers shift negative it repels the fat liquor and dyes and such. It essentially reverts back to rawhide. The best thing to do is use an acidic solution to shift the fibers below their isoelectric point and then recondition. How to do this? Use some lightly diluted white vinegar and get the salt stains and such off and soak the bottom's fairly well. When it is dry apply a conditioner such as Lexol to replenish the leather. Not doing this can result in cracked leather soles.
post #10429 of 19058

Thanks. So, if I end up wearing leather soles in the salt, I could blot with a bit of white vinegar, allow the shoes to dry on their sides, and then apply leather conditioner? The vinegar would be a bit drying, correct?

 

Should I do the whole process each time I wear the shoes in the salt, or should I do it once every few wearings?

 

Also, when you say "lightly diluted," do you mean "only diluted a little bit," or do you mean "a light dilution (ie, diluted a fair amount)"?

 

If I use balsamic vinegar as opposed to white vinegar, will I eventually end up with an approximation of an oak-bark sole?

 

Sorry for all the questions -- this is all new to me.

post #10430 of 19058

Hello everyone :)

Recently I've bought a pair of Saint Laurent Paris chelsea boots, and, even if they're "just" designer shoes, I'd like to take care of them the best I can and have them last me the longest time possible!

The first thing I will do, will be to bring them to a cobbler to put an addictional rubber outsole over the original leather one(sadly, the original sole is already showing wearing signs after just one time i wore the boots).

Then I want to do all the work with creams, polishes, etc. On the net I've found several tutorials about this topic, but they were always a bit different: one said to give the shoes a first cleaning with a soap, another one with a brush and then a cotton cloth, another one with a brush, then a soap, then a cloath and then a brush again to polish them, etc, so I'm a bit confused :)

I'm thinking of doing this "routine":

clean the boots from eventual dirt with a cloth > apply moisturizer cream > remove the excess cream > apply black polish > remove excess polish > apply a waterproofing product(which one?)

I'd be very happy if you could tell me if the routine I have in my mind is good, if I have to corret something, some little tips on how to do this work or maybe even a tutorial that you think is the best to follow!

Thank you everyone!

post #10431 of 19058
If you wear them in the salt, let them dry on their sides and then use a vinegar solution. Honestly the dilution probably won't matter. Rub them good to get the stains off, let dry then condition. The vinegar is much less drying that the salt.

Think about the tanning process they use chrome salts (generally) to render the fat out of the hide and then sulfuric acid and water solutions to shift the pH back down again. You're essentially rendering all of the fat out of the already tanned leather.

As for your balsamic vinegar question: no. You will only smell more like a salad and probably stain your soles.
post #10432 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlChI View Post

Hello everyone smile.gif
Recently I've bought a pair of Saint Laurent Paris chelsea boots, and, even if they're "just" designer shoes, I'd like to take care of them the best I can and have them last me the longest time possible!
The first thing I will do, will be to bring them to a cobbler to put an addictional rubber outsole over the original leather one(sadly, the original sole is already showing wearing signs after just one time i wore the boots).
Then I want to do all the work with creams, polishes, etc. On the net I've found several tutorials about this topic, but they were always a bit different: one said to give the shoes a first cleaning with a soap, another one with a brush and then a cotton cloth, another one with a brush, then a soap, then a cloath and then a brush again to polish them, etc, so I'm a bit confused smile.gif
I'm thinking of doing this "routine":
clean the boots from eventual dirt with a cloth > apply moisturizer cream > remove the excess cream > apply black polish > remove excess polish > apply a waterproofing product(which one?)
I'd be very happy if you could tell me if the routine I have in my mind is good, if I have to corret something, some little tips on how to do this work or maybe even a tutorial that you think is the best to follow!
Thank you everyone!

Oh here we go... lurker[1].gif
post #10433 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Oh here we go... lurker[1].gif

 

D-do I have to worry? :uhoh:

Forgive my noob-ness ahahah, I'm still a young boy with his first pair of leather shoes and a lot to learn :rotflmao: 

post #10434 of 19058
Don't put rubber soles over your leather soles. Just have the cobbler put toe taps on them. The simplest method of polishing is to get some shoe cream from GlenKaren as well as high shine paste from the same place. Put the cream everywhere except the toe and heel and use the high shine on the toe and heel. Get a horsehair brush to buff quickly, but lightly to a shine. That's all you really need. You don't have to do this all that often either. Never use soap on your shoes.
post #10435 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Don't put rubber soles over your leather soles. Just have the cobbler put toe taps on them. The simplest method of polishing is to get some shoe cream from GlenKaren as well as high shine paste from the same place. Put the cream everywhere except the toe and heel and use the high shine on the toe and heel. Get a horsehair brush to buff quickly, but lightly to a shine. That's all you really need. You don't have to do this all that often either. Never use soap on your shoes.

 

Thank you for your advice :)

Can I ask you why I shouldn't put protective soles? I've seen some pics of leather protective soles instead of the rubber ones, would it be better this way?

By the way I'll ask the cobbler about the toe taps, I hope he can put them on even if my boots already have the toe section of the sole reinforced with some nails :/

post #10436 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

If you wear them in the salt, let them dry on their sides and then use a vinegar solution. Honestly the dilution probably won't matter. Rub them good to get the stains off, let dry then condition. The vinegar is much less drying that the salt.

Think about the tanning process they use chrome salts (generally) to render the fat out of the hide and then sulfuric acid and water solutions to shift the pH back down again. You're essentially rendering all of the fat out of the already tanned leather.

As for your balsamic vinegar question: no. You will only smell more like a salad and probably stain your soles.

That makes sense, thanks. It still kind of blows my mind how much the tannage of leather can still be affected even after it's made up as shoes.

 

And I was, of course, kidding about the balsamic vinegar. I have hippie friends who swear by apple cider vinegar as a cure-all, but I won't be trying that either.

post #10437 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlChI View Post

Thank you for your advice smile.gif
Can I ask you why I shouldn't put protective soles? I've seen some pics of leather protective soles instead of the rubber ones, would it be better this way?
By the way I'll ask the cobbler about the toe taps, I hope he can put them on even if my boots already have the toe section of the sole reinforced with some nails :/

Because if you put rubber protective soles over your shoes the terrorists have won. That's why. Yes, put on toe taps.
Quote:
Originally Posted by YRR92 View Post

That makes sense, thanks. It still kind of blows my mind how much the tannage of leather can still be affected even after it's made up as shoes.

And I was, of course, kidding about the balsamic vinegar. I have hippie friends who swear by apple cider vinegar as a cure-all, but I won't be trying that either.

It is pretty amazing and often unthought about in terms of shoe care.
post #10438 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Because if you put rubber protective soles over your shoes the terrorists have won. That's why. Yes, put on toe taps.

post #10439 of 19058

AlChal,

 

From what I can see on the internet, your Saint Laurent Paris chelsea boots are far from being 'just designer shoes'. They appear to be hugely expensive!  Do take Patrick's advice. Enjoy your shoes - I bet they look really good! :)

 

Best wishes,

Munky


Edited by Munky - 8/26/14 at 7:34am
post #10440 of 19058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

AlChal,

From what I can see on the internet, your Saint Laurent Paris chelsea boots are far from being 'just designer shoes'. They appear to be hugely expensive!

Yeah, but possibly for no good reason.
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