or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 671

post #10051 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I have several computers...I just don't store photos of techniques or finished work on this one. Nevertheless, as requested...

As mentioned, I haven't done this in a while--no call for it. So it took me about 20 minutes to get set up.

Once set up, I made this split storm welt in about 15minutes (click to enlarge):

It's only about 12 inches long but it was for demonstration (proof of concept) not for use--I don't know where I would use it.




Grainside at an angle to show "storm lip."



Storm lip split to 6 iron



Outside/outsole edge split to 6 iron.



Fleshside showing inseam/thread groove (unnecessary)


Interesting.....Thank you for your time.
Just courious, do you do that with a knife -or- are there other hand tools used?
post #10052 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Maybe you already have...I dunno...but if not, don't get into Skyrim. It's an RPG that plays like a FPS. But the real drawback is that it's a huge and graphically spectacular world. Several years ago, when I told my computer tech I was going to start playing Skyrim, he said simply "Goodbye." Really immersive.

I quit playing it about two years ago. But I recently had some fairly major health problems and when I was sitting around recuperating I kept getting images/flashbacks of all the places I'd been in Skyrim. I had to re-load it and start playing again. Even three years after its release it is still one of the most played games for PC.

I have over 300 hours in the game but I run across people on the Skyrim forums that have ten times that much.

Sorry everyone for the OT posts but ...you go where the conversation takes you.

I have played Skyrim, but had to quit as I used way too much time on it.
post #10053 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Interesting.....Thank you for your time.
Just courious, do you do that with a knife -or- are there other hand tools used?

As I said in an earlier post (#10034) on this subject, there are a couple of channeling tools that are well suited to make storm welt.

To make the split storm welt, I used an American Channel Knife (that's the name of the tool). I use the same tool to make the initial "feather" cut on insoles in preparation for hand welting.

The American Channel Knife can also be used for making a horizontal channel in the outsole in preparation for sewing the outsole by hand...although I have another channeler that does the same job better. I don't like a horizontal channel, so I hand cut my outsole channels, at an angle from the very edge of the outsole, with a long handle-less knife ordinarily used for paring...or, more recently, a Japanese skiving/leather knife.
post #10054 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

I have played Skyrim, but had to quit as I used way too much time on it.

I understand completely..

fistbump.gif
post #10055 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I don't think it will crack, probably just softer leather from non-prime areas of the hide. I can't see it being an issue as I don't think that part of the shoe sees much stress.

Thanks PB. FWIW, it's from the Loake Evolution range. I know it's not their top of the line but it's still non-CG and made in England. The leather looks good to my (untrained) eyes.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Understand that it is nigh onto impossible to diagnose shoe or fit problems from a description or even from a photo. All we can do is line out the possibilities.

Chances are real high that the bulging topline is indicative of a poor fit in the long heel measurement. I suspect that you may be experiencing some heel slip as well.

While the creasing on the side is, as pB suggested, relatively insignificant and not posing any real cracking problems, it will probably only get worse..at least for a while.

Spot on DWF! It is a half size too long to accommodate my somewhat freakish wide foot (it's already a G, I might need to find an H!). Unfortunately I can't afford to experiment right now so I'm stuck with these for a while, so it's good to know that you think they won't crack. My last shoes did, but they were a POS that I bought before I started reading SF. Here's a pic:

 

 

Thanks both of you for your help!

post #10056 of 10404

I have just got some Magnanni shoes (courtesy of ebay) that have a darker toe than the rest of the shoe. I've taken the pictures below, but the effect in real life is slightly more marked.

 

How do I polish the shoes to maintain this effect?  Do I just use a polish to suit the lighter colour of brown, and the toe will maintain the darker finish due to its treatment?

 

Apologies if this has already been covered in this thread, my search skills found this thread, but I'm not sure how to seach within a thread.

 

Thanks.

post #10057 of 10404
Yes, that will keep the burnishing. However, if the area is nicked you may have to use darker polish to regain the effect.
post #10058 of 10404

Perfect, thanks for that.

Edward

post #10059 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by niakulah View Post

Spot on DWF! It is a half size too long to accommodate my somewhat freakish wide foot (it's already a G, I might need to find an H!). Unfortunately I can't afford to experiment right now so I'm stuck with these for a while, so it's good to know that you think they won't crack. My last shoes did, but they were a POS that I bought before I started reading SF. Here's a pic:




Thanks both of you for your help!

You may want to try a back liner and/or tongue pad to make up some length.
post #10060 of 10404
A tongue pad would be a neutral remedy...if somewhat "makeshift."

But heel liners, if made thick enough to take up the slack in the topline, will push the foot forward in the shoe...resulting in the treadline being moved forward relative to the last and the proper placement/socketing of the joint in the shoe. And that obviates any advantage to buying a longer size to accommodate a wide forepart as was the OP's initial mistake.

Buying shoes that don't fit in one dimension in order to fit another seldom answers. And makeshift solutions seldom do either--inevitably they are...well, "makeshift."

It's a bad situation all around.

--
Edited by DWFII - 7/8/14 at 7:18am
post #10061 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

A tongue pad would be a neutral remedy...if somewhat "makeshift."

But heel liners, if made thick enough to take up the slack in the topline, will push the foot forward in the shoe...resulting in the treadline being moved forward relative to the last and the proper placement/socketing of the joint in the shoe. And that obviates any advantage to buying a longer size to accommodate a wide forepart as was the OP's initial mistake.

Buying shoes that don't fit in one dimension in order to fit another seldom answers. And makeshift solutions seldom do either--inevitably they are...well, "makeshift."

It's a bad situation all around.

--

I agree anytime a shoe is not fitted properly it's a bad situation. If you use a thin piece of leather suede side out it will help grab the heel and eliminate some of the slipping. We are not talking about a bespoke shoe. The slight room it will take up would not have a noticeable impact on the treadline being moved.
We are coming from different viewpoints here. I'm am focusing on making the shoe more serviceable without doing any damage and you are concentrating on the technical aspects.
I agree again any inserts are for the most part are makeshift but with mass produced shoes and a difficult foot to fit it's pretty much inevitable that some of those devices are useful.
post #10062 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

I agree anytime a shoe is not fitted properly it's a bad situation. If you use a thin piece of leather suede side out it will help grab the heel and eliminate some of the slipping. We are not talking about a bespoke shoe. The slight room it will take up would not have a noticeable impact on the treadline being moved.
We are coming from different viewpoints here. I'm am focusing on making the shoe more serviceable without doing any damage and you are concentrating on the technical aspects.
I agree again any inserts are for the most part are makeshift but with mass produced shoes and a difficult foot to fit it's pretty much inevitable that some of those devices are useful.

You've "got it in one."

Your advice, as far as it goes, is prudent and acceptable (although it doesn't address the loose topline issue) ...and after the fact. Mine is (or tries to be) always before the fact--to lay down a base of knowledge so that such mistakes as buying a shoe a bit longer to accommodate a wide forepart is never an automatic impulse. Or acceptable option.

Nine times out of ten, if people know beforehand what's proper fit, and good leather, and best practices, the shoes they bring to you will be easier to return to their original beauty and a pleasure to work on.
post #10063 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

You've "got it in one."

Your advice, as far as it goes, is prudent and acceptable (although it doesn't address the loose topline issue) ...and after the fact. Mine is (or tries to be) always before the fact--to lay down a base of knowledge so that such mistakes as buying a shoe a bit longer to accommodate a wide forepart is never an automatic impulse. Or acceptable option.

Nine times out of ten, if people know beforehand what's proper fit, and good leather, and best practices, the shoes they bring to you will be easier to return to their original beauty and a pleasure to work on.

In most cases when you use either of the devices mentioned they will tighten up the topline. How much? It varies.
As you know I see some top high-grades on a daily basis. It always blows my mind when a customer brings in a new pair of shoes that cost $1500.00 or more and he has tongue pads slapped in them. Then again there are some with such difficult feet to fit that no RTW shoe will be a proper fit. In those cases it's use the OTC devices to improve the fit/feel or have a pair of shoes custom made.
Not all of them can afford that.
post #10064 of 10404

@niakulah, a shopping tip on Loake if I may: whether you get the Indian-made L1 range or the more expensive ones, the last is everything.  I find the 26 last very generous, and it's widely (no pun intended!) available in G fittings.  It's also a very attractive soft chisel toe that works well as a dress shoe or a casual one.  I have a suede oxford and a tan leather boot on that last.  

 

Grenson is another maker that has generous G-fitted lasts, a bit more expensive considering most of their shoes (the G2 range) are made in India, but I have a pair of their boots and they do the job.  The leather is more likely CG than Loake's and a bit plasticky.  

 

Church's commonly do a "H" fitting, though their lasts are quite elongated to begin with, their calf leather (not the polished one) is very nice and moulds well to the foot when broken in. Herring Shoes have a good selection, and service.  

 

Alternatively, you have good old Allen Edmonds with their massive range of EEE fittings - even in the Shoe Bank.

 

I also have this bad habit of buying shoes half a size up.  I admit it.  I'm weaning myself off it slowly - waiting for some more "proper" sized shoes at the end of the month. :)

post #10065 of 10404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

A tongue pad would be a neutral remedy...if somewhat "makeshift."

But heel liners, if made thick enough to take up the slack in the topline, will push the foot forward in the shoe...resulting in the treadline being moved forward relative to the last and the proper placement/socketing of the joint in the shoe. And that obviates any advantage to buying a longer size to accommodate a wide forepart as was the OP's initial mistake.

Buying shoes that don't fit in one dimension in order to fit another seldom answers. And makeshift solutions seldom do either--inevitably they are...well, "makeshift."

It's a bad situation all around.

--

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post


In most cases when you use either of the devices mentioned they will tighten up the topline. How much? It varies.
As you know I see some top high-grades on a daily basis. It always blows my mind when a customer brings in a new pair of shoes that cost $1500.00 or more and he has tongue pads slapped in them. Then again there are some with such difficult feet to fit that no RTW shoe will be a proper fit. In those cases it's use the OTC devices to improve the fit/feel or have a pair of shoes custom made.
Not all of them can afford that.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

@niakulah, a shopping tip on Loake if I may: whether you get the Indian-made L1 range or the more expensive ones, the last is everything.  I find the 26 last very generous, and it's widely (no pun intended!) available in G fittings.  It's also a very attractive soft chisel toe that works well as a dress shoe or a casual one.  I have a suede oxford and a tan leather boot on that last.  

 

Grenson is another maker that has generous G-fitted lasts, a bit more expensive considering most of their shoes (the G2 range) are made in India, but I have a pair of their boots and they do the job.  The leather is more likely CG than Loake's and a bit plasticky.  

 

Church's commonly do a "H" fitting, though their lasts are quite elongated to begin with, their calf leather (not the polished one) is very nice and moulds well to the foot when broken in. Herring Shoes have a good selection, and service.  

 

Alternatively, you have good old Allen Edmonds with their massive range of EEE fittings - even in the Shoe Bank.

 

I also have this bad habit of buying shoes half a size up.  I admit it.  I'm weaning myself off it slowly - waiting for some more "proper" sized shoes at the end of the month. :)

 

Thanks gents. Good advice all around.

 

DWF, your comment on making the heel liner thick enough implies that cobblers can custom-make them? That's news to me, as the ones I see sold in stores are not nearly thick enough to be of help. I will ask my cobbler!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**