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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 678

post #10156 of 19038

quick questions that i didn't think warranted its own thread:

1. am i correct that, if i use saddle soap on a leather product, i should apply some sort of conditioner/oil/balm on it afterward to replenish the oils? i understand that most saddle soaps have some sort of conditioning agent in it, but it seems like applying some sort of conditioner afterwards wouldn't hurt.

 

2. i have a natural leather wallet that looks kinda gross because the indigo from my raw denim rubbed all over it. what's the best way to address this?

 

thanks guys

post #10157 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


As long as heel height doesn't change...from the way the shoe was originally built...no harm, no foul.

 

In fact, some bespoke shops and repair shops in Japan do it  for a lowly price of a few hundred yens!

 

 

p.s., do you know the best way to soften heel stiffeners?

post #10158 of 19038

Ideas for best way to clean/polish Deer Skin? 

post #10159 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count de Monet View Post

I posed the identical question a couple of weeks ago and received no response. That, in and of itself, might answer the question: no, there is no consensus, at least none I can devine from pouring over most of the 10,000+ posts in this thread.

Except, I think there is almost universal agreement that one should keep the shoes free of damaging grit with regular wiping down and brushing. Like chicken soup, it can't hurt.

And no doubt you're aware that, as with calf, whatever "product" you employ is best used in moderation.

But as far as actual "conditioning," I see no evidence of consensus. Some love Reno on shell while others wonder if it actually contributes to drying. And there are those who doubt that cordovan, as dense as it's surface is, can absorb much of anything anyway.

If on my deathbed it is finally revealed to me that shell is infused with all the natural conditioning it will ever need when you bring it home from the store as long as you never mess it up, I won't be shocked.

Having said all that, I guess my 3 newish pair are about 97% "Mac Method" and 3% Reno. My Carter Administration-era Imperials got tuned up Nick V. last year with both VSC and Reno, and my early 80's Hanover PRB's were greatly improved in appearance by me applying some burgundy AE shell conditioner. So I'm all over the place.. They all look good but I'm not sure it is because of what I do or in spite of what I do.

I would use saphir cordovan cream for conditioning. VSC has petroleum distillates in it, which isn't great for leather. If you want a high shine, bull them with wax like you would calf, that's what I do. Also, Alden's have that "high-shine" because they put a shellac on them during the finishing process.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman Spliff View Post

quick questions that i didn't think warranted its own thread:
1. am i correct that, if i use saddle soap on a leather product, i should apply some sort of conditioner/oil/balm on it afterward to replenish the oils? i understand that most saddle soaps have some sort of conditioning agent in it, but it seems like applying some sort of conditioner afterwards wouldn't hurt.

2. i have a natural leather wallet that looks kinda gross because the indigo from my raw denim rubbed all over it. what's the best way to address this?

thanks guys

Don't use saddle soap on leather, it has a very high pH relative to the leather fibers (~3 - 5). For cleaning the indigo stains off of the wallet try Renomat.
post #10160 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post
 

Hankering for pictures of well worn shells.  Any chance of a few snaps? 

post #10161 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

p.s., do you know the best way to soften heel stiffeners?

Of course, it depends on what the heel stiffener is made of. Many manufactured shoes use a resin impregnated fiber mat called "celastic." You're not going to soften that no matter what you do...short of destroying your shoes.

Other makers use paper or leatherboard. You soften it at your own peril...like softening particleboard.

If the heel stiffener is made of leather, you could try softening it by infusing warm water from the inside of the shoe. Get it too wet, however, and you'll end up with water stains on the outside of the shoe.

A good leather heel stiffener will acquire some flexibility and/or softness with wear, and over time. But in truth, heel stiffeners are not meant to soften--their purpose is to "stiffen." Funny how that works. cool.gif

I've seen...and worn...vintage shoes that had heel stiffeners that were literally hard as a rock. No problem. And some old finders catalogues offered pre-cut heel stiffeners that are touted as being extra hard.

You may feel that the stiffener needs softening because it is chafing or hurting your foot. But the last is most likely the culprit there. Or fit. Or even poor patterning.
post #10162 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Of course, it depends on what the heel stiffener is made of. Many manufactured shoes use a resin impregnated fiber mat called "celastic." You're not going to soften that no matter what you do...short of destroying your shoes.

Other makers use paper or leatherboard. You soften it at your own peril...like softening particleboard.

If the heel stiffener is made of leather, you could try softening it by infusing warm water from the inside of the shoe. Get it too wet, however, and you'll end up with water stains on the outside of the shoe.

A good leather heel stiffener will acquire some flexibility and/or softness with wear, and over time. But in truth, heel stiffeners are not meant to soften--their purpose is to "stiffen." Funny how that works. cool.gif

I've seen...and worn...vintage shoes that had heel stiffeners that were literally hard as a rock. No problem. And some old finders catalogues offered pre-cut heel stiffeners that are touted as being extra hard.

You may feel that the stiffener needs softening because it is chafing or hurting your foot. But the last is most likely the culprit there. Or fit. Or even poor patterning.

 

It would be an easy problem to solve if its just improper fit.

 

I have a problem where I have a lump bone chip at my right heel thats not outright visible and hard to measure/trace; it clearly there on x-rays.  I have a pair of boots that sometimes aggravate the lump after a few hours of walking and I sometimes get blisters.

 

I am suspecting a poor patterning/skiving job, but will play around with knocking the heel stiffener softer.  It's most probably celastic. 

post #10163 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

It would be an easy problem to solve if its just improper fit.

I have a problem where I have a lump bone chip at my right heel thats not outright visible and hard to measure/trace; it clearly there on x-rays.  I have a pair of boots that sometimes aggravate the lump after a few hours of walking and I sometimes get blisters.

I am suspecting a poor patterning/skiving job, but will play around with knocking the heel stiffener softer.  It's most probably celastic. 

Well, bone spurs on the heel are quite common problems that bespoke or MTO can, and do, address.

If the last is too straight at the back of the heel...and I've seen more than a few like that, right here on SF...it may exacerbate the problem, as well.
post #10164 of 19038
Deleted.
Edited by smoothie1 - 7/16/14 at 11:35am
post #10165 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Think about this a little--think about the surfaces and the conditions that a "natural" foot has to adapt to. Think about the way in which muscles and ligaments are taxed...and strengthened...when the foot has to accommodate an uneven surface. How can a "flat sole and floppy upper" allow the foot to move like it was intended to?!


The foot in a shoe is like a couch potato...and the softer the couch, the more insulated from real life and activity, the less fit it is. When age begins to take its toll, it is unlikely that this couch potato will be able to function efficiently or meet the demands that are placed upon it, without a lot of whining.


The insole is everything...it is the backbone of a well made shoe..structurally as well as physiologically. It provides the protection and the support. It "sets" length and width. It controls shape. Fundamentally, the upper is mostly a means to secure the insole to the bottom of the foot.


Any kind of outsole short of thin rawhide next to a bare foot, is going to constrain the foot and prevent it from functioning as it was designed to do.


Your illustration...or the company...would be better off making the sole thin and flexible (and floppy) and the upper however they wanted.


But only if they are really interested in the "natural" health of the foot.


--

I have purchased some of Allen Edmonds ortho inserts to help with fit on a few pairs of shoes - feet just enough different size to make proper sizing a problem on certain shoes. I actually like the feel so much of the AE insert is there a reason I should not size new purchases for the anticipation of putting these in? I would be buying a pair for each shoe not swapping them in and out.

Just curious.

Here is a picture of it in the shoe and the shoe without it
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

What size insert did you get and for what size leeds?
post #10166 of 19038
Can someone please point me to the page that contains tutorials, photos, etc?

I just bought a pair of Allen Edmonds 4-5 months ago and have been wearing them indoors only.... came to work one morning and saw a giant scuff on one side, around 4-5 inches long frown.gif.

I'd be pretty bummed out if it cannot be fixed.
post #10167 of 19038
Post pics.
post #10168 of 19038
Most things can be fixed, or concealed pretty well. It is probably nothing to worry about.
post #10169 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by lektrix View Post

Can someone please point me to the page that contains tutorials, photos, etc?

I just bought a pair of Allen Edmonds 4-5 months ago and have been wearing them indoors only.... came to work one morning and saw a giant scuff on one side, around 4-5 inches long frown.gif.

I'd be pretty bummed out if it cannot be fixed.

First, have you been polishing? A layer of polish provides protection against scuffs, so you should be doing that.

Generally it comes down to just buffing and re-polishing, and possibly filling in scratches with wax.
post #10170 of 19038
Cross post from Carmina:

I did my research and read about the "Carmina squeak", but didn't find a solution. I have a few pairs, but only one right shoe makes a terrible squeak/creak when I walk. It is embarrassing. The issue is in the footbed and does not occur when I bend the shoes in my hand. With the shoes on, it starts immediately as my heel lifts from the ground. It also make the noise if I just rub my toes in the sole. It almost sounds like a damn duck quack. I'd appreciate any help I can get. Forgive me if I didn't use the correct terms when trying to describe where the sound is coming from.
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