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Stick shift drivers. - Page 3

post #31 of 79
I learned on manual. A VW bug that had only 3rd and 4th gear.
What a hoot looking back. I always had manual until the late
90s when I started having knee trouble. My solution has been
to keep 1 manual car and 1 auto car to choose from, depending
on the situation and my physical condition.

If I had to choose, manual.

I agree with everyone for sure: The Taurus SUCKS.
They stink. They're ugly, get crap gas milage, drive
like a boat...well anyway
post #32 of 79
I have a functional left leg, so obviously I have no excuse to drive anything but a manual. And equally obviously, I wouldn't consider driving anything less. The term "less" includes modern reinterpretations of the old (and annoying, and unreliable) Citroënmatique as offered by BMW, Toyota, Ferrari, Aston, VAG, and so on. (It's amazing how much "new" technology is really just "technology for which Citroën's patents ran out." Another example is swiveling headlights...) If I were an amputee and no satisfactory hand-operated clutch were available, I might consider one of the Citroënmatique riffs, but there will never, ever, ever be one of those foul and dastardly torque converters slushing about in any car I may ever own.
post #33 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
If by "paddle shift" you mean SMG, a more accurate description would be that it's an "automatic way of shifting a manual." SMG is a completely manual transmission with an electronically-actuated clutch unlike tiptronic or other gimmicks that are automatic transmissions in which the driver can "suggest" shift points to the computer.

I stand corrected.
post #34 of 79
I knew that if I learned how to use a manual transmission, I'd probably end up caring about cars. And that is both stupid and expensive. There's room for only so many vices in a man's life.
post #35 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
[...] take the automatic so I could daydream on the way home and not worry about paying attention to my driving.

IiiiiiiiiiiiiiiEEeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
post #36 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
If by "paddle shift" you mean SMG, a more accurate description would be that it's an "automatic way of shifting a manual." SMG is a completely manual transmission with an electronically-actuated clutch unlike tiptronic or other gimmicks that are automatic transmissions in which the driver can "suggest" shift points to the computer.

To add on to dah328's post, SMG, DSG, and other computer-controlled clutch gearshifts are often called semiautomatic transmissions. Tiptronic, Steptronic, and other shiftable automatic transmissions use torque converters to transmit torque from the engine to the gears. The differentiating feature between these systems is not that you have paddle-shifters or even that you can change gears, because both systems have those kind of controls, but whether it uses a clutch (or two in the case of DSG) or a torque converter.

The automatics are getting quite good. There are a number of them now that shift fairly quickly and do rev-matched downshifts.

BTW, if you want to see a great example of what a skilled driver can do with downshifts, check out this video of Hans Stuck driving the BMW M3 GTR racecar (the one with the V8 banned in the ALMS) around the old Nurburgring:

http://www.bmwtransact.com/microsite/Nurburgring/

It's an H-pattern shifter with dog gears so he doesn't use the clutch once the car is moving, but he has to manually perform the rev-matched downshifts. The upshifts are more automated: there's a force sensor in the shifter knob that detects when he's shifting, and cuts the engine if it's an upshift. He's moving very quickly too --- I believe he's setting pole for the 24 Hour race at the Ring which the car ultimately won. Note how calm he is compared to how fast the car is going.

--Andre
post #37 of 79
This is a remarkable poll. As a whole we are way out of the range of normal on this issue. Maybe it's because most of us are control freaks -- the way we drive, the way we dress, etc.
post #38 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
I've never seen (or been in) a car with a column shift. I've only seen trucks with that kind of manual transmission
ahh three-on-the-tree transmission - I learned to drive in an old Holden (Australian car) with a column shifter. Those were the days. Generally only went into the cars with a bench front seat (which is why it was more common in trucks and vans)
post #39 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by montecristo#4
This is a remarkable poll. As a whole we are way out of the range of normal on this issue. Maybe it's because most of us are control freaks -- the way we drive, the way we dress, etc.

True, but I imagine there is a significant amount of self-selection bias involved. Guys who prefer sticks preach.

~ Huntsman
post #40 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
ahh three-on-the-tree transmission - I learned to drive in an old Holden (Australian car) with a column shifter. Those were the days. Generally only went into the cars with a bench front seat (which is why it was more common in trucks and vans)
Ditto here - I learned on a Fiat Millicento column shift - perhaps the last generation to do so in India before those Suzuki 800s grabbed the market. The handbrake was way out under the bench seat somewhere, so heel-and-toe driving was a survival technique. Both of my current cars are stick shifts. I taught the missus how to drive on the first car we owned as a couple; she griped about it for a while, but I recently heard her say to someone that she would never consider driving anything else
post #41 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia
I knew that if I learned how to use a manual transmission, I'd probably end up caring about cars. And that is both stupid and expensive. There's room for only so many vices in a man's life.

You know, I think you may have a point there. I make a point of knowing how to drive my car, but could care less that it's an automatic.

Granted, I've never had the opportunity to learn manual, so I don't know otherwise. I had tried to learn at one point, but I don't know anyone who has a car with a manual transmission, and driving schools don't have those cars either.
post #42 of 79
Three-on-the-tree manuals were not uncommon in the late 50's, early sixties. I've never driven one, but it strikes me as the daftest thing. My father drove a Plymouth Sport Fury with a pushbutton auto and a 383 he was fond of; he liked to downshift it and chirp the tires at 60mph. Also seems somewhat inelegant.

My Jag didn't have a U.S. option for a manual after the first year's production. At least not with the V-12. Apparently, those early cars suffered too much tweaking out on starting, (which is surprising as the 12 isn't torquey in the low end) and Jag drivers aren't (generally) after that. However, graduation will shortly reverse my cash flow and the 5 spd Tremec will be ordered; I have no issues with tweaking tyres.

My only experience with double clutching is in the tractor with it's straight cut trans. Of course it has so much torque that you would start in High, 3rd if you wanted it, but I shift it on the fly sometimes because I am contrary.

~ Huntsman
post #43 of 79
since traffic here in manila is horrendous at times. i opt to drive automatic.
post #44 of 79
Thread Starter 
I've never driven farm equipment or a large truck before, however, for certain English cars, you have to double declutch.
post #45 of 79
Quote:
ahh three-on-the-tree transmission - I learned to drive in an old Holden (Australian car) with a column shifter. Those were the days. Generally only went into the cars with a bench front seat (which is why it was more common in trucks and vans)

Ah yes, the bench seat (usually vinyl). There was nothing like driving a big Chevy truck with a "three on the tree", trying to shift while going around a turn and sliding across the seat! Good times!


I didn't know someone filmed my morning commute!!


I wish I could've seen the rpms (speed) going down the straightaways. That video was awesome!
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