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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 673

post #10081 of 12489
Good points by DW and PB.
I noticed something many years ago. Guys will often tell me "these are the most comfortable shoes I ever owned. Do what ever it takes".
It's very, very rare that I hear a Woman say that. Why? Because they buy for style and color. Comfort and fit are low on their priority list.
Often a Woman (usually mid-late 30ish) will complain to me my "shoes are killing me". I think my foot changed shape.
I take her (normally high stiletto) shoe put it on the floor and tell her put her bare foot next to that shoe and compare shapes.
One is the one that God created the other is what a designer created and convinced her to wear. Of course she is going to have discomfort putting that foot in that shoe. It's usually at that point where she starts to become more concerned about fit and comfort.
By that time the damage is done.
post #10082 of 12489
I'm curious for a too-long shoe, what is the better option a tongue pad, or heel pad? Which is the lesser of the evils?
post #10083 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I'm curious for a too-long shoe, what is the better option a tongue pad, or heel pad? Which is the lesser of the evils?

The real question is "which is the lesser of two weevils?" The smaller one, obviously...or maybe not. It's a conundrum.

Similarly...

Anything that displaces the foot, and esp. the heel to ball measurement, such that it isn't in its proper place relative to the last and the way the last was designed is going to cause long term distortion of the foot. The tongue pad isn't going to cause any additional damage that the "too-long' shoe isn't already causing. It's no different than stuffing kleenex in your bra...or potatoes in your jock strap.
post #10084 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Without additional information, it is difficult to comment with any certainty or confidence, but I suspect that feet like that are the result of a lifetime of mis-fits. Or poorly constructed shoes.

It could be a birth defect or a genetic abnormality, of course. But feet that deform easily are themselves the result of genetic abnormalities or weaknesses.

For example, women develop all kinds of foot deformities from wearing high heeled shoes--shoes that don't properly support the waist/arch of the foot or respect the foot's structure and function which, ultimately, is the even distribution of body weight during walking and in all kinds of terrain. High heeled shoes universally change and distort the foot's ability to fulfill its function...often irreversibly.

What most people don't realize is that this kind of damage takes place over years and years--like the foundations of a tall building that has been built on shifting sands or to specifications that just can't support the weight (think medieval cathedrals) --eventually you start seeing cracks and other deformities.

Similarly....

--

That is actually my foot. You mentioned the condition a little higher on the same page; pes cavus. It runs in my family. My feet flatten out somewhat when I'm standing, but the height and girth of my forefoot does make it difficult to find shoes that fit well enough

post #10085 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

That is actually my foot. You mentioned the condition a little higher on the same page; pes cavus. It runs in my family. My feet flatten out somewhat when I'm standing, but the height and girth of my forefoot does make it difficult to find shoes that fit well enough

I wondered but I am more used to identifying pes cavus from the footprint. Also, your first (the big toe) is sprung way high--that's not, AFAIK, automatically associated with pes cavus.
post #10086 of 12489

Toes bent up and clawed is common with pes cavus. You may not notice it so much when the foot is bearing weight. The photo was taken sitting down with my feet out in front of me with my feet in a neutral position for that posture, and the photo rotated through 90 degrees. That angle dramatises the position of the toes.

post #10087 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

Toes bent up and clawed is common with pes cavus. You may not notice it so much when the foot is bearing weight. The photo was taken sitting down with my feet out in front of me with my feet in a neutral position for that posture, and the photo rotated through 90 degrees. That angle dramatises the position of the toes.

From what I know (not all that much in this regard), hammer toes and clawed toes while not necessarily symptomatic are surely a possible symptom. I guess I never thought of the type of formation in the photo as being "clawed." "Clawed" speaks to me as being like a claw--curved downward, maybe more like hammer toes.

That said, I am not a doctor, I do not have the condition myself and, in accordance with Oregon law, I don't do orthopedic work., so I readily defer to your experience and knowledge. When I do...rarely...see indication of pes cavus it is generally just a slight gap in the footprint along the lateral waist/arch.
post #10088 of 12489

I couldn't call myself an expert, just the owner of such fine feet. By clawed I mean the toes are bent up, with the more distal joints being bent down which is the posture my toes take when standing.

 

There are a number of different forms of pes cavus. I suspect we are discussing different forms; purely high arches, vs. high arches with varus deformity (the foot rotated inwards), and the associated toe deformity.

 

A gap in the footprint suggests a more neutral stance. I supinate, walking more on the outside edges of my feet, so my foot remains in contact along the outside edge.

post #10089 of 12489
A cobbler just told me to not use Lexol on leather soles because it will soak through and loosen the "glue" and stitching. Hmm.
post #10090 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacafotos View Post

A cobbler just told me to not use Lexol on leather soles because it will soak through and loosen the "glue" and stitching. Hmm.

Nonsense
post #10091 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

I couldn't call myself an expert, just the owner of such fine feet. By clawed I mean the toes are bent up, with the more distal joints being bent down which is the posture my toes take when standing.

There are a number of different forms of pes cavus. I suspect we are discussing different forms; purely high arches, vs. high arches with varus deformity (the foot rotated inwards), and the associated toe deformity.

A gap in the footprint suggests a more neutral stance. I supinate, walking more on the outside edges of my feet, so my foot remains in contact along the outside edge.

I won't do orthoepic adjustments either. The only time I will is with a Dr's prescription. And even with that only simple accommodations.
Heel lifts, bars, basic things of that nature. Anything else is beyond the realm I'm comfortable with.
If there is a podiatrist reading it would be interesting if you weighed in here.
post #10092 of 12489

Thanks for the responses DWF & Nick. I'm not looking for orthopedic advice, I just posted the photo in response to Munky. Despite appearances my feet are functioning well. I know my gait is not ideal, but it works for me.

 

I've had inserts in the past when I've had plantar fasciitis (possibly brought on by poorly constructed shoes), but never liked them. You correct one issue, but create another. I found the solution was to wear either properly constructed shoes, or none at all. Shoes that flex in the wrong places, overly soft running shoes where you're standing on squishy foam with no solid base, gimmicks like air cells, all bad ideas.

 

My biggest problem with shoes is finding ones that will accommodate my forefoot without being loose in the heel.

post #10093 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacafotos View Post

A cobbler just told me to not use Lexol on leather soles because it will soak through and loosen the "glue" and stitching. Hmm.

Well, Lexol does make a neatsfoot oil product--Lexol-nf. I suppose if the shoes were soaked in it (and I've seen people do that) it could affect the adhesive. But as strong as that adhesive is, eventually it breaks down under the use and ultraviolet rays etc.. That's why...no matter what adhesive is used ...sewing the outsole on is always to be preferred over cement sole construction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

Thanks for the responses DWF & Nick. I'm not looking for orthopedic advice, I just posted the photo in response to Munky. Despite appearances my feet are functioning well. I know my gait is not ideal, but it works for me.

I apologize if I came across as offering orthopedic advice--I am not qualified to give orthopedic advice. I guess one always runs that risk when commiserating with others. I have what comes close to being pes planar. But, aside from what I hope is a transitory neuropathy, my feet are healthy and fully functional --with zero pain. Years ago, a podiatrist told me that shape or structure does not indicate a pathology. If feet are functional and not experiencing debilitating discomfort they're more or less normal.
Quote:
I've had inserts in the past when I've had plantar fasciitis (possibly brought on by poorly constructed shoes), but never liked them. You correct one issue, but create another. I found the solution was to wear either properly constructed shoes, or none at all. Shoes that flex in the wrong places, overly soft running shoes where you're standing on squishy foam with no solid base, gimmicks like air cells, all bad ideas.

That's what I was getting at when I commented on heel liners and tongue pads.
Quote:
My biggest problem with shoes is finding ones that will accommodate my forefoot without being loose in the heel.

I would think it could be nigh onto impossible...short of MTO or bespoke.
post #10094 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacafotos View Post

A cobbler just told me to not use Lexol on leather soles because it will soak through and loosen the "glue" and stitching. Hmm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Nonsense

This is interesting. I have always applied Lexol to the lining and insoles of my shoes and I was always careful not to over apply it there in case it seeps under the insole. I was always afraid of the glue that holds the gemming in place becoming loosened from the conditioner. Then again there aren't any solvents in Lexol so I guess it is a non-issue...
post #10095 of 12489
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


This is interesting. I have always applied Lexol to the lining and insoles of my shoes and I was always careful not to over apply it there in case it seeps under the insole. I was always afraid of the glue that holds the gemming in place becoming loosened from the conditioner. Then again there aren't any solvents in Lexol so I guess it is a non-issue...

Ah! But there are solvents in All Purpose cements. When cements and oils mix, the cement always looses--they're natural antagonists. You can't, for instance, use a solvent based adhesive to cement together two pieces of leather if one of them is stuffed.

That said, putting Lexol-brown on your linings and insoles occasionally probably won't affect the construction, but the cement used on gemming is AP. One of the things we value leather for is its permeability. Too much conditioner of any kind...and it would have to be way too much...can penetrate through the insole, esp. if we are talking about thin insoles such as manufacturers use with GY (there was a recent discussion in the EG thread about insole thicknesses that might bear on this point).
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