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We are losing the war on capitalization - Page 2

post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas
Ok, I'll confess - worse than capitalization - it's all the excess words that kill me! People who write or speak for mass consumption seem to opt for quantity over quality. Has anyone not read Hemingway lately?

On Monday, we closed early for the weather. I asked someone to do up a brief script for a phone message. After three lines of clearing his throat, he eventually meandered to his point, which was - please call tomorrow.

A lot of people have difficulty distilling their thoughts in to a concise message, even a simple one.
post #17 of 33
i'm lazy. I use proper capitalization and grammar for work communication. I am winning the war. The War! to everything there is a season, Turn Turn etc.
post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
A lot of people have difficulty distilling their thoughts in to a concise message, even a simple one.

That is certainly true, but how many - in business and politics especially - run the opposite direction from simplicity and directness? I knew this one pompous windbag for whom everything was a "dramatic and timely opportunity for a major paradigm shift" ?!? He could have said "Time for a change", but when I said that he thought I sounded like a simpleton. Of course he couldn't put it so few words. As he continued spewing and stumbling over his words, I hoped he would run out of breath so he would pass out and I could tape his overworked mouth shut. Alas, no such luck.
post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas
That is certainly true, but how many - in business and politics especially - run the opposite direction from simplicity and directness? I knew this one pompous windbag for whom everything was a "dramatic and timely opportunity for a major paradigm shift" ?!? He could have said "Time for a change", but when I said that he thought I sounded like a simpleton. Of course he couldn't put it so few words. As he continued spewing and stumbling over his words, I hoped he would run out of breath so he would pass out and I could tape his overworked mouth shut. Alas, no such luck.

There are certainly extremes at both ends, however I believe there is a clear purpose for it in business and politics. A manager that wraps statements in hyperbole will often generate more excitement and hence better results from his employees than a manager that distills every idea down to its core and dispenses instructions in the most expedient way possible. People make fun of Steve Balmer because he's so animated and makes everything sound big but he's extremely effective.
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
There are certainly extremes at both ends, however I believe there is a clear purpose for it in business and politics. A manager that wraps statements in hyperbole will often generate more excitement and hence better results from his employees than a manager that distills every idea down to its core and dispenses instructions in the most expedient way possible. People make fun of Steve Balmer because he's so animated and makes everything sound big but he's extremely effective.
I've read about Kissinger's technique of monotonous droning speech during negotiations, wherein he would lull the other party and then catch them off guard. Verbal equivalent of fine print, maybe?
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas
Is that the war on drugs, or the war on poverty? Or maybe the war on non-sequiturs?
How about the war on women, not wearing hosiery??
post #22 of 33
Thread Starter 
I think we can find a close correlation between divorce rates, the rise of rap music and abortion with the decline in capitalization.
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas
Ok, I'll confess - worse than capitalization - it's all the excess words that kill me! People who write or speak for mass consumption seem to opt for quantity over quality. Has anyone not read Hemingway lately? On Monday, we closed early for the weather. I asked someone to do up a brief script for a phone message. After three lines of clearing his throat, he eventually meandered to his point, which was - please call tomorrow.
I like how the German academics used to write in the 19th through the mid-20th century. However, I am also keen on the sparsely disturbing style of Paul Bowles.
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by faustian bargain
I've read about Kissinger's technique of monotonous droning speech during negotiations, wherein he would lull the other party and then catch them off guard. Verbal equivalent of fine print, maybe?

I've heard that he drones for all occasions, public speaking included. In fact, I think he drones in print as well. That said, all's fair in war and negotiations.
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
I think we can find a close correlation between divorce rates, the rise of rap music and abortion with the decline in capitalization.
http://www.yahoo.com/s/415349

You might be right. Might be linked to a decline in spelling, grammar, punctuation, and literacy, too.
post #26 of 33
I think a lot of it comes down to childish rebellion.

I do use minimal capitalization and punctuation on text messages, though, but that's because trying to do that on a traditional cell phone is insane. Even with a Blackberry or Treo-type phone with an alpha keyboard, they're just too small to make life so difficult for yourself. skru it.

*sigh* I'm actually old enough to find it strange to be able to refer to "traditional cell phones".
post #27 of 33
Yes, it gets annoying.

Sometimes I get worried that we are losing the war on full-stops as well. That's when my life is over.
post #28 of 33
ur all crazie cmon it iz cmplty clr wht i m sayng here dontcha?
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas
Ok, I'll confess - worse than capitalization - it's all the excess words that kill me! People who write or speak for mass consumption seem to opt for quantity over quality. Has anyone not read Hemingway lately?

On Monday, we closed early for the weather. I asked someone to do up a brief script for a phone message. After three lines of clearing his throat, he eventually meandered to his point, which was - please call tomorrow.
Yes. I, for one, have not read Hemingway lately.
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
ur all crazie cmon it iz cmplty clr wht i m sayng here dontcha?
d00d, wtf? cApS r0x0r$
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