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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 680

post #10186 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by LIMBERLION View Post

Where do you guys buy your shoe care stuff? I need to buy a deer bone and some saphir products but my local cobbler carries neither of these. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

No magic in a deer bone. A spoon would work as well. But if you're determined to use a bone, here's what you do:

Go down to you local butcher. Ask for a beef leg bone..."for your dog".... Hang it is the sun for a couple of days--the yellow jackets will strip the meat.

Saw it lengthwise. Don't try to break it--it will spiral fracture. Scrape, file, and sand it ( I run up to 5000 grit Abralon) to shape and smoothness. Polish with white tripoli or even Bon Ami.

Better than any deer bone.
post #10187 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

No magic in a deer bone. A spoon would work as well. But if you're determined to use a bone, here's what you do:

Go down to you local butcher. Ask for a beef leg bone..."for your dog".... Hang it is the sun for a couple of days--the yellow jackets will strip the meat.

Saw it lengthwise. Don't try to break it--it will spiral fracture. Scrape, file, and sand it ( I run up to 5000 grit Abralon) to shape and smoothness. Polish with white tripoli or even Bon Ami.

Better than any deer bone.

Helpful advice DWFII
post #10188 of 10200

Or....just use a good horsehair brush...

 

cause bones don't do anything except scratch your shoes

post #10189 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by LIMBERLION View Post
 

Where do you guys buy your shoe care stuff? I need to buy a deer bone and some saphir products but my local cobbler carries neither of these. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Exquisite Trimmings has the best pricing for saphir and a deer bone.  Much cheaper than any other place.  Shipping to US is reasonable, and VAT is taken off when choosing int shipping option.

post #10190 of 10200

^^ Also a really great guy to deal with, and always ready to cut a special deal to a regular/SF buddy, especially if you're buying a few different things or e.g. a mix of full and sale price stuff.  Worth an email or PM; I can't say enough nice things about this guy.

post #10191 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post

Or....just use a good horsehair brush...

cause bones don't do anything except scratch your shoes

The bone has to be polished. In fact, at one time most shoemakers' hand tools were made of bones--hand tools were called St. Hugh's Bones for a long time...maybe well into the 18th or 19th century...long after most hand tools were being made of iron or steel.

A bone can press and smooth down scratches and it will burnish leather (I use one all the time on heel stacks and bottoms)... however, it's not a substitute for a good brush by any means.They do different things.
post #10192 of 10200

does anyone know a good cobbler in london who can do flushed toe taps/plates and is open on weekends? i have found a few but would rather follow the recommendation of knowledgeable people like your fine selves :)

post #10193 of 10200

Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but a while ago i had a pair of Jeffery West shoes that had quite a high/Stacked heel and they left me with pain in my ankles when i stood still. This has put me off getting shoes with moderately 'high heels' but i would love to get my self some 'John Lobbs Prestige', problem is they have slightly higher heels than most shoes. Does anyone have experience with this form of ankle pain?

post #10194 of 10200
Nope
post #10195 of 10200
So what is the difference between the saphir suede renovateur and the Saphir leather invulner? I have a pair of carmina suede boots from a MTO on danite soles that I plan to wear this winter. Which would be best for keeping them cleanish and as protected from the elements as possible?

To clarify, I will be on a college campus, and as such I will be only walking through snow that has been plowed previously. Maybe a few snow drifts of 2-3ft for these boots.

Thank you.
post #10196 of 10200
Invulner is best suited for new shoes or clean and well kept shoes that merely need a waterproofing spray coat. I think of the suede Renovateur as providing a moisturizing and rejuvenating treatment that spruces up worn shoes after they have been knocked around and then thoroughly cleaned. I believe the suede Reno has walnut oil to revive the plush look and feel of older suede; also it comes in colors, e.g. black, brown, neutral, which will add some dye (except neutral) to worn or scuffed suede,

I would start with Invulner on your clean and/or new shoes, and stick with that until they need more of a reconditioning of dry/worn suede. Since you plan to wear the suede outdoors, subjecting them to the cold, wet, and salty environments of winter, you will probably need the suede Reno by the end of the season at the latest. The suede Reno is meant for occasional maintenance that also provides water resistant protection, like the Invulner. Both are great products. I used both the Invulner and Suede Reno (neutral) this past weekend on new and old shoes, respectively. Best of luck.
post #10197 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by OREO View Post

Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but a while ago i had a pair of Jeffery West shoes that had quite a high/Stacked heel and they left me with pain in my ankles when i stood still. This has put me off getting shoes with moderately 'high heels' but i would love to get my self some 'John Lobbs Prestige', problem is they have slightly higher heels than most shoes. Does anyone have experience with this form of ankle pain?

Maybe your feet just need to get used to them, or a muscle needs to strengthen? Try only wearing them once a week or so and see what happens. If after a while flip them. Lobbs always sell, albeit at a depreciated value.
post #10198 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Invulner is best suited for new shoes or clean and well kept shoes that merely need a waterproofing spray coat. I think of the suede Renovateur as providing a moisturizing and rejuvenating treatment that spruces up worn shoes after they have been knocked around and then thoroughly cleaned. I believe the suede Reno has walnut oil to revive the plush look and feel of older suede; also it comes in colors, e.g. black, brown, neutral, which will add some dye (except neutral) to worn or scuffed suede,

I would start with Invulner on your clean and/or new shoes, and stick with that until they need more of a reconditioning of dry/worn suede. Since you plan to wear the suede outdoors, subjecting them to the cold, wet, and salty environments of winter, you will probably need the suede Reno by the end of the season at the latest. The suede Reno is meant for occasional maintenance that also provides water resistant protection, like the Invulner. Both are great products. I used both the Invulner and Suede Reno (neutral) this past weekend on new and old shoes, respectively. Best of luck.
Thanks man! I will grab a bottle of the invulner.
Also, should I do something to clean the kiwi suede stuff off of my suede chukkas? Maybe I should grab both of them and use the reno on the suede I have now and then the invulner after I reno them.

I have a new pair of suede boots coming for the winter. I have renomat and renovateur currently.
post #10199 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Maybe your feet just need to get used to them, or a muscle needs to strengthen? Try only wearing them once a week or so and see what happens. If after a while flip them. Lobbs always sell, albeit at a depreciated value.


I think this is what i am going to do. In the end of the day Jeffery West lasts are more fashion orientated than functional. So i am going to consider the problem as a one off.

post #10200 of 10200
Quote:
Originally Posted by OREO View Post


I think this is what i am going to do. In the end of the day Jeffery West lasts are more fashion orientated than functional. So i am going to consider the problem as a one off.

You do well, quite right nod[1].gif
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