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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 693

post #10381 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by jssdc View Post

Yeah I get that it's normal for the channel cover to peel - I was just looking to see if others has seen peeling in the same time frame. Maybe I'm OCD that I wanted to glue it back, although I'm not particularly so when it comes to other aspects of shoe care

Have Nick send you a small tube of Barge All-Purpose cement. As soon as you see the channel coming up squeeze a little Barge in there, coating both sides of the "flap" and let the cement dry/cure about 15 minutes. Press the two surfaces together and if you can hammer the cemented area. Don't walk or wear them for 24 hours, esp. in hot weather. The glued area should be waterproof but the cement is not invincible. It will either come loose again some weeks or months down the line or it will wear away with the leather.
post #10382 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatandtricycle View Post

Hello, quite new here so apologies if this has been covered. I have a problem where by I seem to be wearing through the vamp lining of shoes quicker than any other part.
Any thoughts or suggestions to prevent or reduce this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


There is a possibility that you're wearing shoes that just don't fit your feet well and so you're getting quite a lot of rubbing in a particular area, which is leading to excessive wear at that point.

It can happen even with leather linings. Journeyman is right...it probaly all comes down to fit. Your toes should just barely be able to reach out and touch the inner walls of the shoe they should not be crowded. When you walk the foot will shift forward and if the toes are touching when you're standing in the shoe, they'll probably rub during gait.

Keep your toenails trimmed.
post #10383 of 19072
A blind stitch covers the out-sole stitching. It has nothing to do with the stitching that connects the in-seam to the welt.
post #10384 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

A blind stitch covers the out-sole stitching. It has nothing to do with the stitching that connects the in-seam to the welt.

Sorry...after nearly ten hours of looking at it, curiosity got the better of me...

What does this mean??

puzzled.gif
post #10385 of 19072

If I could afford a pair of C&J's and had to get the glue pot out, I would be trotting down Jermyn Street with a baseball bat. 

post #10386 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

If I could afford a pair of C&J's and had to get the glue pot out, I would be trotting down Jermyn Street with a baseball bat. 

There are really three variations of outsole channel--only one doesn't need to be glued down during the final stages of making.

The horizontal channel--a cut is made, beginning at the very edge of the outsole, parallel to the surface creating a wide, thin, "flap" which is then rolled back out of the way. The outsole is sewn and the channel cover/flap is laid back over the threads and cemented or glued. The "flap" can be cut by hand but is most often seen in manufactories where it is done by a machine. The channel is invisible when done and the outsole can be finished such that no evidence of stitching is apparent. But because the channel cover is thin, even with the best of cements the probability is high that the outsole will ended looking pretty ragged after only a relatively short time being worn.

The angled channel--a cut is made, beginning at the edge of the outsole or even somewhat inward, that slants severely toward the insole. this "flap" is then rolled back out of the way and the outsole is stitched. The flap is then rolled and burnished back into place over the stitching and pasted or cemented down. This cut is usually made by hand and is almost the hallmark of bespoke work. Again, the finished results look terrific and if the channel begins at the edge of the outsole, it will be invisible. The potential for the flap to wear away and present an unsightly ragged appearance is greatly diminished in this method.

The vertical channel--cut directly perpendicular to the grain surface of the outsole. This can be done by hand but it has almost become synonymous with machines stitched outsoles. Can be closed up tightly but not invisibly. Does not need to be glued.

All three methods will protect the stitches to one degree or another. The horizontal method the least.

Outsoles can also be sewn into a groove or even "aloft" but neither will protect the stitching much .

--
post #10387 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


There are really three variations of outsole channel--only one doesn't need to be glued down during the final stages of making.

The horizontal channel--a cut is made, beginning at the very edge of the outsole, parallel to the surface creating a wide, thin, "flap" which is then rolled back out of the way. The outsole is sewn and the channel cover/flap is laid back over the threads and cemented or glued. The "flap" can be cut by hand but is most often seen in manufactories where it is done by a machine. The channel is invisible when done and the outsole can be finished such that no evidence of stitching is apparent. But because the channel cover is thin, even with the best of cements the probability is high that the outsole will ended looking pretty ragged after only a relatively short time being worn.

The angled channel--a cut is made, beginning at the edge of the outsole or even somewhat inward, that slants severely toward the insole. this "flap" is then rolled back out of the way and the outsole is stitched. The flap is then rolled and burnished back into place over the stitching and pasted or cemented down. This cut is usually made by hand and is almost the hallmark of bespoke work. Again, the finished results look terrific and if the channel begins at the edge of the outsole, it will be invisible. The potential for the flap to wear away and present an unsightly ragged appearance is greatly diminished in this method.

The vertical channel--cut directly perpendicular to the grain surface of the outsole. This can be done by hand but it has almost become synonymous with machines stitched outsoles. Can be closed up tightly but not invisibly. Does not need to be glued.

All three methods will protect the stitches to one degree or another. The horizontal method the least.

Outsoles can also be sewn into a groove or even "aloft" but neither will protect the stitching much .

--

Is it possible to visually distinguish the first two options? Any pics of the two, if it is distinguishable to non-artisans?

post #10388 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

Is it possible to visually distinguish the first two options? Any pics of the two, if it is distinguishable to non-artisans?

Not really. If the angled channel is begun slightly inward from the edge of the outsole it might be visible and an indication that it is indeed an angled channel. I do a angled channel and start my cut on the edge of the outsole...actually a mm +/- down from the grain surface...so it all gets subsumed into the edge finishing. But it makes the flap harder to turn back.

I don't keep track of who does what method so almost the only way to know is probably ask the manufacturer or talk to people who own the brand that you're interested in. Find out what their sole looked like after oh, say, 10-20 wears, etc..That's not foolproof either, though--some will notice, some won't...and some topy over it, for that very reason (among others).

--
post #10389 of 19072
The perpendicular method is what my St. Crispins use. Even wearing a hole in the sole the stitches were never exposed.
post #10390 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The perpendicular method is what my St. Crispins use. Even wearing a hole in the sole the stitches were never exposed.

+1 Probably a pretty common experience.
post #10391 of 19072
Gave a pair of shoes from my GF some TLC. She inherited these from her grandmother, from a good Dutch shoe store. They're post 1960.

I used some renovateur, 1 layer of creme and light waxing. Heavy waxing on the toes to get rid of some nasty scuffs.








post #10392 of 19072
Let's see what they look like on you.
post #10393 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Let's see what they look like on you.

Viewer beware!

Unfortunately they're too small for my GF...and for me.
post #10394 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Sorry...after nearly ten hours of looking at it, curiosity got the better of me...

What does this mean??

puzzled.gif

Maybe he meant blind welt stitch? Where the welt stitching is hidden in a channel on the welt?
post #10395 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Maybe he meant blind welt stitch? Where the welt stitching is hidden in a channel on the welt?

But how could it "cover" the "outsole stitching" if it is the outsole stitching? And who or what was he responding to?
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