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Stick shift drivers. - Page 2

post #16 of 79
Here's a nice accessory for all those driving automatics:

http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main...8422ecda26fd31
post #17 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai
Here's a nice accessory for all those driving automatics:

http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main...8422ecda26fd31

post #18 of 79
At 16 years old, my dad taught me how to drive stick on his old Chevy pick up truck with the "three on the tree". He said, "if you can drive this, you can drive anything."

He was right!
post #19 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
At 16 years old, my dad taught me how to drive stick on his old Chevy pick up truck with the "three on the tree". He said, "if you can drive this, you can drive anything."

He was right!

"three on the tree". Does it mean double-shifting? If not that it's a pussy manual.
post #20 of 79
Thread Starter 
What we hardly see anymore are the column shift manual cars. Mercedes-Benz used to make a lot of these during the 1960s for their sedans but presumably no modern maker does, only floor shift types. The earlier Citroen DS and their cheap variation ID used a column shift, albeit semi-automatic. I don't know what a "paddle-shift" is and I recently learned through an old VITALS article on Porsche what "Tiptronic" is. I suppose for some cars, an automatic is preferable almost given the inherent weakness of the manual design for that particular make. For example, the Facel Vega, which apparently had a weaker Pont-a-Mousson manual than its TorqueFlite automatic.
post #21 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
What we hardly see anymore are the column shift manual cars. Mercedes-Benz used to make a lot of these during the 1960s for their sedans but presumably no modern maker does, only floor shift types.

I've never seen (or been in) a car with a column shift. I've only seen trucks with that kind of manual transmission.

I was in a car (1950-60?) something which only had push buttons for gears. One would just push the button 1,2 3,4 on the dash to shift into that gear.

Quote:
"three on the tree". Does it mean double-shifting? If not that it's a pussy manual.

I hate driving tractors and straight trucks that I have to double shift. I just grind the gears. I kinda like the sound. Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
post #22 of 79
Automatic is for cowards. I drove a rented automatic Taurus across half the country. Worst fucking car ever.
post #23 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
I've never seen (or been in) a car with a column shift. I've only seen trucks with that kind of manual transmission.

I was in a car (1950-60?) something which only had push buttons for gears. One would just push the button 1,2 3,4 on the dash to shift into that gear.



I hate driving tractors and straight trucks that I have to double shift. I just grind the gears. I kinda like the sound. Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Here's a Mercedes-Benz with that type of system:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1961-...QQcmdZViewItem

The Facel Vega HK500 had that sort of system:



I think the new Ferraris also has that sort of gear change with something on the steering wheel.
post #24 of 79
Thread Starter 
Recently someone told me that most driving schools do not teach a manual transmission even upon request. It's up to your racy but likeable Uncle Ernie at the family reunion.
post #25 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Recently someone told me that most driving schools do not teach a manual transmission even upon request. It's up to your racy but likeable Uncle Ernie at the family reunion.


People don't want to drive manual transmissions anymore. How can one shift when talking on the phone and eating at the same time?
post #26 of 79
I drive a 1.8T, 5 speed VW Passat. I learned on a 5-speed Civic DX.
Next car will be BMW SMG or VW/Audi doubleclutch paddle shift transmission.
post #27 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Automatic is for cowards. I drove a rented automatic Taurus across half the country. Worst fucking car ever.

Our company cars are Tauruses. IMO the worst are the overboosted pwr steering, seats, brakes(all of our cars have warped rotors), transmission, and interior plastics.

Best part is the ac and decent mpg.
post #28 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
What we hardly see anymore are the column shift manual cars. Mercedes-Benz used to make a lot of these during the 1960s for their sedans but presumably no modern maker does, only floor shift types.

The earlier Citroen DS and their cheap variation ID used a column shift, albeit semi-automatic. I don't know what a "paddle-shift" is and I recently learned through an old VITALS article on Porsche what "Tiptronic" is.

I suppose for some cars, an automatic is preferable almost given the inherent weakness of the manual design for that particular make. For example, the Facel Vega, which apparently had a weaker Pont-a-Mousson manual than its TorqueFlite automatic.

The '40s Packards had manual column shift.

Paddle shift is a Formula-1 adaptation seen in many modern cars that is more or less a manual way of shifting an automatic.
post #29 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
Paddle shift is a Formula-1 adaptation seen in many modern cars that is more or less a manual way of shifting an automatic.
If by "paddle shift" you mean SMG, a more accurate description would be that it's an "automatic way of shifting a manual." SMG is a completely manual transmission with an electronically-actuated clutch unlike tiptronic or other gimmicks that are automatic transmissions in which the driver can "suggest" shift points to the computer.
post #30 of 79
I loved driving stick and held out for years, but when I bought my current car I was doing a longish commute in city traffic and decided to take the automatic so I could daydream on the way home and not worry about paying attention to my driving.
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