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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 669

post #10021 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostintranslation View Post


Thanks. I'll keep on reading. I've already seen a few guides, but the methods described are all a bit different. I suppose there's no silver bullet to achieving the perfect shine!

One of the guides that I read recommended stripping off the previous wax polish before conditioning and polishing your shoes. If I just polished my shoes a few days ago, is this something that I need to do before I go at it again? Or would you guys recommend only removing the previous polish if a deep cleaning is required?

Sorry I missed this as I was replying to your other post.

 

No, don't strip them, just bull over the top, the shoes will need layers of polish anyway.

post #10022 of 12370

All is not lost!  I rummaged through the back of a cupboard and found a pair of those cedar wood shoe trees with the long 'springs' attached to them. They fit well and are ideal for my purposes.  Sorry if I started another dust-up along the way. 

post #10023 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

All is not lost!  I rummaged through the back of a cupboard and found a pair of those cedar wood shoe trees with the long 'springs' attached to them. They fit well and are ideal for my purposes.  Sorry if I started another dust-up along the way. 


You don't need to apologize...you can't start a "dust up" without there being some dust present.
post #10024 of 12370

One man's living is doing just enough, as fast as possible, to a budget.

 

Another man's living is doing everything possible, in enough time, which determines the budget.

 

It is no surprise that they are looking through opposite ends of the telescope.

post #10025 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

You don't need to apologize...you can't start a "dust up" without there being some dust present.

?
post #10026 of 12370
nod[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

You don't need to apologize...you can't start a "dust up" without there being some dust present.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

?

Think about what was said (for once) by Munky...I suspect that when he said "dust up" he was politely referring to "contention" (or something like it).

You can't have contention without contentiousness.

You say you don't want to argue but you find every excuse to contend (at least with me)--to create argument where objectively there shouldn't be, isn't really, any argument.

I want to believe that you are an earnest and sincere individual...I really do. But how can you parse--distort/misquote/misinterpret-- "it's not like they're touching the lining everywhere and/or sealing off the leather they do touch" into something that requires a response of "They press up against the linings. You know that as well"?

Of course, I know that. A careful read of that simple statement of mine clearly indicates I know/admit/say/acknowledge "they do touch"--just not "everywhere."

Yet your response, distorts my meaning to serve your own contentious purpose. And it's not the first time by a long shot.

You have to read every word in a sentence to understand what is being said. That's what sentences are all about--they are complete thoughts. Redacting or ignoring words like "it's not..." will never yield the same meaning or thought as "it is."

"They don't touch the lining anywhere" is completely different than "...it's not like they're touching the lining everywhere..."

So...assuming you understand the distinction...now, if not before...why even bring it up in the first place? Why come back at me with "They press up against the linings. You know that as well"?

It comes off, nearly perfectly, as arguing for the sake of argument.

And did you miss the Spoiler?

Enough! Just put me on your ignore list....since you're already ignoring my intent, meaning, and actual words, nothing will change really, except some of the "dust" will blow away.

Perhaps.

--
Edited by DWFII - 7/5/14 at 11:44am
post #10027 of 12370

A 'dust up' is British slang for 'having a fight' or 'falling out'. It seems that it happened despite my reservations...Please let's put our differences behind us and acknowledge that there are many ways to skin a cat. 'Skin a cat', is British slang suggesting that there are many different views to be held on any particular topic.  

post #10028 of 12370

Excuse me. What is the difference between ordinary Goodyear welting and Goodyear storm welting? Thank you in advance, Munky. 

post #10029 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Excuse me. What is the difference between ordinary Goodyear welting and Goodyear storm welting? Thank you in advance, Munky. 

Goodyear is a technique--a machine technique. Some sort of welt is mounted to/on the insole with a Goodyear welting machine.

Storm welting is a specialized welt that has a "bead" above the surface of the welt. Sometimes it can be made by partially splitting a thick welt and turning up one edge such that it lies against the side of the vamp. The theory is that the bead or raised edge prevents water and dirt from getting into the inseam.
post #10030 of 12370

Thanks, DWF.

post #10031 of 12370

Yes, thanks DW, but can you tell us whether it works?

 

Since people avoid wearing their dress shoes unprotected through wet weather, does storm welting do any good in such situations? Does it help with boots made for wetness?

post #10032 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

Yes, thanks DW, but can you tell us whether it works?

Since people avoid wearing their dress shoes unprotected through wet weather, does storm welting do any good in such situations? Does it help with boots made for wetness?

Imperfectly.

I suspect storm welt was developed to look like a Norwegian welt. But the techniques for inseaming and the result after inseaming are worlds apart. Norwegian welts actually do prevent water and dirt, etc., from getting in between the insole and the outsole.

Storm welt might block incidental splashes but not much else. Storm welt is like a dike, once moisture gets over the top, the inseam is as exposed and vulnerable as it would be with regular welt.
post #10033 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Goodyear is a technique--a machine technique. Some sort of welt is mounted to/on the insole with a Goodyear welting machine.

Storm welting is a specialized welt that has a "bead" above the surface of the welt. Sometimes it can be made by partially splitting a thick welt and turning up one edge such that it lies against the side of the vamp. The theory is that the bead or raised edge prevents water and dirt from getting into the inseam.

Do you make your own storm welts as needed?
post #10034 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Do you make your own storm welts as needed?

No...I don't "need" them. Almost nothing I make wants storm welting.

That said, I have made in the past and have some storm welting left over from when I did more repair. To be honest I don't think I would even try to make the "beaded" kind but some old shoemaking tools intended for channeling seem well suited to making split storm welt.
post #10035 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

No...I don't "need" them. Almost nothing I make wants storm welting.

That said, I have made in the past and have some storm welting left over from when I did more repair. To be honest I don't think I would even try to make the "beaded" kind but some old shoemaking tools intended for channeling seem well suited to making split storm welt.

They are popular these days but I understand the time consuming intricacies of making them yourself.
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