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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 688

post #10306 of 19067

Apparently, either can be used. An awful thought. Neither is  in regular use in Wales. Neither, I am sure, apply to pB. :satisfied: 

post #10307 of 19067
I'm a funny looking guy. Kind of like Charlie Sheen had a baby with Kyle Maclachlan.
post #10308 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I'm a funny looking guy. Kind of like Charlie Sheen had a baby with Kyle Maclachlan.

Must be nice to look like movie stars...I'm a short version of Ichabod Crane crossed with Scrooge MacDuck.

If pB can change his avatar so can I...only worse luck, that's the real me.

--
Edited by DWFII - 8/13/14 at 5:04pm
post #10309 of 19067
Does anyone dis-infect their shoes as part of their shoe care regimen? I'm asking as I came across this here.
Quote:
Smith's shine

Shoes are cleaned and moisturised thoroughly, allowing the leather to breathe between each layer of leather cream. Shoes are then left to sit for at least 12 hours with the moisturiser before the signature shine—insides of the shoes are disinfected alongside heels and edges retouched with creams and waxes.
Whisky shine

Shoes are cleaned and moisturised thoroughly with the insides of the shoes disinfected with our in-house selection of premium whisky concoction. Shoes are then left to sit for at least 12 hours with the moisturiser before the shine—uppers are polished with the unique concoction that leaves your shoes with a sweet whisky aroma.
post #10310 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd I/O View Post

Does anyone dis-infect their shoes as part of their shoe care regimen? I'm asking as I came across this here.

[chuckle] Are you sharing your shoes with someone else? Seriously, why would you need to be protected against your own flora and fauna?

As far as a "whisky shine" ...aside from possibly drying out the leather, the real problem is that it's a waste of good whisky. Now if it were whiskey...maybe...nah that's still sacrilege.

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Edited by DWFII - 8/13/14 at 8:39pm
post #10311 of 19067
There are shoe washing services in Japan. It's probably useful on high humidity parts of the world.
post #10312 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Must be nice to look like movie stars...I'm a short version of Ichabod Crane crossed with Scrooge MacDuck.

If pB can change his avatar so can I...only worse luck, that's the real me.

--

You're handsome. You have awesome hair here:

D._W._Frommer_II_interview_at_Keikari_dot_com02.jpg
post #10313 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You're handsome. You have awesome hair here:

Pshaw! You're just schmoozing me. But thanks for the kindness.

That's was taken...must be 15-20 years ago. I was just beginning to develop jowls. My facial hair turned white when I was about 30--it was odd looking when that photo was shot. Nowadays my head hair is more salt than pepper so I'm a little more balanced. That said, at 68+, I still have most of it--the head hair I mean.

I had a pretty little student from Denmark about five years ago and whenever I say something like "I'm old enough to have learned that lesson," she'd pipe up "but younger looking." Quite turned my head. shog[1].gif
post #10314 of 19067
Ha! My father looks way older than he is. I think I look like a baby. I was looking at my work ID card from 6 years ago. Don't look a day older.
post #10315 of 19067

Nothing.


Edited by Munky - 8/14/14 at 12:23pm
post #10316 of 19067

I know that I am a bit slow, but I would really love to understand the Goodyear welting system. I have pored over obscure diagrams, read all about it but nothing seems to be sinking in. A fee of £2.50 will be paid to anyone who can illustrate what this is all about, in very simple terms. The fee will be paid, two years, from next Wednesday. Conditions apply. 

Kind Regards,

Munky

post #10317 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I know that I am a bit slow, but I would really love to understand the Goodyear welting system. I have pored over obscure diagrams, read all about it but nothing seems to be sinking in. A fee of £2.50 will be paid to anyone who can illustrate what this is all about, in very simple terms. The fee will be paid, two years, from next Wednesday. Conditions apply. 
Kind Regards,
Munky

Free of charge...hope it helps.

Basically, it works like this. The gemming has cement on the bottom edge. It is manufactured like that. It is applied, from a big roll, to the insole (which may or may not be leather) by a machine which simultaneously heat re-activates the cement. There is a "past due date" for the cement, however, and sometimes even heat reactivation is problematic.

A machine lasts the lining and the upper over the last. Another machine comes along simultaneously feeding the welt (from a big roll) and stitching it to the gemming with a chain stitch. The thread is fed through a wax pot that contains a thin, non-tacky, liquid wax, functioning more as a thread lubricant than as a sealing and securing medium. A cork filling is applied to fill the gap between the insole and the top of the gemming thus leveling everything out..




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Edited by DWFII - 8/15/14 at 12:55pm
post #10318 of 19067

Thanks, DWF!

post #10319 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Thanks, DWF!

Yr. Hmb. Svt.

cheers.gif

(help at all?)
post #10320 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Free of charge...hope it helps.

Basically, it works like this. The gemming has cement on the bottom edge. It is manufactured like that. It is applied, from a big roll, to the insole (which may or may not be leather) by a machine which simultaneously heat re-activates the cement. There is a "past due date" for the cement, however, and sometimes even heat reactivation is problematic.

A machine lasts the lining and the upper over the last. Another machine comes along simultaneously feeding the welt (from a big roll) and stitching it to the gemming with a chain stitch. The thread is fed through a wax pot that contains a thin, non-tacky, liquid wax, functioning more as a thread lubricant than as a sealing and securing medium. A cork filling is applied to fill the gap between the insole and the top of the gemming thus leveling everything out..




--

 

Very good information. Thank you for this. Just one more question (likely rudimentary). So at this stage, then the outsole/midsole would be sewn onto the shoe by stitching through the welt?

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