or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 672

post #10066 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by niakulah View Post


DWF, your comment on making the heel liner thick enough implies that cobblers can custom-make them? That's news to me, as the ones I see sold in stores are not nearly thick enough to be of help. I will ask my cobbler!

Yes, we/I did when I was doing repair regularly. It just depends on the thickness of the leather being added. But any thickness moves the foot forward...again, displacing the joint/treadline of the foot. All these after-the-fact remedies are fundamentally desperate attempts trying to make a bad situation less bad...they cannot correct the problem nor are they entirely benign or physiologically neutral.

They are "cobbled together" solutions, no disrespect intended. Sometimes that's all you got to go with. But the better solution is not to dig yourself into the hole in the first place.

--
Edited by DWFII - 7/8/14 at 7:56pm
post #10067 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Yes, we/I did when I was doing repair regularly. It just depends on the thickness of the leather being added. But any thickness moves the foot forward...again, displacing the joint/treadline of the foot. All these after-the-fact remedies are fundamentally desperate attempts trying to make a bad situation less bad...the cannot correct the problem nor are they entirely benign or physiologically neutral.

They are "cobbled together" solutions, no disrespect intended. Sometimes that's all you got to go with. But the better solution is not to dig yourself into the hole in the first place.

Fair enough but...what does one do when they truly have a difficult foot to fit regardless of the various lasts offered by various RTW makers? I see it quite often. In most cases they can not afford to have there entire rotation custom made.
post #10068 of 12473
With shoe trees, do I want a slightly larger shoe tree or one that can slip as far up the toe box as possible?
post #10069 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Fair enough but...what does one do when they truly have a difficult foot to fit regardless of the various lasts offered by various RTW makers? I see it quite often. In most cases they can not afford to have there entire rotation custom made.

I understand your concern. But let me ask the obvious..."what does one do when they" have diabetes? Or pes cavis? Or a serious chrome allergy? What if they are born with one leg shorter than the other?

Do you throw more sugar at diabetes? Or insulin? Is a crutch a better answer than a shoe that compensates for a short leg?

I'm not making fun or making light of any condition...everyone has their own handicap in one way or the other. A person needs to address that issue as best they can. Sometimes that means that they don't, or can't, have a "rotation." It's my belief that one really good fitting pair of shoes is better than twenty that don't fit. And probably less expensive, esp. in the long run.

It doesn't always have to be bespoke but when everything else falls short the least viable, the least rational, answer is not another misfit with expedient and largely ineffective gimmicks or stop-gap contrivances trying to compensate for fundamentally inappropriate choices.

You can jam a square peg in a round hole but that doesn't make it logical or make it a fit.

The thing is...and I don't mean this as a criticism (of anyone) but rather as a way of looking at things..."the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again...expecting a different result."
post #10070 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I understand your concern. But let me ask the obvious..."what does one do when they" have diabetes? Or pes cavis? Or a serious chrome allergy? What if they are born with one leg shorter than the other?

Do you throw more sugar at diabetes? Or insulin? Is a crutch a better answer than a shoe that compensates for a short leg?

I'm not making fun or making light of any condition...everyone has their own handicap in one way or the other. A person needs to address that issue as best they can. Sometimes that means that they don't, or can't, have a "rotation." It's my belief that one really good fitting pair of shoes is better than twenty that don't fit. And probably less expensive, esp. in the long run.

It doesn't always have to be bespoke but when everything else falls short the least viable, the least rational, answer is not another misfit with expedient and largely ineffective gimmicks or stop-gap contrivances trying to compensate for fundamentally inappropriate choices.



You can jam a square peg in a round hole but that doesn't make it logical or make it a fit.

The thing is...and I don't mean this as a criticism (of anyone) but rather as a way of looking at things..."the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again...expecting a different result."

That's one way of looking at it and practical in most circumstances.
I have a frequent customer that loves to dress up for business. He can't wear any U.S. made shoe because of how there lasts match the configuration of his foot structure. He normally wears E.G.'s. He decided to have a custom made pair of shoes from a top maker in the U.K. When the fitter came to N.Y. He explained the whole process to him. They began taking measurements and sketching his foot. They made 4 pair of mock shoes. Eventually closing the real pair. He still couldn't wear them. They started over. He kept me informed during the process (which took nearly 2 years). Eventually he commented to me that while he was impressed with the treatment and ambition the company had for a proper fit it must have cost them 8K to get those shoes on his feet. I told him in retail terms.....more. In the end he appreciated the efforts and personnel attention of the company but, he still wound up with a pair of shoes that still had some "hot spots". I might add that the maker is very reputable and has been for decades. There least expensive RTW style retails for about $1500.00. All the dimensions that you mention maybe correct in theory but may not apply in every case. Sometimes you have to throw the baby out with the wash water.
In this case the Guy wants/needs at least a nominal rotation to satisfy his business needs. For him the more the better. Should he consider other alternatives?
post #10071 of 12473

But Nick, the case you quote is an 'outlier'. It is hard to imagine that too many other people have the problems that this poor guy had - if any. 

post #10072 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

But Nick, the case you quote is an 'outlier'. It is hard to imagine that too many other people have the problems that this poor guy had - if any. 

No question about that. I chose a severe case to make a point. There are many others that have less severe issues but severe enough that they simply can not get a proper fit from a RTW shoe.
post #10073 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

But Nick, the case you quote is an 'outlier'. It is hard to imagine that too many other people have the problems that this poor guy had - if any. 

 

Believe it or don't, some people are blessed with feet like this.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

post #10074 of 12473
Some people have foot problems that are so severe they can never be comfortable...not in this life. There's just no way around that. The chances are that Nick's customer can have a rotation of 100 pairs of shoes and none of them will feel good as long as he is standing or walking in them.

Since my recent "episode," I have some neuropathy in my feet--creating "hot spots." Otherwise my feet are healthy. The answer is not to buy shoes that don't fit or are deliberately misfit, for one reason or another. Wearing shoes that don't fit can break down the structure of the foot such that additional problems are created which are far more consequential and severe.

Little is gained if you end up with feet that are unhealthy and unable to support your weight properly... and, compounding all that, you still have hot spots.

What profiteth it a man if he gains relief from his hot spots but loses his metatarsal arch?

When a person finds themselves in a hole, the wisest course of action is to stop digging.

--
Edited by DWFII - 7/9/14 at 7:52am
post #10075 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger la Rock View Post

Believe it or don't, some people are blessed with feet like this. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



Without additional information, it is difficult to comment with any certainty or confidence, but I suspect that feet like that are the result of a lifetime of mis-fits. Or poorly constructed shoes.

It could be a birth defect or a genetic abnormality, of course. But feet that deform easily are themselves the result of genetic abnormalities or weaknesses.

For example, women develop all kinds of foot deformities from wearing high heeled shoes--shoes that don't properly support the waist/arch of the foot or respect the foot's structure and function which, ultimately, is the even distribution of body weight during walking and in all kinds of terrain. High heeled shoes universally change and distort the foot's ability to fulfill its function...often irreversibly.

What most people don't realize is that this kind of damage takes place over years and years--like the foundations of a tall building that has been built on shifting sands or to specifications that just can't support the weight (think medieval cathedrals) --eventually you start seeing cracks and other deformities.

Similarly....

--
Edited by DWFII - 7/9/14 at 6:08am
post #10076 of 12473
I think there is two things at play when it comes to wearing RTW shoes, or even bespoke. The first is the customer's tolerance for rubbing, or digging into the foot, or whatever, and second the expectation assumed when going bespoke. Certain people have very low tolerances for any sort of discomfort no matter how minor it may be. If they feel anything, they complain. Essentially they are whiney wusses. I think mostly this is because of our sneaker culture here in America. Somebody having worn sneakers their whole life and they are in search for a dress shoe that shrouds their foot in a plush environment. Their feet have been coddled for decades and thus ruined. I have come across many people who go bespoke and still complain about rubs, or whatnot. The fact is the shoe is made of leather, leather has to bend and move with your foot. You are always going to feel it on your foot. Now, I wore "dress" shoes of sorts very often when I was growing up (I was a little fop even as a child) and I don't think it is coincidental that I prefer a close fitting shoe. Recently I got a pair of sneakers to wear in situations where I would be irresponsible to wear anything else. It bothers me that they feel "big" even in my size. I feel nothing, no support and it is odd to me. I actually feel louche and sloppy in them. I'm a weirdo. Anyways, even if a shoe is rubbing me weird I usually get used to it in no time. Skin gets thicker and then it is perfect, just give it a little time. Also, shoes don't always feel the exact same way each time. These humid days here in New York shoes will rub where they didn't in the spring just do to feet swelling from the humidity. Don't even get me started if I eat Chinese food!
post #10077 of 12473

^^^ Dude your new avatar is freaking me out

post #10078 of 12473

Yes, Patrick, do reconsider your choice of avatar. You must have and older photo of you that is not quite so revolting. :)

post #10079 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Yes, Patrick, do reconsider your choice of avatar. You must have and older photo of you that is not quite so revolting. smile.gif

I don't know, older photos aren't always the answer--I suspect Patrick is about 10 years old in that one. It boggles the imagination to consider what an up-to-date photo might reveal.

crackup[1].gif
post #10080 of 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacafotos View Post

With shoe trees, do I want a slightly larger shoe tree or one that can slip as far up the toe box as possible?

I also would like some advice on this please, I take a size 8.5, so which would be best a shoetree size 8 or size 9?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**