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** Quintessential Crockett & Jones Thread ** (reviews, quality, etc...) - Page 514

post #7696 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

Love my Somervilles, 363 last.
Two years ago I wan contemplating an EG Shannon MTO with moustache vamp (like galway) and swann neck but no broguing, 82 last. Would have had to be top-drawer and in the end I got a Galway instead. Made the right choice. Apart from the moustache vamp and the swann neck the Somerville is almost identical to the Shannon I had in mind and a much cheaper option. I think CJ discontinued dark brown however, though you might be lucky of you get your hands on a pair next sale.

I didn't know they discontinued the dark brown color. The dark brown leather is very nice and soft and does age well. C&J lasts just fits me long and EG fits me better which is why I pre-ordered a Shannon similar to what you wanted (kept the brogue cap though) and moving my Somervilles. I also prefer the slightly stiffer leather EG uses. After the discussion of the refurbishing costs of EG, C&J are more reasonable options. smile.gif
post #7697 of 12827
I'd like to be associated with the words of the last speaker
post #7698 of 12827
@Thinkderm

Hm dunno tbh. I like tan boots but the more chunky, country type boot. Personally I think the Somerville is a bit too formal for cord. People often think I'm just wearing toe-cap oxfords and thats what they look like. Wouldn't make sense in whisky cord imo. I have another pair of Galways in edwardian (also 82) and I find them much less wearable than my dark oak / CC pair due to the colour even though the leather on them is nicer. I think a whisky shell toe-cap oxford boot would suffer the same fate.
The Somerville in whiskey cord would look great as a shoe 'an sich' but I'd have no idea what to wear it with. Too casual for a business suit and too formal for jeans.
Would be a great boot for someone who already has all the basics and wants something unique though.

Just my 2ct
post #7699 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

@Thinkderm

Hm dunno tbh. I like tan boots but the more chunky, country type boot. Personally I think the Somerville is a bit too formal for cord. People often think I'm just wearing toe-cap oxfords and thats what they look like. Wouldn't make sense in whisky cord imo. I have another pair of Galways in edwardian (also 82) and I find them much less wearable than my dark oak / CC pair due to the colour even though the leather on them is nicer. I think a whisky shell toe-cap oxford boot would suffer the same fate.
The Somerville in whiskey cord would look great as a shoe 'an sich' but I'd have no idea what to wear it with. Too casual for a business suit and too formal for jeans.
Would be a great boot for someone who already has all the basics and wants something unique though.

Just my 2ct

Great thoughts Crat. thank you for sharing. I love the way cordovan patinas and ages. Well fitting cordovan combined with great trees look fantastic, forever. I have a few great pairs of brown shoes and brown cap toe oxfords, and brown cap toe cordovan boots and want to take part (if possible) in the beautiful whiskey color that C&J cordovan offers (almost ravello-esque). It's the type of boot you can get when you have many others in your stable, so to speak.

I don't think it has to be too formal for denims, nor does it have to be too casual for business - depends on what type of business one is doing - and how formal the suit is. To wear to an interview, no. To wear elsewhere, with a brown suit, or some colored khakis, why not. The galways in Edwardian that you have (on the 82, which is similar in my opinion to the 363 last - what are your thoughts) - they might not get as much foot-time as the dark oak/cc pair, but they are still beauties, and they get wear. Fortunately, you can have both. Edwardian for when you want something slightly different than brown/DOak icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

I agree with you - For those that have everything, this will be a brilliant boot - definitely some next level booting-ish.
post #7700 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleav View Post

I'd like to be associated with the words of the last speaker
always so kind!

Great cleaning kit! I'm sure that'll motivate more regular cleaning routines. I'm a simple man... a plastic container holds my polishes and brushes. I'm happy that my wife doesn't complain a out the brushing noises.
post #7701 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

Great thoughts Crat. thank you for sharing. I love the way cordovan patinas and ages. Well fitting cordovan combined with great trees look fantastic, forever. I have a few great pairs of brown shoes and brown cap toe oxfords, and brown cap toe cordovan boots and want to take part (if possible) in the beautiful whiskey color that C&J cordovan offers (almost ravello-esque). It's the type of boot you can get when you have many others in your stable, so to speak.

I don't think it has to be too formal for denims, nor does it have to be too casual for business - depends on what type of business one is doing - and how formal the suit is. To wear to an interview, no. To wear elsewhere, with a brown suit, or some colored khakis, why not. The galways in Edwardian that you have (on the 82, which is similar in my opinion to the 363 last - what are your thoughts) - they might not get as much foot-time as the dark oak/cc pair, but they are still beauties, and they get wear. Fortunately, you can have both. Edwardian for when you want something slightly different than brown/DOak icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

I agree with you - For those that have everything, this will be a brilliant boot - definitely some next level booting-ish.

Agreed, aged cordovan looks great. It's a love-it or hate-it material but I love it due to its resilience. Trees are indeed a must to prevent too much creasing. From what I've seen ravello tends to be more chestnut and whisky leans more towards tan, see pic of my ravello Alden's in spoiler.

When it comes to denim i don't agree. Cordovan as a material is a great combo with denim but every time I see a pic of jeans worn with an oxford I think..."Why? A derby would have looked so much better." This is a great article on oxfords vs derbies btw.
A whiskey somerville would shine (pun intended) under a tweed or country-type suit or grey flannels with an odd jacket, but not jeans.

Regarding your thoughts on the 363 compared to the 82 I couldn't agree more. They are both asymmetric (banana) almond toe shaped lasts. Both are great.
Here is a side-by-side comparison.






Ravello Alden ravello (Click to show)
post #7702 of 12827
On request for a gentlemen, both boots are made for Holland & Holland , I love them as much as I love my Galway boots!


photo 396FAE76-6D81-47DC-9884-20F333C4FE5C_zps811cit7s.jpg


photo null_zpsed25f3a4.jpg
Edited by Farhad19620 - 9/3/14 at 1:57am
post #7703 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farhad19620 View Post

On request for a gentlemen, both boots are made for Holland & Holland , I love them as much as I love my Galway boots!

  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
photo 396FAE76-6D81-47DC-9884-20F333C4FE5C_zps811cit7s.jpg


photo null_zpsed25f3a4.jpg

 

Thank you. I like the first one more.

post #7704 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

Agreed, aged cordovan looks great. It's a love-it or hate-it material but I love it due to its resilience. Trees are indeed a must to prevent too much creasing. From what I've seen ravello tends to be more chestnut and whisky leans more towards tan, see pic of my ravello Alden's in spoiler.

When it comes to denim i don't agree. Cordovan as a material is a great combo with denim but every time I see a pic of jeans worn with an oxford I think..."Why? A derby would have looked so much better." This is a great article on oxfords vs derbies btw.
A whiskey somerville would shine (pun intended) under a tweed or country-type suit or grey flannels with an odd jacket, but not jeans.

Regarding your thoughts on the 363 compared to the 82 I couldn't agree more. They are both asymmetric (banana) almond toe shaped lasts. Both are great.
Here is a side-by-side comparison.

Ravello Alden ravello (Click to show)

Those are wonderful points Crat. I love cordovan when it fits right (snug) and doesn't get unseemly ripples. I find the best material & makeup for this is a captoe oxford/balmoral - limiting the ripples and flex to just behind the toecap with proper fit. Proper feet and fit and trees reduce creasing. Creases do add character though, and are part of the appeal!

Cordovan and demin - yes. Sometimes one might want to wear something dressier as footwear with denim. That's when bals/oxfords come in, and that's OK depending on who you are and lifestyle. Blucher/derby boots are more rugged looking, for sure, and are a good start for most denim instances. For most, this wouldn't be a "pair with denims/jeans" type boot. Me personally, I prefer bal boots and oxfords (despite formality) compared to most bluchers. I do love the blucher boots I have though!

I think they would go well with chinos and other khakis as well. In agreement they would look great with flannels and tweed. Exactly. Not for navy suiting, at least not in most instances.

Those Ravellos you are rocking are darker than most ravellos and are a beautiful color, just as C&J's whiskey is darker than other whiskeys I've seen. Both beautiful.

Thanks for posting that side by side photo. Interesting to compare the lasts. The 363 looks ever so slightly narrower and sharper than the 82 last. Is the galway on the 82 a F fitting, with the 363 an E fitting?
post #7705 of 12827
Thank you for sharing Farhad. CJ does grained boots very well!
post #7706 of 12827

I'll be picking up a few of the new C&J models...will post pics eventually when I get them.

 

also, to Cleav, I have the same kit...its lovely!

post #7707 of 12827
So I'm revisiting the C&J winter boot thing, and I would prefer the Snowden boot, but it's a fair bit more expensive than the Islay. What would you guys recommend? I love the look of both boots.
post #7708 of 12827

I'd always recommend buying up for the boot you prefer. ...and then save up for the other one, so you can buy them next winter ;)

 

<Siderail>

 

For me, the is something sensible in planning these sort of thing. Make a shoe/boot budget and work within it.

I plan and buy one pair of boots in the fall and one pair of shoes in the spring. The way I see it, is that there is something positive in the love of craft and fine footwear - but also in actually then using that footwear on a day to day basis. Using it and taking care of it, so you have enjoyment of the shoe/boot for many yes to come. Building a natural patina from wear and polish, that only adds to the design and so on. In it's roots, I recon that it's a bit old fashioned to think this way. For me, 1-2 pairs of footwear each season hits that balance.

 

Do I want more? Absolutely. Do I need more? Nope... Is there something wrong with buying alot of footwear, if you have the means to do so? Not at all!

 

It's all a question of balancing want's and need's. 

 

</Siderail>

post #7709 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by aglose View Post

So I'm revisiting the C&J winter boot thing, and I would prefer the Snowden boot, but it's a fair bit more expensive than the Islay. What would you guys recommend? I love the look of both boots.

 

I have both...and love both.

 

The snowdon is a much more 'hardcore' winter boot. It has a veldtschoen construction making the welt nearly impermeable to water...along with a waxed calf upper which aids in this also. It has a bellows tongue in case you go through deep water and it has a commando sole. It is this style of boot, made by C&J, the Ernest Shackleton and his crew wore on their arctic expeditions.

 

The Islay is more of a classic country boot that can be worn more 'fashionably'. The scotch grain calf and wingtip broguing keep it in this country range. It has a dainite rubber sole which is good, but not the same as a commando for ice and snow.

 

So it really depends - do you want a shit-kicking badass mud and snow winter boot that isn't going to fit so well into a fashionable outfit?...or do you want a country-style brogue boot that can be worn casually or dressed up in country garb and that can be worn in the winter crap, but not as effectively....   ???

post #7710 of 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

 

I have both...and love both.

 

The snowdon is a much more 'hardcore' winter boot. It has a veldtschoen construction making the welt nearly impermeable to water...along with a waxed calf upper which aids in this also. It has a bellows tongue in case you go through deep water and it has a commando sole. It is this style of boot, made by C&J, the Ernest Shackleton and his crew wore on their arctic expeditions.

 

The Islay is more of a classic country boot that can be worn more 'fashionably'. The scotch grain calf and wingtip broguing keep it in this country range. It has a dainite rubber sole which is good, but not the same as a commando for ice and snow.

 

So it really depends - do you want a shit-kicking badass mud and snow winter boot that isn't going to fit so well into a fashionable outfit?...or do you want a country-style brogue boot that can be worn casually or dressed up in country garb and that can be worn in the winter crap, but not as effectively....   ???


Perfect description.

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